Securities Exchange Act of 1934

Securities Exchange ActSecurities and Exchange ActSecurities and Exchange Act of 19341934 Act1938 Maloney Act amendmentsExchange Act1934National Securities Exchange ActSEA 1934Securities and Exchange Act 1934
The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (also called the Exchange Act, '34 Act, or 1934 Act) (, codified at et seq.) is a law governing the secondary trading of securities (stocks, bonds, and debentures) in the United States of America.wikipedia
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U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission

Securities and Exchange CommissionSECUnited States Securities and Exchange Commission
The 1934 Act also established the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the agency primarily responsible for enforcement of United States federal securities law.
In addition to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, which created it, the SEC enforces the Securities Act of 1933, the Trust Indenture Act of 1939, the Investment Company Act of 1940, the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, the Sarbanes–Oxley Act of 2002, and other statutes.

Self-regulatory organization

self-regulationself-regulatoryself-regulated
That amendment led to the creation of the National Association of Securities Dealers, Inc. – the NASD, which is a Self-Regulatory Organization (or SRO).
The principal federal regulatory authority—the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)—was established by the Federal Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

Initial public offering

IPOwent publicpublic
Companies raise billions of dollars by issuing securities in what is known as the primary market.
A typical violation addressed by the settlement was the case of CSFB and Salomon Smith Barney, which were alleged to have engaged in inappropriate spinning of "hot" IPOs and issued fraudulent research reports in violation of various sections within the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

SEC Rule 10b-5

Rule 10b-5Section 10(b)
As it developed, section 10(b) of the 1934 Act and corresponding SEC Rule 10b-5 have sweeping antifraud language.
SEC Rule 10b-5, codified at, is one of the most important rules targeting securities fraud promulgated by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, pursuant to its authority granted under § 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

Financial Industry Regulatory Authority

FINRANational Association of Securities DealersNASD
In 2007 the NASD merged with the NYSE (which had already taken over the AMEX) and the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) was created.
The NASD was founded in 1939 and was registered with the SEC in response to the 1938 Maloney Act amendments to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, which allowed it to supervise the conduct of its members subject to the oversight of the SEC.

Securities Act of 1933

Section 11Federal Securities ActSecurities Act
Contrasted with the Securities Act of 1933, which regulates these original issues, the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 regulates the secondary trading of those securities between persons often unrelated to the issuer, frequently through brokers or dealers.
Additional liability may be imposed under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (Rule 10b-5) against the "maker" of the alleged misrepresentation in certain circumstances.

Insider trading

inside informationinsider informationinsider dealing
Rule 10b-5 has been employed to cover insider trading cases, but has also been used against companies for price fixing (artificially inflating or depressing stock prices through stock manipulation), bogus company sales to increase stock price, and even a company's failure to communicate relevant information to investors.
Section 15 of the Securities Act of 1933 contained prohibitions of fraud in the sale of securities, later greatly strengthened by the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

Form 8-K

8-K8K
If something material happens with the company (change of CEO, change of auditing firm, destruction of a significant number of company assets), the SEC requires that the company issue within 4 business days an 8-K filing that reflects these changed conditions (see Regulation FD).
Form 8-K is required to be filed by public companies with the SEC pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.

Small Cap Liquidity Reform Act of 2013

Small Cap Liquidity Reform Act of 2013 (H.R. 3448; 113th Congress)
The Small Cap Liquidity Reform Act of 2013 (H.R. 3448; 113th Congress) would amend the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 to establish a liquidity pilot program for securities of emerging growth companies (EGC) with total annual gross revenues of less than $750 million, under which those securities shall be quoted using either: (1) a minimum increment of $0.05, (2) a minimum increment of $0.10, or (3) the increment at which the securities would be quoted without regard to such minimum increments.
The Small Cap Liquidity Reform Act of 2013 would amend the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 to establish a liquidity pilot program for securities of emerging growth companies (EGC) with total annual gross revenues of less than $750 million, under which those securities shall be quoted using either: (1) a minimum increment of $0.05, (2) a minimum increment of $0.10, or (3) the increment at which the securities would be quoted without regard to such minimum increments.

Form 10-K

10-K10-K report10-K Risk Factors
Provided that the company has more than a certain number of shareholders and has a certain amount of assets (500 shareholders, above $10 million in assets, per Act sections 12, 13, and 15), the '34 Act requires that issuers regularly file company information with the SEC on certain forms (the annual 10-K filing and the quarterly 10-Q filing).
The name of the Form 10-K comes from the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) designation of the form pursuant to sections 13 and 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 as amended.

Trust Indenture Act of 1939

trust indentureSecurities And Trust Indentures
Section 211 of The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 mandated that the SEC conduct various studies.

Investment Company Act of 1940

Investment Company Act1940 Act1940 Act fund
Along with the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Investment Advisers Act of 1940, and extensive rules issued by the Securities and Exchange Commission, it forms the backbone of United States financial regulation.

Williams Act

The Williams Act (USA) refers to 1968 amendments to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 enacted in 1968 regarding tender offers.

Securities regulation in the United States

securities lawsecuritiesfederal securities laws
The following year, Congress passed the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, to regulate the secondary market (general-public) trading of securities.

Credit Rating Agency Reform Act

Credit Rating Agency Reform Act of 2006
Enacted after being signed by President Bush on September 29, 2006, it amended the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 to require nationally recognized statistical rating organizations (NRSROs) to register with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Title 15 of the United States Code

15 U.S.C.: Commerce and Trade15 U.S.C.15 USC
Notable legislation in the title includes the Federal Trade Commission Act, the Clayton Antitrust Act, the Sherman Antitrust Act, the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Consumer Product Safety Act, and the CAN-SPAM Act of 2003.

Securities Acts Amendments of 1975

It was passed as a United States Public Law on June 4, 1975, and amended the Securities Act of 1933 ( et seq.) and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 ( et seq.).

Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act

Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection ActDodd-FrankDodd-Frank Act
The CFTC and SEC, consultating with the Federal Reserve, are charged with further defining swap related terms that appear in Commodity Exchange Act and section 3(a)(78) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

Garn–St. Germain Depository Institutions Act

Garn-St. Germain Depository Institutions ActGarn–St. Germain Depository Institutions Act of 1982

Gramm–Leach–Bliley Act

Gramm-Leach-Bliley ActGLBAFinancial Services Modernization Act

Commodity Futures Modernization Act of 2000

Commodity Futures Modernization ActCommodities Futures Modernization ActCommodity Futures Modernization

Secondary market

aftermarketsecondary tradingmarket for resale
Contrasted with the Securities Act of 1933, which regulates these original issues, the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 regulates the secondary trading of those securities between persons often unrelated to the issuer, frequently through brokers or dealers. The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (also called the Exchange Act, '34 Act, or 1934 Act) (, codified at et seq.) is a law governing the secondary trading of securities (stocks, bonds, and debentures) in the United States of America.