Self-archiving

green open accessself-archiveself-archivedarchiveself archivedepositdepositionopen-access repositoriespartial (green) open accessself archiving
Self-archiving is the act of (the author's) depositing a free copy of an electronic document online in order to provide open access to it.wikipedia
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Open-access repository

open access repositoriesopen access repositoryrepositories
The term usually refers to the self-archiving of peer-reviewed research journal and conference articles, as well as theses and book chapters, deposited in the author's own institutional repository or open archive for the purpose of maximizing its accessibility, usage and citation impact.
This is sometimes referred to as the self-archiving or "green" route to open access.

ArXiv

arXiv.orgArXiv.org e-print archivearXiv id
(later published in Association of Research Libraries ) although computer scientists had been practicing self-archiving in anonymous FTP archives since at least the 1980s (see CiteSeer) and physicists had been doing it since the early 1990s on the web (see arXiv).
In many fields of mathematics and physics, almost all scientific papers are self-archived on the arXiv repository.

Preprint

preprintspreprint serverpre-print
Therefore it may only be possible to self-archive the preprint of the article.
The word reprint refers to hard copies of papers that have already been published; reprints can be produced by the journal publisher, but can also be generated from digital versions (for example, from an electronic database of peer-reviewed journals), or from eprints self-archived by their authors in their institutional repositories.

Institutional repository

institutional repositoriesrepositoryrepositories
The term usually refers to the self-archiving of peer-reviewed research journal and conference articles, as well as theses and book chapters, deposited in the author's own institutional repository or open archive for the purpose of maximizing its accessibility, usage and citation impact.
Some of the main objectives for having an institutional repository are to provide open access to institutional research output by self-archiving in an open access repository, to create global visibility for an institution's scholarly research, and to store and preserve other institutional digital assets, including unpublished or otherwise easily lost ("grey") literature such as theses, working papers or technical reports.

Stevan Harnad

Hernád István RóbertScholarly skywritingSteven Harnad
Self-archiving was first explicitly proposed as a universal practice by Stevan Harnad in his 1994 online posting "Subversive Proposal"
Harnad, an active promoter of open access self-archiving and EPrints is currently Editor-in-Chief of the refereed journal Animal Sentience

Open-access mandate

open access mandateopen-access policypolicy
An open-access mandate is a policy adopted by a research institution, research funder, or government which requires researchers—usually university faculty or research staff and/or research grant recipients—to make their published, peer-reviewed journal articles and conference papers open access (1) by self-archiving their final, peer-reviewed drafts in a freely accessible institutional repository or disciplinary repository ("Green OA") or (2) by publishing them in an open-access journal ("Gold OA") or both.

Mendeley

Social reference management software websites such as Mendeley, Academia.edu, and ResearchGate facilitate sharing between researchers; however, these services are often subject to criticism for using scholars' contributions for commercial purposes as well as for copyright violation.
In 2012, Mendeley was one of the repositories for green Open Access recommended by Peter Suber.

Open access

open-accessopen access journalopen-access journal
Self-archiving is the act of (the author's) depositing a free copy of an electronic document online in order to provide open access to it.
Self-archiving by authors is permitted under green OA.

Postprint

postprints
Whereas the right to self-archive postprints is often a copyright matter (if the rights have been transferred to the publisher), the right to self-archive preprints is merely a question of journal policy.
Eprints were first deposited or self-archived in arbitrary websites and then harvested by virtual archives such as CiteSeer (and, more recently, Google Scholar), or they were deposited in central disciplinary archives such as arXiv or PubMed Central.

SHERPA/RoMEO

RoMEO
Some publishers attempt to impose embargoes on self-archiving; embargo-lengths can be from 6–12 months or longer after the date of publication (see SHERPA/RoMEO).
SHERPA/RoMEO is a service run by SHERPA to show the copyright and open access self-archiving policies of academic journals.

Cambridge University Press

CambridgeCUPUniversity Press
Publishers such as Cambridge University Press or the American Geophysical Union, endorse self-archiving of the final published version of the article, not just peer-reviewed final drafts.
It offers a range of Open Access publishing options under the heading of Cambridge Open, allowing authors to comply with the Gold Open Access and Green Open Access requirements of major research funders.

Academia.edu

Academia
Social reference management software websites such as Mendeley, Academia.edu, and ResearchGate facilitate sharing between researchers; however, these services are often subject to criticism for using scholars' contributions for commercial purposes as well as for copyright violation. They are also targeted by publishers for copyright compliance, such as when Elsevier (which purchased Mendeley) issued Digital Millennium Copyright Act takedown notices to Academia.edu for hosting scientific papers.
However, Academia.edu is not an open access repository and is not recommended as a way to pursue green open access by Peter Suber and experts, who instead invite researchers to use field-specific repositories or general-purpose repositories like Zenodo.

Open access in Portugal

Portugal
In Portugal, the first open access initiatives were carried out by the University of Minho with the creation of RepositóriUM in 2003 and the definition of an institutional policy of self-archiving in 2004.

Elsevier

Elsevier ScienceNorth-HollandJournal of Algorithms
They are also targeted by publishers for copyright compliance, such as when Elsevier (which purchased Mendeley) issued Digital Millennium Copyright Act takedown notices to Academia.edu for hosting scientific papers.
In 2013, Digimarc, a company representing Elsevier, told the University of Calgary to remove articles published by faculty authors on university web pages; although such self-archiving of academic articles may be legal under the fair dealing provisions in Canadian copyright law, the university complied.

Open access in Denmark

Denmark
In 2012 Denmark's main public funders of research began requiring that grantees deposit articles into open access digital repositories.

Open access in Poland

Poland
However, according to the OpenAIRE project, "the majority of these are digital libraries, providing access to the digitized content of library collections, not functioning as repositories open to authors for the deposition of their own work."

Electronic document

electronic documentsdigital documentdocuments
Self-archiving is the act of (the author's) depositing a free copy of an electronic document online in order to provide open access to it.

World Wide Web

WebWWWthe web
Self-archiving is the act of (the author's) depositing a free copy of an electronic document online in order to provide open access to it.

Peer review

peer-reviewedpeer-reviewpeer reviewed
The term usually refers to the self-archiving of peer-reviewed research journal and conference articles, as well as theses and book chapters, deposited in the author's own institutional repository or open archive for the purpose of maximizing its accessibility, usage and citation impact.

Citation impact

citation metricscitation countimpact
The term usually refers to the self-archiving of peer-reviewed research journal and conference articles, as well as theses and book chapters, deposited in the author's own institutional repository or open archive for the purpose of maximizing its accessibility, usage and citation impact.

Subversive Proposal

Self-archiving was first explicitly proposed as a universal practice by Stevan Harnad in his 1994 online posting "Subversive Proposal"

File Transfer Protocol

FTPFTP serverFTP client
(later published in Association of Research Libraries ) although computer scientists had been practicing self-archiving in anonymous FTP archives since at least the 1980s (see CiteSeer) and physicists had been doing it since the early 1990s on the web (see arXiv).

CiteSeerX

CiteSeerarticleCiteSeer X
(later published in Association of Research Libraries ) although computer scientists had been practicing self-archiving in anonymous FTP archives since at least the 1980s (see CiteSeer) and physicists had been doing it since the early 1990s on the web (see arXiv).

Copyright policies of academic publishers

Copyright policies of scientific publisherscopyright practicesjournal publishers' copyright agreements
A 2003 study analysed 80 journal publishers' copyright agreements and found that 90 percent of publishers asked for some form of copyright transfer and only 42.5 percent allowed self-archiving in some form.