Sept

septsfamiliaChief of the SeptClan Septs:followedIrish septsliocht
A sept is an English word for a division of a family, especially of a Scottish or Irish family.wikipedia
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Scottish clan

clanclansScottish clans
A sept is an English word for a division of a family, especially of a Scottish or Irish family.
A clan also included a large group of loosely related septs – dependent families – all of whom looked to the clan chief as their head and their protector.

Martin (name)

MartinMartínMartin family
According to the Oxford Companion to Scottish History, the MacMartins of Letterfinlay who were a sept of the Clan Cameron would have seen themselves as distinct within their own lands, but would have also seen themselves as Camerons if operating elsewhere outside Lochaber.
The MacMartins, who became a sept of Clan Cameron, are said to have been amongst the most loyal and valuable followers of Cameron of Lochiel.

Clan Cameron

CameronCameronsCameron of Lochiel
According to the Oxford Companion to Scottish History, the MacMartins of Letterfinlay who were a sept of the Clan Cameron would have seen themselves as distinct within their own lands, but would have also seen themselves as Camerons if operating elsewhere outside Lochaber. For example, the surname Miller/Millar was made a sept of Clan MacFarlane, and Taylor of Clan Cameron.
The MacMartins, a sept of Clan Cameron, are said to have been amongst the most loyal and valuable followers of Lochiel.

Mac Amhlaoibh and Mac Amhalghaidh (Irish septs)

a particular familyMac Amhlaoibh and Mac AmhalghaidhMacAmhalgaidhe
These Gaelic names are borne by at least three unrelated native Irish clans or septs (a division or part of a clan).

Tudor conquest of Ireland

Tudor conquestTudor reconquest of IrelandEnglish rule in Ireland
Brehon Law, the ancient legal system of Ireland clearly defined the clan system in pre-Norman Ireland, with its electoral system limited to the senior sept's members (see derbfine), which collapsed after the Tudor Conquest in the 16th century.
Among the most important septs were the O'Neills (Uí Néill) in central Ulster (Tír Eóghain)—flanked to their west by the O'Donnells (Ua Domnaill)—the O'Byrnes (Ua Bróin) and O'Tooles (Ua Tuathail) in County Wicklow, the Kavanaghs (Ua Caomhánach) in County Wexford, the MacCarthys (Mac Cárthaigh) and O'Sullivans (Ua Súilleabháin) in County Cork and County Kerry and the O'Brien (Ó Briain) lordship of Thomond in County Clare.

Sippe

sibbclanextended family
The Sippe came to be a cognatic, extended family unit, exactly analogous to the Scottish/Irish sept.

List of Irish clans

BresailClan DrugainIrish
A sept is an English word for a division of a family, especially of a Scottish or Irish family.

Scotland

Scottish🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿Scots
The term is used in both Scotland and Ireland, where it may be translated as sliocht, meaning "progeny" or "seed", which may indicate the descendants of a person (for example, Sliocht Bhriain Mhic Dhiarmada, "the descendant of Brian MacDermott").

Ireland

IrishIRLisland of Ireland
The term is used in both Scotland and Ireland, where it may be translated as sliocht, meaning "progeny" or "seed", which may indicate the descendants of a person (for example, Sliocht Bhriain Mhic Dhiarmada, "the descendant of Brian MacDermott").

Latin

Latin languageLat.la
The word may derive from the Latin saeptum, meaning "enclosure" or "fold", or via an alteration of "sect".

Anglicisation

anglicisedanglicizedanglicization
Síol is a Gaelic word meaning "progeny" or "seed" that is used in the context of a family or clan with members who bear the same surname and inhabited the same territory, as a manner of distinguishing one group from another; a family called Mac an Bháird (anglicised as "Ward") might be divided into septs such as Síol Sheáin Mhic Bhriain, Síol Chonchobhair Óig, Síol Sheáin Chuinn, or Síol Chon Chonnacht.

Laird

lairdslairdshipScottish lairds
A sept might follow another chief if two families were linked through marriage, or, if a family lived on the land of a powerful laird, they would follow him whether they were related or not.

Manrent

bond of manrentBonds of manrentbond of friendship
Bonds of manrent were sometimes used to bind lesser chiefs and his followers to more powerful chiefs.

Tartan

plaidclan tartantartans
Such lists date back to the 19th century, when clan societies and tartan manufacturers attempted to capitalise on the enthusiasm and interest for all things Scottish.

Lists of most common surnames

List of most common surnamesmost common surnamemost common surnames
Also, common surnames, found throughout the British Isles, were linked to particular clans.

British Isles

BritainBritishThe British Isles
Also, common surnames, found throughout the British Isles, were linked to particular clans.

Miller (surname)

Miller (name)MillerMillers
For example, the surname Miller/Millar was made a sept of Clan MacFarlane, and Taylor of Clan Cameron.

Clan MacFarlane

MacfarlaneMacFarlanesMacFarland Clan
For example, the surname Miller/Millar was made a sept of Clan MacFarlane, and Taylor of Clan Cameron.

Taylor (surname)

TaylorTaylorssurname Taylor
For example, the surname Miller/Millar was made a sept of Clan MacFarlane, and Taylor of Clan Cameron.

Patronymic

patronymibnbin
Furthermore, patronymic forms of common personal names were also linked to particular clans.

Personal name

full namepersonal namesEastern name order
Furthermore, patronymic forms of common personal names were also linked to particular clans.

Ó Néill dynasty

O'Neill dynastyO'NeillO'Neills
The English word "sept" is most accurate in referring to a subgroup within a large clan, particularly when that group has taken up residence outside their clan's original territory (e.g. the O'Neills, MacSweeneys, and O'Connors).

Clan Sweeney

Clann SuibhneMacSweensClan MacSween
The English word "sept" is most accurate in referring to a subgroup within a large clan, particularly when that group has taken up residence outside their clan's original territory (e.g. the O'Neills, MacSweeneys, and O'Connors).

O'Conor

O'Conor DonÓ Conchubhair DonnÓ Conchubhair
The English word "sept" is most accurate in referring to a subgroup within a large clan, particularly when that group has taken up residence outside their clan's original territory (e.g. the O'Neills, MacSweeneys, and O'Connors).

Irish clans

Irish clanclanclans
Related Irish clans often belong to larger groups, dynasties, such as the Dál gCais, Uí Néill, Uí Fiachrach, and Uí Maine.