Septimania

GothiaMarch of GothiaGothic MarchDuke of SeptimaniaMarca GothicaMarquisat of Gothia
Septimania (Septimanie, ; Septimània, ; Septimània, ) is a historical region in modern-day south of France.wikipedia
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Visigoths

VisigothicVisigothGothic
It referred to the western part of the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis that passed to the control of the Visigoths in 462, when Septimania was ceded to their king, Theodoric II.
After that, the Visigoth kingdom was limited to Hispania, and they never again held territory north of the Pyrenees other than Septimania.

March (territorial entity)

marchmarchesMark
Septimania became a march of the Carolingian Empire and then West Francia down to the thirteenth century, though it was culturally and politically autonomous from northern France based central royal government.
After some early setbacks, Charlemagne's son Louis ventured beyond the province of Septimania and took Barcelona from the Moorish emir in 801.

Gallia Narbonensis

Transalpine GaulGallia TransalpinaTransalpine
It referred to the western part of the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis that passed to the control of the Visigoths in 462, when Septimania was ceded to their king, Theodoric II.
The western region of Gallia Narbonensis was known as Septimania.

County of Toulouse

ToulouseCounts of ToulouseTolosa
The region was under the influence of the people from the count territories of Toulouse, Provence, and ancient County of Barcelona.
At times, the Counts of Toulouse or family members were also Counts of Quercy, Rouergue, Albi, Nîmes, Provence and Marquess of Gothia.

County of Barcelona

BarcelonaCount of BarcelonaCatalonia
The region was under the influence of the people from the count territories of Toulouse, Provence, and ancient County of Barcelona.
This was achieved by taking over the territories of Septimania that the Moors invaded in the 8th century and from these, those territories surrounding the Pyrenees and specially the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula.

Villeneuve-lès-Maguelone

MagueloneMaguelonneSextantio
Another possible derivation of the name is in reference to the seven cities (civitates) of the territory: Béziers, Elne, Agde, Narbonne, Lodève, Maguelonne, and Nîmes.
Maguelone (or Maguelon) was one of the "seven cities" that may have been the origin of the name for the region called Septimania.

Languedoc-Roussillon

LanguedocLanguedoc-Roussillon regionRoussillon
Under the Visigoths it was known as simply Gallia or Narbonensis. Septimania territory roughly corresponds with the former administrative region of Languedoc-Roussillon that merged into the new administrative region of Occitanie.
Thus, he wanted to rename the region "Septimanie" (Septimania).

Toulouse

TolosaToulouse, FranceToulousain
Sidonius Apollinaris refers to Septimania as "theirs" during the reign of Avitus (455–456), but Sidonius is probably considering Visigothic settlement of and around Toulouse.
The Frankish conquest of Septimania followed in the 750s, and a quasi-independent County of Toulouse emerged within the Carolingian sub-kingdom of Aquitaine by the late 8th century.

Nîmes

NemausushistoryNamausus
Another possible derivation of the name is in reference to the seven cities (civitates) of the territory: Béziers, Elne, Agde, Narbonne, Lodève, Maguelonne, and Nîmes.
By 725, the Muslim Umayyads had conquered the whole Visigothic territory of Septimania including Nîmes.

Narbonne

NarboNarbo MartiusNarbona
Another possible derivation of the name is in reference to the seven cities (civitates) of the territory: Béziers, Elne, Agde, Narbonne, Lodève, Maguelonne, and Nîmes. The Arabs, under Al-Samh ibn Malik, the governor-general of al-Andalus, sweeping up the Iberian peninsula, by 719 overran Septimania; al-Samh set up his capital from 720 at Narbonne, which the Moors called "Arbuna", offering the still largely Arianist Christian inhabitants generous terms and quickly pacifying the other cities. Clovis defeated the Goths in the Battle of Vouillé and the child-king Amalaric was carried for safety into Iberia while Gesalec was elected to replace him and rule from Narbonne.
It was subsequently the capital of the Visigothic province of Septimania, the only territory from Gaul to fend off the Frankish thrust after the Battle of Vouille (507).

Theodoric II

Theoderic IITheodoricTheodoric II of the Ostrogoths
It referred to the western part of the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis that passed to the control of the Visigoths in 462, when Septimania was ceded to their king, Theodoric II.
In late 458 the Western Roman Emperor, Majorian entered Septimania to attack Theodoric and reclaim the province for the empire.

Elne

ElnaIlliberisCastrum Helenae
Another possible derivation of the name is in reference to the seven cities (civitates) of the territory: Béziers, Elne, Agde, Narbonne, Lodève, Maguelonne, and Nîmes.
Within its walls was assassinated Constans, the son of Constantine in 350 A.D. With the division of southern Gaul in 462, Elne became one of the "seven cities" of Septimania.

Liuvigild

LeovigildKing LeovigildSiege of Seville (583)
In the Visigothic kingdom, which became centred on Toledo by the end of the reign of Leovigild, the province of Gallia Narbonensis, usually shortened to just Gallia or Narbonensis and never called Septimania, was both an administrative province of the central royal government and an ecclesiastical province whose metropolitan was the Archbishop of Narbonne.
undefined 519 – 21 April 586) was a Visigothic King of Hispania and Septimania from 568 to April 21, 586.

Carcassonne

CarcasoCarcassonaisCarcassonne, France
The attempt to take Carcassonne, a fortified site guarding the Septimanian coast, was defeated by the Ostrogoths (508) and Septimania thereafter remained in Visigothic hands, though the Burgundians managed to hold Narbonne for a time and drive Gesalec into exile.
In 462 the Romans officially ceded Septimania to the Visigothic king Theodoric II who had held Carcassonne since 453.

Reccared I

ReccaredRecared
The Frankish attack of 585 was repulsed by Hermenegild's brother Reccared, who was ruling Narbonensis as a sub-king.
undefined 559 – 31 May 601 AD; reigned 586–601) was Visigothic King of Hispania and Septimania.

Wamba (king)

WambaKing Wamba
It is only in the time of Wamba (reigned 672-680) and Julian of Toledo, however, that a large Jewish population becomes evident in Septimania: Julian referred to it as a "brothel of blaspheming Jews."
During his reign, the Visigothic kingdom encompassed all of Hispania and part of southern Gaul known as Septimania.

Liuva I

Liuva
When Liuva I succeeded the throne in 568, Septimania was a dangerous frontier province and Iberia was wracked by revolts.
Liuva I (died 571 or 572) was a Visigothic King of Hispania and Septimania.

Al-Andalus

AndalusianIslamic SpainMuslim Spain
The Arabs, under Al-Samh ibn Malik, the governor-general of al-Andalus, sweeping up the Iberian peninsula, by 719 overran Septimania; al-Samh set up his capital from 720 at Narbonne, which the Moors called "Arbuna", offering the still largely Arianist Christian inhabitants generous terms and quickly pacifying the other cities. Following the conquest, al-Andalus was divided into five administrative areas, roughly corresponding to present Andalusia, Galicia and Lusitania, Castile and Léon, Aragon and Catalonia, and the ancient province of Septimania.
At its greatest geographical extent, it occupied the northwest of the Iberian peninsula and a part of present day southern France Septimania (8th century) and for nearly a century (9th–10th centuries) extended its control from Fraxinet over the Alpine passes which connect Italy with the remainder of Western Europe.

Visigothic Kingdom

VisigothsVisigothicKing
Coinage of the Visigothic kingdom of Hispania did not circulate in Gaul outside of Septimania and Frankish coinage did not circulate in the Visigothic kingdom, including Septimania.
Sometimes referred to as the regnum Tolosanum or Kingdom of Toulouse after its capital Toulouse in modern historiography, the kingdom lost much of its territory in Gaul to the Franks in the early 6th century, save the narrow coastal strip of Septimania, but the Visigoth control of Iberia was secured by the end of that century with the submission of the Suebi.

Western Roman Empire

Western EmpireWesternWest
Under Theodoric II, the Visigoths settled in Aquitaine as foederati of the Western Roman Empire (450s).
After their conquest of Soissons, the Franks defeated the Alemanni in 504 and conquered all Visigothic territory north of the Pyrenees other than Septimania in 507.

Battle of Vouillé

battle of Campus Vogladensisconqueredconquest by the Franks
Clovis defeated the Goths in the Battle of Vouillé and the child-king Amalaric was carried for safety into Iberia while Gesalec was elected to replace him and rule from Narbonne.
The battle forced the Visigoths to retreat to Septimania, which they continued to hold, while the success at Vouillé allowed the Franks to control the southwestern part of France and capture Toulouse.

Catalonia

CatalanCatalansAutonomous Community of Catalonia
Following the conquest, al-Andalus was divided into five administrative areas, roughly corresponding to present Andalusia, Galicia and Lusitania, Castile and Léon, Aragon and Catalonia, and the ancient province of Septimania.
In the late 8th century, the counties of the March of Gothia and the Hispanic March were established by the Frankish kingdom as feudal vassals across and near the eastern Pyrenees as a defensive barrier against Muslim invasions.

Ingund (wife of Hermenegild)

IngundInguldIngundis
During the revolt of Hermenegild (583–585) against his father Leovigild, Septimania was invaded by Guntram, King of Burgundy, possible in support of Hermenegild's revolt, since the latter was married to his niece Ingundis.
In 569 Leovigild was elevated to co-rule the Visigoths in Hispania and Septimania with his brother Liuva.

Béziers

BaeterraeBaetiraeBézier
The name "Septimania" may derive from part of the Roman name of the city of Béziers, Colonia Julia Septimanorum Beaterrae, which in turn alludes to the settlement of veterans of the Roman VII Legion in the city.
Septimania

Guntram

King GuntramGontramGontran
During the revolt of Hermenegild (583–585) against his father Leovigild, Septimania was invaded by Guntram, King of Burgundy, possible in support of Hermenegild's revolt, since the latter was married to his niece Ingundis.
Supposed to take place on 4 July, the feast of St. Martin of Tours, in Orléans, it did not and Gontrand turned to invade Septimania.