Serjeanty

grand serjeantygrand sergeantyin grossserjeantsserjeantiesserjeanty tenureserviceitinerant law-enforcement officersroyal serjeantysergeant
Under feudalism in England during the medieval era, tenure by serjeanty was a form of tenure in return for some specified non-standard service, thus distinguishing it from knight-service.wikipedia
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Sergeant

Detective SergeantSenior SergeantSgt
"Sergeant" is derived from the same source, though developing an entirely different meaning.
The etymology of the term is from Anglo-French sergant, serjant "servant, valet, court official, soldier", from Middle Latin servientem "servant, vassal, soldier".

Socage

soccagesocmanFree socage
It ranged from non-standard service in the king's army (distinguished only by equipment from that of the knight), to petty renders (for example the rendering of a quantity of basic food such as a goose) scarcely distinguishable from those of the rent-paying tenant or socager.
It contrasted with other forms of tenure including serjeanty (the farmer paid no rent but had to perform some personal/official service on behalf of his lord, including in times of war) and frankalmoin (some form of religious service).

Feudalism in England

feudalfeudal systemfeudal era
Under feudalism in England during the medieval era, tenure by serjeanty was a form of tenure in return for some specified non-standard service, thus distinguishing it from knight-service.

Queen's Champion

King's ChampionChampionKing or Queen's Champion
The most conspicuous are those of Queen's Champion, appurtenant to the manor of Scrivelsby, long held by the Dymoke family, and of supporting the king's right arm, appurtenant to the manor of Worksop.
The feudal holder of the Manor of Scrivelsby in Lincolnshire, England, has, since the Norman Conquest in 1066, held the manor from the Crown by grand serjeanty of being The Honourable The King's/Queen's Champion.

Arrentation

arrent
The legal doctrine which developed that serjeanties were inalienable (i.e. non-transferrable) and impartible, led during the reign of King Henry III (1216–1272) to the arrentation of those serjeanties the lands of which had been partly alienated, which were thereby converted into socage tenures (i.e. paying money rents), or in some cases, tenures by knight-service.
By extension it came to mean the conversion of serjeanty tenures into tenures by socage or Knight-service, which were easily made to yield a rental income to the Crown.

Chief Butler of England

Chief ButlerChief ButlersRoyal Chief Butler
The Chief Butler of England is an office of Grand Sergeanty associated with the feudal Manor of Kenninghall in Norfolk.

Manor of Worksop

Lord of the Manor of Worksop
Held in Grand Serjeanty by a lord of the manor, it was originally connected with nearby Worksop Manor, a stately home.

Manor of Scrivelsby

Scrivelsby
The most conspicuous are those of Queen's Champion, appurtenant to the manor of Scrivelsby, long held by the Dymoke family, and of supporting the king's right arm, appurtenant to the manor of Worksop.
The manor is held by grand serjeanty, a form of tenure which requires the performance of a service rather than a money payment – in this case as the King or Queen's Champion.

Kingston Russell

Kingston Russell HouseManor of Kingston Russell
The manor was held in-chief from the King by Grand Serjeanty, the particular service performed for the King was originally as Marshal of the Buttery, as the entry in the Book of Fees dated 1211 records for the Hundred of "Alvredesberge" (since dissolved), Dorset:

Farnham Royal

Manor of Farnham
The affix or suffix 'Royal' was given to the village in the late 11th century by the king, who gave the lord of the manor of Farnham, Bertram de Verdun, the Grand Serjeanty on the condition of providing a glove and putting it on the king's right hand at the coronation, and supporting his right arm, while the Royal sceptre was in his hand (see also Manor of Worksop).

Lord Great Chamberlain

Lord Great Chamberlain of Englandmaster chamberlainAmiredjibi
The position is a hereditary one, held since 1780 in gross.

Royal forest

forest lawroyal hunting forestforest
Another group, called serjeants-in-fee, and later, foresters-in-fee (not to be confused with the above), held small estates in return for their service in patrolling the forest and apprehending offenders.

Book of Fees

Testa de NevillLiber FeodorumTesta de Nevil
The Aid was assessed on fees held by feudal tenures of either knight service or serjeanty.

History of English land law

Free tenure was either military tenure, called also tenure in chivalry, or socage (including burgage and petit serjeanty), or frankalmoin, by which ecclesiastical corporations generally held their land.

Quia Emptores

1290concept of land as a commodity to be bought and soldStatute of Quia Emptores
The issue of alienation of serjeanty had been settled long before Quia Emptores.

Red Book of the Exchequer

R.B.
Among them are texts of the 1166 Cartae Baronum, a survey of feudal tenure; the Leges Henrici Primi, an early compilation of legal information dating from the reign of Henry I; the Constitutio domus regis, a handbook on the running of the royal household of about 1136; the Dialogus de Scaccario, a late 12th-century treatise on the practice of the Exchequer; the Book of Fees of c.1302; a 14th-century treatise on the Royal Mint; 12th-century pipe rolls; deeds and grants of William I and Henry I; a text of Magna Carta; records of serjeanties; and forms of oaths of Exchequer officers and of the king's councillors.

Grand Carver of England

royal carver
The Grand Carver of England is an hereditary office in the Royal Household of the sovereign of England, then Great Britain, and later the United Kingdom, held in gross.

Feudal land tenure in England

heldfeudal land tenurefeudal tenure
Under feudalism in England during the medieval era, tenure by serjeanty was a form of tenure in return for some specified non-standard service, thus distinguishing it from knight-service.

England in the Middle Ages

medievalmedieval EnglandMiddle Ages
Under feudalism in England during the medieval era, tenure by serjeanty was a form of tenure in return for some specified non-standard service, thus distinguishing it from knight-service.

Knight-service

knight serviceknight's servicecommon knights
Under feudalism in England during the medieval era, tenure by serjeanty was a form of tenure in return for some specified non-standard service, thus distinguishing it from knight-service.

Continental Europe

mainland EuropeContinentalthe Continent
It is also used of similar forms in Continental Europe.

Participle

past participlepresent participleparticiples
The word comes from the French noun sergent, itself from the Latin serviens, servientis, "serving", the present participle of the verb servo, "to keep, preserve, save, rescue, deliver".

Estate in land

estateestates in landestates
Serjeanty originated in the assignation of an estate in land on condition of the performance of a certain duty other than knight-service, usually the discharge of duties in the household of the king or a noble.

Sir Frederick Pollock, 3rd Baronet

Frederick PollockSir Frederick PollockPollock
The legal historians Pollock and Maitland (1895) described it as being a free "servantship" in the sense that the serjeant, whatever his task, was essentially a menial servant.

Frederic William Maitland

F. W. MaitlandMaitlandFW Maitland
The legal historians Pollock and Maitland (1895) described it as being a free "servantship" in the sense that the serjeant, whatever his task, was essentially a menial servant.