Service à la russe

à la russemulti-course dinnersserved ''à la russeservice ''à la russe
Service à la russe (French, "service in the Russian style") is a manner of dining that involves courses being brought to the table sequentially.wikipedia
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Service à la française

French fine diningservice ''à la françaiseà la française
It contrasts with service à la française ("service in the French style") in which all the food is brought out at once, in an impressive display.
That contrasts to service à la russe ("service in the Russian style") in which dishes are brought sequentially and served individually.

European cuisine

EuropeanWesternContinental
It later caught on in England and is now the style in which most modern Western restaurants serve food (with some significant modifications).
European presentation evolved from service à la française, or bringing multiple dishes to the table at once, into service à la russe, where dishes are presented sequentially.

Charger (table setting)

chargerservice platecharger plates
The place setting (called a cover) for each guest includes a service plate, all the necessary cutlery except those required for dessert, and stemmed glasses for water, wines and champagne.
In service à la russe charger plates are called service plates and are kept on the table during the entire meal until dessert is served.

Alexander Kurakin

Alexander BorisovichAlexander Borisovich KurakinKurakin
Russian Ambassador Alexander Kurakin is credited with bringing service à la russe to France in the early 19th century.
He is also credited with introducing Russian-style service à la russe to France, where it replaced the previous service à la française.

Finger bowl

finger bowls
The dessert plate is then brought out with a doily on top of it, a finger bowl on top of that, and a fork and spoon, the former balanced on the left side of the plate and the latter on the right.
A finger bowl is a bowl of water used for rinsing one's fingers after the last course of a formal meal served à la russe.

Doily

doiliesD'oyleys
The dessert plate is then brought out with a doily on top of it, a finger bowl on top of that, and a fork and spoon, the former balanced on the left side of the plate and the latter on the right.
Doilies figure prominently in the custom of finger bowls, once common in formal, multi-course dinners.

Full course dinner

during the wine coursecoursesformal
Full course dinner
In service à la russe, courses are brought to the table in sequence.

French language

FrenchfrancophoneFrench-language
Service à la russe (French, "service in the Russian style") is a manner of dining that involves courses being brought to the table sequentially.

France

🇫🇷FrenchFRA
Russian Ambassador Alexander Kurakin is credited with bringing service à la russe to France in the early 19th century.

England

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿EnglishENG
It later caught on in England and is now the style in which most modern Western restaurants serve food (with some significant modifications).

Restaurant

restaurantsrestaurateureateries
It later caught on in England and is now the style in which most modern Western restaurants serve food (with some significant modifications).

Cutlery

cutlermetalwareflatware
The place setting (called a cover) for each guest includes a service plate, all the necessary cutlery except those required for dessert, and stemmed glasses for water, wines and champagne.

Wine

winesfine winewhite wine
The place setting (called a cover) for each guest includes a service plate, all the necessary cutlery except those required for dessert, and stemmed glasses for water, wines and champagne.

Champagne

blanc de blancsblanc de noirschampagne wine
The place setting (called a cover) for each guest includes a service plate, all the necessary cutlery except those required for dessert, and stemmed glasses for water, wines and champagne.

Place card

Atop the service plate is a rolled napkin, and atop that is the place card.

Salt cellar

saltcellarsaltsalt cellars
Above the plate is a saltcellar, nut dish, and a menu.

Menu

menussecret menubill of fare
Above the plate is a saltcellar, nut dish, and a menu.

Soup spoon

Chinese soup spoon
The cutlery to the right of the service plate is, from the outside in, the oyster fork resting in the bowl of the soup spoon, the fish knife, the meat knife and the salad knife (or fruit knife).

Knife

knivesfish knifeanio
The cutlery to the right of the service plate is, from the outside in, the oyster fork resting in the bowl of the soup spoon, the fish knife, the meat knife and the salad knife (or fruit knife).

Fork

dinner forkforkssalad fork
On the left, from the outside in, are the fish fork, the meat fork and a salad fork (or fruit fork).

Platter (dishware)

platterplatters
The fish and meat courses are always served from platters because in correct service a filled plate is never placed before a guest, as this would indirectly dictate how much food the guest is to eat.

Jean-Louis Flandrin

In that style of service, all sorts of dishes were arranged on the table and guests served themselves and each other; but as Jean-Louis Flandrin has shown, the order of consumption—known to the guests of the time but rarely evident from contemporary menus or descriptions of meals—was essentially the same as the order of presentation in service à la russe.

Sarah Tyson Rorer

The most elaborate version of service à la russe, which reached its pinnacle in the last decades of the Victorian era, was described by Sarah Tyson Rorer in 1886.

Delmonico's

Charlie DelmonicoDelmonicoDelmonico's Building
At the time Rorer was writing, Alessandro Filippini, a chef at Delmonico's restaurant on Pine Street in New York, wrote a book of menus for "every family of means in the habit of giving a few dinners to its friends during the year", with a brief discussion of table service and a guide to wines. A few years after Filippini wrote his book, Charles Ranhofer, another chef at Delmonico's restaurant (variously at the 14th Street, 26th Street, and 44th Street locations), in his cookbook The Epicurean, outlined in great detail the dishes necessary for dinners ranging from six to fourteen courses.

Charles Ranhofer

A few years after Filippini wrote his book, Charles Ranhofer, another chef at Delmonico's restaurant (variously at the 14th Street, 26th Street, and 44th Street locations), in his cookbook The Epicurean, outlined in great detail the dishes necessary for dinners ranging from six to fourteen courses.