Sepal

calyxsepalscalycescalyx tubecalyxescalices calyxcalixcalyceCalyx (botany)
A sepal ( or ) is a part of the flower of angiosperms (flowering plants).wikipedia
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Flower

flowersfloralflowering
A sepal ( or ) is a part of the flower of angiosperms (flowering plants).

Petal

corollapetalscorollas
Usually green, sepals typically function as protection for the flower in bud, and often as support for the petals when in bloom.
Petals are usually accompanied by another set of special leaves called sepals, that collectively form the calyx and lie just beneath the corolla.

Whorl (botany)

whorlswhorlwhorled
Collectively the sepals are called the calyx (plural calyces), the outermost whorl of parts that form a flower.
In botany, a whorl or verticil is an arrangement of leaves, sepals, petals, stamens, or carpels that radiate from a single point and surround or wrap around the stem or stalk.

Physalis

ground cherrygroundcherrybluebottles
This is an effective protection against some kinds of birds and insects, for example in Hibiscus trionum and the Cape gooseberry.
A notable feature is the formation of a large papery husk derived from the calyx, which partly or fully encloses the fruit.

Perianth

perianth tubecoronaperigone
The calyx (the sepals) and the corolla (the petals) are the outer sterile whorls of the flower, which together form what is known as the perianth.
The perianth (perigonium, perigon or perigone) is the non-reproductive part of the flower, and structure that forms an envelope surrounding the sexual organs, consisting of the calyx (sepals) and the corolla (petals).

Tepal

tepalsperigoneperianth
The term tepal is usually applied when the parts of the perianth are difficult to distinguish, e.g. the petals and sepals share the same color, or the petals are absent and the sepals are colorful.
The term is used when these parts cannot easily be classified as either sepals or petals.

Accessory fruit

anthocarpfalse fruitaccessory
In other species, the calyx grows into an accessory fruit.
Examples of accessory tissue are the receptacle of the strawberry, pineapple, common fig, and mulberry, and the calyx of Gaultheria procumbens or Syzygium jambos.

Tulip

tulipsTulipatulip bulb
Examples of plants in which the term tepal is appropriate include genera such as Aloe and Tulipa.
The two whorls represent three petals and three sepals, but are termed tepals because they are nearly identical.

Rose

Rosarosesred rose
In contrast, genera such as Rosa and Phaseolus have well-distinguished sepals and petals.
Beneath the petals are five sepals (or in the case of some Rosa sericea, four).

Tomatillo

tomatillosPhysalis philadelphicaPhysalis ixocarpa
Examples include species of Acaena, some of the Solanaceae (for example the Tomatillo, Physalis philadelphica), and the water caltrop, Trapa natans.
The tomatillo fruit is surrounded by an inedible, paper-like husk formed from the calyx. As the fruit matures, it fills the husk and can split it open by harvest.

Merosity

4-merouspentamerousmerous
The number of sepals in a flower is its merosity.
It is most commonly used in the context of flowers where it refers to the number of sepals in a whorl of the calyx, the number of petals in a whorl of the corolla, the number of stamens in a whorl of the androecium, or the number of carpels in a whorl of the gynoecium.

Flowering plant

Angiospermsflowering plantsangiosperm
A sepal ( or ) is a part of the flower of angiosperms (flowering plants).
The individual members of these surrounding structures are known as sepals and petals (or tepals in flowers such as Magnolia where sepals and petals are not distinguishable from each other).

Monocotyledon

Monocotsmonocotmonocotyledonous
The merosity of a monocot or palaeodicot flower is three, or a multiple of three.
In nearly all cases the perigone consists of two alternating trimerous whorls of tepals, being homochlamydeous, without differentiation between calyx and corolla.

Hypanthium

floral cupflower cupfloral tube
In other flowers (e.g., Rosaceae, Myrtaceae) a hypanthium includes the bases of sepals, petals, and the attachment points of the stamens.
In angiosperms, a hypanthium or floral cup is a structure where basal portions of the calyx, the corolla, and the stamens form a cup-shaped tube.

Fruit

fruitsfruitingfresh fruit
Most often such structures protrude until the fruit is mature and falls off.
In some fruits, especially simple fruits derived from an inferior ovary, other parts of the flower (such as the floral tube, including the petals, sepals, and stamens), fuse with the ovary and ripen with it.

Lythraceae

loosestrife familyDecodonpomegranate tree
In some flowers, the sepals are fused towards the base, forming a calyx tube (as in the Lythraceae family, and Fabaceae).
Botanically, the leaves are usually in pairs (opposite), and the flower petals emerge from the rim of the calyx tube.

Fabaceae

Leguminosaelegume familylegume
In some flowers, the sepals are fused towards the base, forming a calyx tube (as in the Lythraceae family, and Fabaceae).
The flowers often have five generally fused sepals and five free petals.

Noël Martin Joseph de Necker

Neck.NeckerNoel Martin Joseph de Necker
The term sepalum was coined by Noël Martin Joseph de Necker in 1790, and derived from the Greek σκέπη, a covering.

Ancient Greek

GreekClassical GreekGr.
The term sepalum was coined by Noël Martin Joseph de Necker in 1790, and derived from the Greek σκέπη, a covering.

Acaena

Acaena anserinifoliapiripiri
Examples include species of Acaena, some of the Solanaceae (for example the Tomatillo, Physalis philadelphica), and the water caltrop, Trapa natans.

Solanaceae

nightshadenightshade familysolanaceous
Examples include species of Acaena, some of the Solanaceae (for example the Tomatillo, Physalis philadelphica), and the water caltrop, Trapa natans.

Water caltrop

TrapaTrapa natansTrapaceae
Examples include species of Acaena, some of the Solanaceae (for example the Tomatillo, Physalis philadelphica), and the water caltrop, Trapa natans.

Hibiscus trionum

Hibiscus africanus
This is an effective protection against some kinds of birds and insects, for example in Hibiscus trionum and the Cape gooseberry.

Morphology (biology)

morphologymorphologicalmorphologically
Morphologically, both sepals and petals are modified leaves.

Lilioid monocots

lilioid monocotpetaloid monocotsPetaloidea
When the undifferentiated tepals resemble petals, they are referred to as "petaloid", as in petaloid monocots, orders of monocots with brightly coloured tepals.