Serekh

serekh nameserekh-nameHorus-nameO33srḫ
A serekh was a specific important type of heraldic crest used in ancient Egypt.wikipedia
61 Related Articles

Heraldry

heraldicheraldistarms
A serekh was a specific important type of heraldic crest used in ancient Egypt.
The earliest representations of distinct persons and regions in Egyptian art show the use of standards topped with the images or symbols of various gods, and the names of kings appear upon emblems known as serekhs, representing the king's palace, and usually topped with a falcon representing the god Horus, of whom the king was regarded as the earthly incarnation.

Set animal

SalawaSet-animalSeth animal
Additionally, the falcon of the god Horus, or in a few cases the Set animal, topped the serekh, showing the celestial patron of the named king.
It was soon thereafter portrayed mounted upon the serekhs of Seth-Peribsen and Khasekhemwy.

Cartouche

cartouchescartouchcartouche name
Like the later cartouche, it contained a royal name.

Pharaoh

PharaohsPharaonicking
A serekh was normally used as a royal crest, accentuating and honouring the name of the pharaoh.
The name was written within a square frame representing the palace, named a serekh.

Horus

HaroerisHorus the ElderHarakhti
Additionally, the falcon of the god Horus, or in a few cases the Set animal, topped the serekh, showing the celestial patron of the named king.
2890–2686 BCE), Pharaoh Seth-Peribsen used the Set animal to writing his serekh name in place of the falcon hieroglyph representing Horus.

Horus name

Horus
However, modern Egyptologists and linguists are starting to prefer the more neutral term: the "serekh name".

Ancient Egypt

EgyptEgyptianAncient Egyptian
A serekh was a specific important type of heraldic crest used in ancient Egypt.

Vignette (graphic design)

vignettevignettes
A serekh was an ornamental vignette combining a view of a palace facade and a plan (top view) of the royal courtyard.

Floor plan

floorplanfloor plansplan
A serekh was an ornamental vignette combining a view of a palace facade and a plan (top view) of the royal courtyard.

Facade

façadefacadesfaçades
The word "serekh" derives from the Egyptian word for "facade".

Gerzeh culture

Naqada IIGerzehGerzean
Its use can be dated back as early as the Gerzeh culture (ca.

Old Kingdom of Egypt

Old KingdomOldOld Kingdom period
From the Old Kingdom period onward, the first uses of the full written word appear in old papyri.

Seth-Peribsen

PeribsenSeth Peribsen
Seth-Peribsen (also known as Ash-Peribsen, Peribsen and Perabsen) is the serekh name of an early Egyptian monarch (pharaoh), who ruled during the Second Dynasty of Egypt (c.

Sneferka

Sneferka is the serekh-name of an early Egyptian king who may have ruled at the end of the 1st dynasty.

Ba (pharaoh)

Horus BaHorus-Ba
Ba, also known as Horus Ba, is the serekh-name of an early Egyptian or ancient Egyptian king who may have ruled at the end of the 1st dynasty, the latter part of 2nd dynasty or during the 3rd dynasty.

Horus Bird (pharaoh)

Horus BirdHorus "Bird
Horus Bird, also known as Horus-Ba, is the serekh-name of a pharaoh who may have had a very short reign between the 1st dynasty and 2nd dynasty of Egypt.

Scorpion II

King ScorpionScorpionScorpion King
Most linguists and Egyptologists read it Neb (for 'lord') or Nesw (for 'king'), and they are convinced that the golden rosette was some kind of forerunner to the later serekh.

Neithhotep

She was once thought to be a male ruler: her outstandingly large mastaba and the royal serekh surrounding her name on several seal impressions previously led Egyptologists and historians to the erroneous belief that she may have been an unknown king.

Narmer Macehead

31st century BC) whose serekh is engraved on it.

Art of ancient Egypt

Ancient Egyptian artEgyptian artEgyptian
Naqada III is notable for being the first era with hieroglyphs (though this is disputed by some), the first regular use of serekhs, the first irrigation, and the first appearance of royal cemeteries.

Naqada III

Protodynastic PeriodProtodynastic Period of EgyptDynasty 0
In this period, those kings' names were inscribed in the form of serekhs on a variety of surfaces including pottery and tombs.

Sekhemib-Perenmaat

Sekhemib
Sekhemib's serekh name is unusual, because it is the first in Egyptian history that was extended by an epithet.

Khaba

Hudjefa II
The bowls were found mostly intact; they show only the king's serekh name on their polished surfaces.