Self-esteem

self-worthself-respectself esteemlow self-esteemself-confidenceesteemself respectlow self esteemself worthconfidence
Self-esteem is an individual's subjective evaluation of their own worth.wikipedia
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Self-concept

self-identityself-identificationego
Smith and Mackie (2007) defined it by saying "The self-concept is what we think about the self; self-esteem, is the positive or negative evaluations of the self, as in how we feel about it."
Self-concept also differs from self-esteem: self-concept is a cognitive or descriptive component of one's self (e.g. "I am a fast runner"), while self-esteem is evaluative and opinionated (e.g. "I feel good about being a fast runner").

Self-actualization

self-actualisationself actualizationself-actualize
Self-esteem then took a central role in personal self-actualization and in the treatment of psychic disorders.
According to Maslow, people have lower order needs that in general must be fulfilled before high order needs can be satisfied: 'five sets of needs – physiological, safety, belongingness, esteem, and finally self-actualization'.

Pride

arrogancearrogantproud
Self-esteem encompasses beliefs about oneself (for example, "I am unloved", "I am worthy") as well as emotional states, such as triumph, despair, pride, and shame.
As one might expect, Hubris is not necessarily associated with high self-esteem but with highly fluctuating or variable self-esteem.

Rosenberg self-esteem scale

Morris RosenbergRosenberg scale
In the mid-1960s, social psychologist Morris Rosenberg defined self-esteem as a feeling of self-worth and developed the Rosenberg self-esteem scale (RSES), which became the most-widely used scale to measure self-esteem in the social sciences.
The Rosenberg self-esteem scale (RSES), developed by the sociologist Morris Rosenberg, is a self-esteem measure widely used in social-science research.

Nathaniel Branden

Nathan Blumenthal
A leading figure of the movement, psychologist Nathaniel Branden, stated: "[I] cannot think of a single psychological problem – from anxiety and depression, to fear of intimacy or of success, to spouse battery or child molestation – that is not traced back to the problem of low self-esteem".
Nathaniel Branden (born Nathan Blumenthal; April 9, 1930 – December 3, 2014) was a Canadian–American psychotherapist and writer known for his work in the psychology of self-esteem.

Core self-evaluations

core self-evaluationCore Self-evaluations Modelself-evaluations
the core self-evaluations approach included self-esteem as one of four dimensions that comprise one's fundamental appraisal of oneself - along with locus of control, neuroticism, and self-efficacy.
The concept of core self-evaluations was first examined by Judge, Locke, and Durham (1997) and involves four personality dimensions: locus of control, neuroticism, generalized self-efficacy, and self-esteem.

Locus of control

Internal locus of controlcontrolLoss of control
the core self-evaluations approach included self-esteem as one of four dimensions that comprise one's fundamental appraisal of oneself - along with locus of control, neuroticism, and self-efficacy.
Locus of control is one of the four dimensions of core self-evaluations – one's fundamental appraisal of oneself – along with neuroticism, self-efficacy, and self-esteem.

National Association for Self-Esteem

National Council for Self-Esteem
The task force disbanded in 1995, and the National Council for Self-Esteem and later the National Association for Self-Esteem (NASE) was established, taking on the task force's mission.
The National Association for Self-Esteem (NASE) is an American organization devoted to promoting the importance of self-esteem.

John Vasconcellos

Concern about low self-esteem and its many presumed negative consequences led California assemblyman John Vasconcellos to work to set up and fund the Task Force on Self-Esteem and Personal and Social Responsibility in California in 1986.
His lifelong interest in psychology led to his advocacy of the self-esteem movement in California politics.

Self-love

Philautialove of selfrespect and love for themselves
See self-love for more on this.
In 1890, psychologist William James examined the concept of self esteem in his influential textbook Principles of Psychology.

Name-letter effect

Name Letter TaskName letter effect
These rely on indirect measures of cognitive processing thought to be linked to implicit self-esteem, including the Name Letter Task.
Most people like themselves; the name is associated with the self, and hence the letters of the name are preferred, despite the fact that they appear in many other words.

Terror management theory

death anxietyexistential threatmeaning maintenance model
According to Terror Management Theory, self-esteem serves a protective function and reduces anxiety about life and death.
Because cultural values determine that which is meaningful, they are also the foundation for self-esteem.

Motivation

intrinsic motivationmotivationalmotives
Many early theories suggested that self-esteem is a basic human need or motivation.

Neuroticism

neuroticneuroticallyadult neurotic
the core self-evaluations approach included self-esteem as one of four dimensions that comprise one's fundamental appraisal of oneself - along with locus of control, neuroticism, and self-efficacy.
Neuroticism has been included as one of the four dimensions that comprise core self-evaluations, one's fundamental appraisal of oneself, along with locus of control, self-efficacy, and self-esteem.

Implicit self-esteem

explicit self-esteem
These rely on indirect measures of cognitive processing thought to be linked to implicit self-esteem, including the Name Letter Task.
Both explicit and implicit self-esteem are constituents of self-esteem.

Belief

beliefsreligious beliefbelief system
Self-esteem encompasses beliefs about oneself (for example, "I am unloved", "I am worthy") as well as emotional states, such as triumph, despair, pride, and shame.

Perfectionism (psychology)

perfectionistperfectionismperfectionists
In its maladaptive form, perfectionism drives people to attempt to achieve unattainable ideals or unrealistic goals, often leading to depression and low self-esteem.

Sociometer

Sociometer theory maintains that self-esteem evolved to check one's level of status and acceptance in ones' social group.
Sociometer theory is a theory of self-esteem from an evolutionary psychological perspective which proposes that self-esteem is a gauge (or sociometer) of interpersonal relationships.

Envy

enviousphthonosconstant odds
Feelings of envy in this situation would occur in the forms of emotional pain, a lack of self-worth, and a lowered self-esteem and well-being.

Exaggeration

exaggeratedexaggerateexaggerations
Another form of cognitive exaggeration is inflation of the difficulty of achieving a goal after attaining it, possibly to improve self-esteem.

Self-confidence

self confidenceself-confidenttimidity
Although such individuals may outwardly exhibit great self-confidence, the underlying reality may be just the opposite: the apparent self-confidence is indicative of their heightened fear of anti-feats and the fragility of their self-esteem.
Self-confidence is not the same as self-esteem, which is an evaluation of one's own worth, whereas self-confidence is more specifically trust in one's ability to achieve some goal, which one meta-analysis suggested is similar to generalization of self-efficacy.

Narcissism

narcissisticnarcissistnarcissists
Narcissism is a disposition people may have that represents an excessive love for one's self.
Self-esteem works as a mediator between narcissism and psychological health.

Relationship-contingent self-esteem

Contingent self-esteem is derived from external sources, such as (a) what others say, (b) one's success or failure, (c) one's competence, or (d) relationship-contingent self-esteem.
Relationship contingent self-esteem (RCSE) is a type of self-esteem that derives from the outcomes, process, and nature of one's romantic relationship.

Major depressive disorder

depressionclinical depressionmajor depression
Bonet claims that this corresponds to Major depressive disorder.
It is often accompanied by low self-esteem, loss of interest in normally enjoyable activities, low energy, and pain without a clear cause.

Self-efficacy

self efficacyefficacypersonal change
the core self-evaluations approach included self-esteem as one of four dimensions that comprise one's fundamental appraisal of oneself - along with locus of control, neuroticism, and self-efficacy.
Furthermore, self-efficacy has been included as one of the four factors of core self-evaluation, one's fundamental appraisal of oneself, along with locus of control, neuroticism, and self-esteem.