Serial (literature)

serialserializedfascicleserialsserialisedserial novelfasciclesserializationserial formserialized novel
In literature, a serial is a printing format by which a single larger work, often a work of narrative fiction, is published in smaller, sequential installments.wikipedia
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Periodical literature

periodicalperiodicalsperiodical publication
The installments are also known as numbers, parts or fascicles, and may be released either as separate publications or within sequential issues of a periodical publication, such as a magazine or newspaper.
Periodical literature (also called a periodical publication or simply a periodical) is a category of serial publications that appear in a new edition on a regular schedule.

Charles Dickens

DickensDickensianDickens, Charles
The wild success of Charles Dickens's The Pickwick Papers, first published in 1836, is widely considered to have established the viability and appeal of the serialized format within periodical literature.
His novels, most published in monthly or weekly instalments, pioneered the serial publication of narrative fiction, which became the dominant Victorian mode for novel publication.

The Moonstone

Moonstonenovel
Other famous writers who wrote serial literature for popular magazines were Wilkie Collins, inventor of the detective novel with The Moonstone and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who created the Sherlock Holmes stories originally for serialization in The Strand magazine.
The story was originally serialised in Charles Dickens's magazine All the Year Round.

The Pickwick Papers

Pickwick PapersPickwickThe Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club
The wild success of Charles Dickens's The Pickwick Papers, first published in 1836, is widely considered to have established the viability and appeal of the serialized format within periodical literature.
Written for publication as a serial, The Pickwick Papers is a sequence of loosely related adventures.

Alexandre Dumas

Alexandre Dumas, pèreDumasAlexander Dumas
In France, Alexandre Dumas and Eugène Sue were masters of the serialized genre.
Many of his historical novels of high adventure were originally published as serials, including The Count of Monte Cristo, The Three Musketeers, Twenty Years After, and The Vicomte of Bragelonne: Ten Years Later.

Eugène Sue

Eugene SueSueJoseph Marie Eugène Sue
In France, Alexandre Dumas and Eugène Sue were masters of the serialized genre.
He was one of several authors who popularized the genre of the serial novel in France with his very popular and widely imitated The Mysteries of Paris, which was published in a newspaper from 1842 to 1843.

The Three Musketeers

Three MusketeersnovelLes trois mousquetaires
The Three Musketeers and The Count of Monte Cristo each appeared as a feuilleton.
The Three Musketeers was first published in serial form in the newspaper Le Siècle between March and July 1844.

Feuilleton

feuilletonsroman-feuilletonFeuilleton section
The Three Musketeers and The Count of Monte Cristo each appeared as a feuilleton.
In English newspapers, the term instead came to refer to an installment of a serial story printed in one part of a newspaper.

The Doll (novel)

The DollLalkaThe Doll'' (novel)
In Poland, Bolesław Prus wrote several serialized novels: The Outpost (1885–86), The Doll (1887–89), The New Woman (1890–93), and his sole historical novel, Pharaoh (the latter, exceptionally, written entire over a year's time in 1894–95 and serialized only after completion, in 1895–96).
It was composed for periodical serialization in 1887-89 and appeared in book form in 1890.

Die Gartenlaube

Gartenlaube
In the German-speaking countries, the serialized novel was widely popularized by the weekly family magazine Die Gartenlaube, which reached a circulation of 382,000 by 1875.
After the magazine introduced serialized novels, its paid circulation increased dramatically, rising to 160,000 by 1863 and 382,000 by 1875.

The Nine-tailed Turtle

Nine-tailed TurtleNine-tailed Turtles
The Nine-tailed Turtle was serialized from 1906 to 1910.
It was serialized from 1906 to 1910 and has 192 chapters, making it one of the longest novels produced in China's late Qing Dynasty and the early Republican eras.

Wilkie Collins

William Wilkie CollinsCollins, WilkieCollins’
Other famous writers who wrote serial literature for popular magazines were Wilkie Collins, inventor of the detective novel with The Moonstone and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who created the Sherlock Holmes stories originally for serialization in The Strand magazine.
As did many writers of his time, Collins published most of his novels as serials in magazines such as Dickens's All the Year Round, and was known as a master of the form, creating just the right degree of suspense to keep his audience reading from week to week.

Pharaoh (novel)

PharaohFaraonPharaoh'' (novel)
In Poland, Bolesław Prus wrote several serialized novels: The Outpost (1885–86), The Doll (1887–89), The New Woman (1890–93), and his sole historical novel, Pharaoh (the latter, exceptionally, written entire over a year's time in 1894–95 and serialized only after completion, in 1895–96).
Like Prus' previous novels, Pharaoh debuted (1895–96) in newspaper serialization—in the Warsaw Tygodnik Ilustrowany (Illustrated Weekly).

The Outpost (Prus novel)

The OutpostThe Outpost'' (Prus novel)
In Poland, Bolesław Prus wrote several serialized novels: The Outpost (1885–86), The Doll (1887–89), The New Woman (1890–93), and his sole historical novel, Pharaoh (the latter, exceptionally, written entire over a year's time in 1894–95 and serialized only after completion, in 1895–96).
Written in installments, The Outpost was serialized in the illustrated weekly, Wędrowiec (The Wanderer) between March 19, 1885, and May 20, 1886.

Tales of the City

Anna Madrigalbook series of the same namesame name
The first several books in the Tales of the City series by Armistead Maupin appeared from 1978 as regular installments in San Francisco newspapers.
The stories from Tales were originally serialized prior to their novelization, with the first four titles appearing as regular installments in the San Francisco Chronicle, while the fifth appeared in the San Francisco Examiner.

The New Woman

In Poland, Bolesław Prus wrote several serialized novels: The Outpost (1885–86), The Doll (1887–89), The New Woman (1890–93), and his sole historical novel, Pharaoh (the latter, exceptionally, written entire over a year's time in 1894–95 and serialized only after completion, in 1895–96).
It was composed, and appeared in newspaper serialization, in 1890-93, and dealt with societal questions involving feminism.

The Bonfire of the Vanities

Bonfire of the Vanitiesnovel of the same nameSherman McCoy
Starting in 1984, Tom Wolfe's The Bonfire of the Vanities, about contemporary New York City, ran in 27 parts in Rolling Stone, partially inspired by the model of Dickens.
The novel was originally conceived as a serial in the style of Charles Dickens' writings; it ran in 27 installments in Rolling Stone starting in 1984.

The Serial

The Serial: A Year in the Life of Marin County
Similar serial novels ran in other city newspapers, such as The Serial (1976; Marin County), Tangled Lives (Boston), Bagtime (Chicago), and Federal Triangle (Washington, D.C.).
Beginning in 1976, the book's chapters had been serialized in the Marin County alternative weekly newspaper Pacific Sun, as well as the San Francisco Chronicle.

Bizarre Happenings Eyewitnessed over Two Decades

Bizarre Happenings Eyewitnessed over Two Decades was serialized in Xin Xiaoshuo (T: 新小說, S: 新小说, P: Xīn Xiǎoshuō; W: Hsin Hsiao-shuo; "New Fiction"), a magazine by Liang Qichao.
The novel was serialized in Xin Xiaoshuo (T: 新小說, S: 新小说, P: Xīn Xiǎoshuō; W: Hsin Hsiao-shuo; "New Fiction"), a magazine by Liang Qichao.

Gentlemen of the Road

Michael Chabon serialized Gentlemen of the Road in The New York Times Magazine in 2007.
Gentlemen of the Road is a 2007 serial novel by American author Michael Chabon.

Shanghai Shijie Fanhua Bao

The first half of Officialdom Unmasked appeared in installments of Shanghai Shijie Fanhua Bao, serialized there from April 1903 to June 1905.

Michael Chabon

Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & ClayChabon, Michael
Michael Chabon serialized Gentlemen of the Road in The New York Times Magazine in 2007.
Since the late 1990s, Chabon has written in an increasingly diverse series of styles for varied outlets; he is a notable defender of the merits of genre fiction and plot-driven fiction, and, along with novels, he has published screenplays, children's books, comics, and newspaper serials.

Bolesław Prus

Boleslaw PrusPrus, Bolesław
In Poland, Bolesław Prus wrote several serialized novels: The Outpost (1885–86), The Doll (1887–89), The New Woman (1890–93), and his sole historical novel, Pharaoh (the latter, exceptionally, written entire over a year's time in 1894–95 and serialized only after completion, in 1895–96).
Prus' novels, like his stories, were originally published in newspaper serialization.

The Plant (novel)

The PlantThe Plant'' (novel)
Stephen King experimented with The Plant (2000), and Michel Faber allowed The Guardian to serialise his novel The Crimson Petal and the White.
The Plant is an unfinished serial novel by American writer Stephen King, published in 1982–1985 privately and in 2000 as a commercial e-book.

Officialdom Unmasked

The first half of Officialdom Unmasked appeared in installments of Shanghai Shijie Fanhua Bao, serialized there from April 1903 to June 1905.
The first half of the work appeared in installments of Shanghai Shijie Fanhua Bao, serialized there from April 1903 to June 1905.