Seven Days in May

Seven Days in May'' (1964)the movieThe Seven Days In May
Seven Days in May is a 1964 American political thriller film about a military-political cabal's planned takeover of the United States government in reaction to the president's negotiation of a disarmament treaty with the Soviet Union.wikipedia
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John Frankenheimer

Frankenheimer John FrankenheimerJohn Frankenheimer Productions
The picture was directed by John Frankenheimer; starring Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas, Fredric March, and Ava Gardner; with the screenplay written by Rod Serling based on the novel of the same name by Fletcher Knebel and Charles W. Bailey II, published in September 1962. Kirk Douglas and director John Frankenheimer were the moving forces behind the filming of Seven Days in May; the film was produced by Edward Lewis through Douglas's company Joel Productions and Seven Arts Productions.
Among his credits were Birdman of Alcatraz (1962), The Manchurian Candidate (1962), Seven Days in May (1964), The Train (1965), Seconds (1966), Grand Prix (1966), French Connection II (1975), Black Sunday (1977), and Ronin (1998).

Kirk Douglas

KirkKirk Douglas Award for Excellence in FilmKirk Douglas Way
The picture was directed by John Frankenheimer; starring Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas, Fredric March, and Ava Gardner; with the screenplay written by Rod Serling based on the novel of the same name by Fletcher Knebel and Charles W. Bailey II, published in September 1962. Kirk Douglas and director John Frankenheimer were the moving forces behind the filming of Seven Days in May; the film was produced by Edward Lewis through Douglas's company Joel Productions and Seven Arts Productions.
He produced and starred in Lonely Are the Brave (1962), considered a classic, and Seven Days in May (1964), opposite Burt Lancaster, with whom he made seven films.

Ava Gardner

AvaGardner
The picture was directed by John Frankenheimer; starring Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas, Fredric March, and Ava Gardner; with the screenplay written by Rod Serling based on the novel of the same name by Fletcher Knebel and Charles W. Bailey II, published in September 1962.
Gardner appeared in several high-profile films from the 1940s to 1970s, including The Hucksters (1947), Show Boat (1951), Pandora and the Flying Dutchman (1951), The Snows of Kilimanjaro (1952), The Barefoot Contessa (1954), Bhowani Junction (1956), On the Beach (1959), 55 Days at Peking (1963), Seven Days in May (1964), The Night of the Iguana (1964), The Bible: In the Beginning... (1966), The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean (1972), Earthquake (1974), and The Cassandra Crossing (1976).

Fredric March

Frederic MarchVictory
The picture was directed by John Frankenheimer; starring Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas, Fredric March, and Ava Gardner; with the screenplay written by Rod Serling based on the novel of the same name by Fletcher Knebel and Charles W. Bailey II, published in September 1962.
In the 1960s, March's film career proceeded with a performance as President Jordan Lyman in the political thriller Seven Days in May (1964) in which he co-starred with Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas, and Edmond O'Brien; the part earned March a Golden Globe nomination as Best Actor.

Burt Lancaster

Hecht-Lancaster
The picture was directed by John Frankenheimer; starring Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas, Fredric March, and Ava Gardner; with the screenplay written by Rod Serling based on the novel of the same name by Fletcher Knebel and Charles W. Bailey II, published in September 1962.
He had a small role in The List of Adrian Messenger (1963) for producer/star Kirk Douglas, and then did two for Frankenheimer: Seven Days in May (1964), a political thriller with Douglas, and The Train (1964), a World War Two action film (Lancaster had Frankenheimer replace Arthur Penn several days into filming).

Edmond O'Brien

Edmund O'Brien
Edmond O'Brien as US Senator Ray Clark
He received the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor and the corresponding Golden Globe for his supporting role in The Barefoot Contessa (1954), as well as a second Golden Globe and another Academy Award nomination for Seven Days in May (1964).

Fletcher Knebel

Vanished
The picture was directed by John Frankenheimer; starring Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas, Fredric March, and Ava Gardner; with the screenplay written by Rod Serling based on the novel of the same name by Fletcher Knebel and Charles W. Bailey II, published in September 1962.
The book was a great success, reaching number one on the New York Times bestseller list, and was made into a successful movie also named Seven Days in May during 1964.

Martin Balsam

Martin Balsam as Paul Girard, aide to the president
Balsam appeared in such films as On the Waterfront, 12 Angry Men (as Juror #1), Time Limit, Breakfast at Tiffany's, The Carpetbaggers, Seven Days in May, The Anderson Tapes, Hombre, Catch-22, Tora! Tora! Tora! (as Admiral Husband E. Kimmel), Little Big Man, The Taking of Pelham One Two Three, All the President's Men, Murder on the Orient Express, The Delta Force, and The Goodbye People.

Richard Anderson

Richard Anderson as Colonel Ben Murdock, also a conspirator
He was the object of the unrequited love of Clara Varner (Joanne Woodward) in The Long, Hot Summer (1958) and a suspicious military officer in Seven Days in May (1964).

George Macready

George Macready as Chris Todd, member of the president's cabinet
He had worked with Douglas previously in Detective Story (1951) and later he appeared with Douglas again in two more films: Vincente Minnelli's Two Weeks in Another Town (1962) and John Frankenheimer's Seven Days in May (1964).

Rod Serling

Rod Serling’sDoes the Name Grimsby Do Anything to You?Rod Sterling
The picture was directed by John Frankenheimer; starring Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas, Fredric March, and Ava Gardner; with the screenplay written by Rod Serling based on the novel of the same name by Fletcher Knebel and Charles W. Bailey II, published in September 1962.
He used this time to teach as well as work on a new screenplay, Seven Days in May.

Hugh Marlowe

Hugh Marlowe as Harold McPherson, TV commentator who is one of the conspirators
His later films include Earth vs. the Flying Saucers (1956), Elmer Gantry (1960), Birdman of Alcatraz (1962), and Seven Days in May (1964).

Tyler McVey

Tyler McVey (General Hardesty, another conspirator: "Barney Rutkowski, Air Defense. He's screaming bloody murder about those twelve troop carriers dispatched to El Paso.")
In 1964, McVey was cast as General Hardesty in the political thriller film Seven Days in May.

Seven Days in May (novel)

Seven Days in Maynovel of the same name
The picture was directed by John Frankenheimer; starring Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas, Fredric March, and Ava Gardner; with the screenplay written by Rod Serling based on the novel of the same name by Fletcher Knebel and Charles W. Bailey II, published in September 1962.
It was made into a successful movie, also named Seven Days in May, in 1964.

Edwin Walker

Edwin A. WalkerGen. Edwin Walker
In November 1961, President John F. Kennedy accepted the resignation of vociferously anti-Communist General Edwin Walker who was indoctrinating the troops under his command with personal political opinions and had described former President Harry S. Truman, former United States Secretary of State Dean Acheson, former First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and other recent still-active public figures as Communist sympathizers.
Together with Air Force General Curtis LeMay, Walker was said to have inspired the character of the Air Force General James Mattoon Scott (played by Burt Lancaster) for the movie Seven Days in May; Walker is also referred to in the movie.

Jack Mullaney

Jack Mullaney ("All properly decoded in four point oh fashion and respectfully submitted by yours truly, Lieutenant junior grade, Dorsey Grayson.")
He appeared as murderer Bert Rockwood on episode #227 of Lee Marvin's M Squad, titled "The Vanishing Lady," which first aired April 3, 1959, and also had a small, but important, role in the 1964 political thriller Seven Days in May.

Fredd Wayne

Fredd Wayne (Henry Whitney, official from the American embassy in Spain: "You find any effects of the Americans? Anything at all?")

Andrew Duggan

Andrew Duggan as Colonel "Mutt" Henderson, friend of Jiggs Casey
He had roles in the 1964 film, Seven Days in May, and played the U.S. President and an imposter in the 1967 film, In Like Flint.

Seven Arts Productions

Seven ArtsSeven Arts AssociatesSeven Arts Pictures
Kirk Douglas and director John Frankenheimer were the moving forces behind the filming of Seven Days in May; the film was produced by Edward Lewis through Douglas's company Joel Productions and Seven Arts Productions.
It also retained ancillary rights on new productions surrendered on earlier films, including Seven Days in May (1964) and Promise Her Anything (1965) for release by Paramount.

Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor

Best Supporting ActorBest Actor in a Supporting RoleAcademy Award
At the 35th Academy Awards on April 8, 1963, while Seven Days in May was still in its pre-production and casting stages, What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?'s Victor Buono was one of the four unsuccessful nominees vying for Best Supporting Actor. His name appears on a list of actors engaged for the production, but there is no confirmation of his actual participation in the filming.

Ferris Webster

Ferris Webster [editor of Seven Days in May] (General Barney Rutkowski: "There's some kind of a secret base out there, Mr. President, and I think I should have been notified of it.")
Webster edited the three films of director John Frankenheimer's "paranoia trilogy": The Manchurian Candidate (1962), Seven Days in May (1964), and Seconds (1966).

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63)

USS ''Kitty HawkKitty HawkUSS ''Kitty Hawk'' (CV-63)
In an early example of guerrilla filmmaking, Frankenheimer photographed Martin Balsam being ferried out to the supercarrier USS Kitty Hawk, berthed at Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego (standing in for Gibraltar), without prior Defense Department permission.
Film director John Frankenheimer filmed shots for the movie Seven Days in May on board the vessel in 1963.

John Larkin (actor, born 1912)

John Larkin
John Larkin (Colonel John Broderick, one of the conspirators: "Well, well, well, if it isn't my favorite jarhead himself, Jiggs Casey.")
February 12 saw the release of the Rod Serling-scripted film, Seven Days in May, directed by John Frankenheimer.

John Houseman

Houseman, JohnJohn Houseman ProductionsJohn Houseman Studio Theater
John Houseman (Vice Admiral Farley C. Barnswell, declined conspirator: "I'm sorry, sir. I can only recount to you the situation as it occurred. I signed no paper. He took nothing with him.")
Houseman had acted occasionally during the early part of his career and he had briefly appeared in Seven Days in May (1964).