Sense

sensesfive sensessensorysensory organssensationsensualitysense organsensualsense organssensory information
A sense is a physiological capacity of organisms that provides data for perception.wikipedia
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Perception

perceptualsensorysensory perception
A sense is a physiological capacity of organisms that provides data for perception.
Perception (from the Latin perceptio) is the organization, identification, and interpretation of sensory information in order to represent and understand the presented information, or the environment.

Nervous system

neuralnervousneurogenic
The nervous system has a specific sensory nervous system, and a sense organ, or sensor, dedicated to each sense.
The nervous system is a highly complex part of an animal that coordinates its actions and sensory information by transmitting signals to and from different parts of its body.

Olfaction

olfactorysmellsense of smell
Sight (vision, visual sense), hearing (audition, auditory sense), taste (gustation, gustatory sense), smell (olfaction, olfactory sense), and touch (somatosensation, somatosensory sense) are the five traditionally recognized senses.
Olfaction is a chemoreception that forms the sense of smell.

Sense of balance

balanceequilibrioceptionequilibrium
The ability to detect other stimuli beyond those governed by these most broadly recognized senses also exists, and these sensory modalities include temperature (thermoception), kinesthetic sense (proprioception), pain (nociception), balance (equilibrioception), vibration (mechanoreception), and various internal stimuli (e.g. the different chemoreceptors for detecting salt and carbon dioxide concentrations in the blood, or sense of hunger and sense of thirst). Balance, equilibrioception, or vestibular sense is the sense that allows an organism to sense body movement, direction, and acceleration, and to attain and maintain postural equilibrium and balance.
The sense of balance or equilibrioception is one of the physiological senses related to balance.

Thermoception

thermosensationtemperature sensecold temperature
The ability to detect other stimuli beyond those governed by these most broadly recognized senses also exists, and these sensory modalities include temperature (thermoception), kinesthetic sense (proprioception), pain (nociception), balance (equilibrioception), vibration (mechanoreception), and various internal stimuli (e.g. the different chemoreceptors for detecting salt and carbon dioxide concentrations in the blood, or sense of hunger and sense of thirst).
Thermoception or thermoreception is the sense by which an organism perceives temperature, or more accurately, temperature differences inferred from heat flux.

Stimulus modality

sensory modalitiesmodalitysensory modality
The ability to detect other stimuli beyond those governed by these most broadly recognized senses also exists, and these sensory modalities include temperature (thermoception), kinesthetic sense (proprioception), pain (nociception), balance (equilibrioception), vibration (mechanoreception), and various internal stimuli (e.g. the different chemoreceptors for detecting salt and carbon dioxide concentrations in the blood, or sense of hunger and sense of thirst).
Information from two or more senses is encountered.

Magnetoreception

magnetoceptionmagnetic senseavian compass
Magnetoception (or magnetoreception) is the ability to detect the direction one is facing based on the Earth's magnetic field.
Magnetoreception (also magnetoception) is a sense which allows an organism to detect a magnetic field to perceive direction, altitude or location.

Philosophy of perception

perceptionperceiveperceived reality
The senses and their operation, classification, and theory are overlapping topics studied by a variety of fields, most notably neuroscience, cognitive psychology (or cognitive science), and philosophy of perception.

Stimulus (psychology)

stimulusstimuliresponse
Some animals may also intake and interpret sensory stimuli in very different ways.

Cognitive science

cognitive scientistcognitive sciencescognitive
The senses and their operation, classification, and theory are overlapping topics studied by a variety of fields, most notably neuroscience, cognitive psychology (or cognitive science), and philosophy of perception.
Perception is the ability to take in information via the senses, and process it in some way.

Taste

sourbittergustatory
Sight (vision, visual sense), hearing (audition, auditory sense), taste (gustation, gustatory sense), smell (olfaction, olfactory sense), and touch (somatosensation, somatosensory sense) are the five traditionally recognized senses.
Taste, gustatory perception, or gustation (Adjectival form: gustatory) is one of the five traditional senses that belongs to the gustatory system.

Hearing

auditoryauralauditory perception
Sight (vision, visual sense), hearing (audition, auditory sense), taste (gustation, gustatory sense), smell (olfaction, olfactory sense), and touch (somatosensation, somatosensory sense) are the five traditionally recognized senses. Hearing or audition (adjectival form: auditory) is the sense of sound perception.
It is one of the traditional five senses; partial or total inability to hear is called hearing loss.

Ageusia

loss of tasteAguesialoses her sense of taste
The inability to taste is called ageusia.
It is sometimes confused with anosmia – a loss of the sense of smell.

Sound

audiosound wavesound waves
Hearing or audition (adjectival form: auditory) is the sense of sound perception.
In this case, sound is a sensation.

Thermoreceptor

thermoreceptorstemperatureWarmth receptors
The thermoceptors in the skin are quite different from the homeostatic thermoceptors in the brain (hypothalamus), which provide feedback on internal body temperature.
A thermoreceptor is a non-specialised sense receptor, or more accurately the receptive portion of a sensory neuron, that codes absolute and relative changes in temperature, primarily within the innocuous range.

Otolith

otolithsotoconiaotolith organs
The vestibular nerve also conducts information from the utricle and the saccule, which contain hair-like sensory receptors that bend under the weight of otoliths (which are small crystals of calcium carbonate) that provide the inertia needed to detect head rotation, linear acceleration, and the direction of gravitational force.
They are sensitive to gravity and linear acceleration.

Interoception

interoceptivesense
Interoception is contemporarily defined as the sense of the internal state of the body.

Hunger (motivational state)

hungersatietycontrol of food intake
Hunger and satiety are sensations.

Sensory nervous system

sensory systemsensorysensory organ
The nervous system has a specific sensory nervous system, and a sense organ, or sensor, dedicated to each sense.
The sensory nervous system is a part of the nervous system responsible for processing sensory information.

Balance (ability)

balancebalancingPostural sway
Balance, equilibrioception, or vestibular sense is the sense that allows an organism to sense body movement, direction, and acceleration, and to attain and maintain postural equilibrium and balance.
Age-related decline in the ability of the above systems to receive and integrate sensory information contributes to poor balance in older adults.

Vomeronasal organ

Jacobson's organvomeronasalVomeronasal system
Many animals (salamanders, reptiles, mammals) have a vomeronasal organ that is connected with the mouth cavity.
The vomeronasal organ (VNO), or Jacobson's organ, is the paired auxiliary olfactory (smell) sense organ located in the soft tissue of the nasal septum, in the nasal cavity just above the roof of the mouth (the hard palate).

Human nose

nosenasalala of the nose
Olfactory receptor neurons in the nose differ from most other neurons in that they die and regenerate on a regular basis.
It contains an area of specialised cells, olfactory receptor neurons responsible for the sense of smell (olfaction).

Lateral line

lateral line systemneuromastpore
The lateral line, also called lateral line system (LLS) or lateral line organ (LLO), is a system of sense organs found in aquatic vertebrates, used to detect movement, vibration, and pressure gradients in the surrounding water.

Seismic communication

vibrational communicationdetect movements or vibrationsseismo-acoustic communication
Sound can also be detected as vibrations conducted through the body by tactition.

Recognition memory

recognitiondual process modelForced choice recognition
Recognition memory is sometimes divided into two functions by neuroscientists: familiarity and recollection.
Recognition memory is not confined to the visual domain; we can recognize things in each of the five traditional sensory modalities (i.e. sight, hearing, touch, smell, and taste).