Secretary of State for the Southern Department

Southern SecretarySecretary of StateSouthern DepartmentSecretary of the SouthSouthernremit included IrelandSecretary for the Southern ColoniesSouthern DepartmentsSouthern Secretary of StateUnder Secretary of State for the Southern Department
The Secretary of State for the Southern Department was a position in the cabinet of the government of Kingdom of Great Britain up to 1782, when the Southern Department became the Foreign Office.wikipedia
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Secretary of State for the Colonies

Colonial SecretaryColonial OfficeBritish Secretary of State for the Colonies
The Secretary of State for the Southern Department, the more senior, was responsible for Southern England, Wales, Ireland, the American colonies (until 1768 when the charge was given to the Secretary of State for the Colonies), and relations with the Roman Catholic and Muslim states of Europe.
Previously, colonial responsibilities were held jointly by the Lords of Trade and Plantations and the Secretary of State for the Southern Department, who was responsible for Southern England, Wales, Ireland, the American colonies, and relations with the Catholic and Muslim states of Europe.

Secretary of State (United Kingdom)

Secretary of StateSecretaries of StateSec. of State
Before 1782, the responsibilities of the two British Secretaries of State for the Northern and the Southern departments were divided not based on the principles of modern ministerial divisions, but geographically.
Their posts came to be known as the Secretary of State for the Northern Department and the Secretary of State for the Southern Department.

Secretary of State for the Northern Department

Northern SecretarySecretary of StateNorthern
The Secretary of State for the Northern Department, the more junior, was responsible for Northern England, Scotland, and relations with the Protestant states of northern Europe.
The more senior Secretary of State for the Southern Department was responsible for relations with the Catholic and Muslim states of Europe.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Foreign OfficeBritish Foreign OfficeFCO
The Secretary of State for the Southern Department was a position in the cabinet of the government of Kingdom of Great Britain up to 1782, when the Southern Department became the Foreign Office.
The Foreign Office was formed in March 1782 by combining the Southern and Northern Departments of the Secretary of State, each of which covered both foreign and domestic affairs in their parts of the Kingdom.

Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs

Foreign SecretaryBritish Foreign SecretarySecretary of State for Foreign Affairs
In 1782, the two Secretaries of State were reformed as the Secretary of State for the Home Department and the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs.
The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the British governmental reorganisation of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices, respectively.

Henry Coventry

Hon. Henry CoventryHenryThe Hon. Henry Coventry
The Honourable Henry Coventry (1619–1686) was an English politician who was Secretary of State for the Northern Department between 1672 and 1674 and the Southern Department between 1674 and 1680.

James Vernon

the MP
James Vernon (1646–1727) was an English politician and Secretary of State for both the Northern and the Southern Departments during the reign of William III.

Charles Middleton, 2nd Earl of Middleton

Earl of MiddletonThe Earl of MiddletonCharles Middleton, previously 2nd Earl of Middleton
He served as Secretary of State for Scotland, the Northern Department and the Southern Department, before acting as chief advisor to James II and then his son James III during their exile in France.

Henry Bennet, 1st Earl of Arlington

Henry BennetArlingtonLord Arlington
Allying himself with Lady Castlemaine, he encouraged Charles's increasing dislike of Clarendon; and he was made secretary of state in October 1662 in spite of the opposition of Clarendon, who had to find him a seat in parliament.

Robert Spencer, 2nd Earl of Sunderland

Earl of SunderlandSunderlandThe Earl of Sunderland
Intermittently, between 1682 and 1688, he served as Secretary of State for the Southern Department, Lord Lieutenant of Warwickshire, and Lord President of the Council; in 1687, he signed the King's grant of religious freedom for the Brenttown (Brenton) tract in Prince William County, Virginia, to encourage settlement of French Protestants.

William Legge, 1st Earl of Dartmouth

Lord DartmouthWilliam Legge, 2nd Baron DartmouthThe Lord Dartmouth
In 1702, he was appointed a member of the Board of Trade and Plantations, and eight years later he became Secretary of State for the Southern Department and joint keeper of the signet for Scotland.

Leoline Jenkins

Sir Leoline JenkinsLeolineSir '''Leoline Jenkins
He served as Secretary of State for the Northern Department from 26 April 1680 to 2 February 1681 and Secretary of State for the Southern Department from 2 February 1681 to 14 April 1684.

James Stanhope, 1st Earl Stanhope

James StanhopeLord StanhopeStanhope
As Southern Secretary he oversaw the negotiation of an Anglo-French Alliance.

Robert Darcy, 4th Earl of Holderness

The Earl of HoldernessEarl of HoldernessRobert Darcy
In 1751 he became Secretary of State for the Southern Department, transferring in 1754 to the Northern Department, and he remained in office until March 1761, when he was dismissed by King George III in favour of Lord Bute, although he had largely been a cipher in that position to the stronger personalities of his colleagues, successively the Duke of Newcastle, Thomas Robinson, Henry Fox, and William Pitt the Elder.

Henry Fox, 1st Baron Holland

Henry FoxLord HollandFox
He held the posts of Secretary at War, Southern Secretary and Paymaster of the Forces, from which latter post he enriched himself.

John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford

Duke of BedfordThe Duke of Bedford4th Duke of Bedford
He was very successful at the admiralty, but was not equally fortunate after he became Secretary of State for the Southern Department in February 1748.

Thomas Pelham-Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle

Duke of NewcastleThe Duke of NewcastleNewcastle
In 1724 Newcastle was chosen by Sir Robert Walpole to be Secretary of State for the Southern Department in place of Lord Carteret, a move largely engineered by Townshend.

Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl of Sunderland

The Earl of SunderlandSunderlandLord Sunderland
Although he was tinged with republican ideas and had made himself obnoxious to Queen Anne by opposing the grant to her husband, Prince George, through the influence of Marlborough he was foisted into the ministry as Secretary of State for the Southern Department, taking office in December 1706.

John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville

Lord CarteretThe Lord CarteretCarteret
Appointed as Secretary of State for the Southern Department on his return home, he soon came into conflict with the intrigues of Townshend and Sir Robert Walpole.

James Craggs the Younger

James CraggsJames Craggs''' 'the Youngerthe Younger
In 1713 he became Member of Parliament for Tregony, in 1717 Secretary at War, and in the following year Secretary of State for the Southern Department.

Charles Montagu, 1st Duke of Manchester

Charles Montagu, 4th Earl of ManchesterThe Earl of ManchesterCharles Montagu
He was then briefly appointed Secretary of State for the Southern Department, a post he held between January and May 1702.

Henry Seymour Conway

ConwayHenry ConwayGeneral Henry Seymour Conway
He held various political offices including Chief Secretary for Ireland, Secretary of State for the Southern Department, Leader of the House of Commons and Secretary of State for the Northern Department.

Charles Lennox, 3rd Duke of Richmond

Duke of RichmondCharles Lennox3rd Duke of Richmond
He associated with the Rockingham Whigs and rose to hold the post of Southern Secretary for a brief period.

Charles Wyndham, 2nd Earl of Egremont

Charles WyndhamSir Charles Wyndham, 4th BaronetEarl of Egremont
Charles Wyndham, 2nd Earl of Egremont (19 August 171021 August 1763), PC, of Orchard Wyndham in Somerset, Petworth House in Sussex, and of Egremont House in Mayfair, London, was a British statesman who served as Secretary of State for the Southern Department from 1761-63.

Anne, Queen of Great Britain

Queen AnneAnnePrincess Anne
In 1706, Godolphin and the Marlboroughs forced Anne to accept Lord Sunderland, a Junto Whig and the Marlboroughs' son-in-law, as Harley's colleague as Secretary of State for the Southern Department.