Seven Years' War

Seven Years’ WarSeven Years WarThe Seven Years' WarThird Silesian or Seven Years' WarFrench and Indian WarSeven Year WarAnglo-French WarsEuropean theater of the Seven Years' WarThe Seven Years Warwar
The Seven Years' War was a global war fought between 1756 and 1763.wikipedia
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Kingdom of Prussia

PrussiaPrussianPrussian court
The conflict split Europe into two coalitions: one was led by the Kingdom of Great Britain and included the Kingdom of Prussia, the Kingdom of Portugal, the Electorate of Brunswick-Lüneburg (also named Hanover), and a few other small German states; while the other was led by the Kingdom of France and included the Austrian-led Holy Roman Empire, including the Electorate of Saxony and most of the smaller German states, the Russian Empire (until 1762), the Kingdom of Spain, and Sweden.
Frederick the Great was instrumental in starting the Seven Years' War, holding his own against Austria, Russia, France and Sweden and establishing Prussia's role in the German states, as well as establishing the country as a European great power.

French and Indian War

French & Indian WarFrench and IndianSeven Years' War
Although Anglo-French skirmishes over their American colonies had begun with what became the French and Indian War in 1754, the large-scale conflict that drew in most of the European powers was centered on Austria's desire to recover Silesia from Prussia.
The European nations declared a wider war upon one another overseas in 1756, two years into the French and Indian war, and some view the French and Indian War as being merely the American theater of the worldwide Seven Years' War of 1756–63; however, the French and Indian War is viewed in the United States as a singular conflict which was not associated with any European war.

Kingdom of Great Britain

Great BritainBritishBritain
The conflict split Europe into two coalitions: one was led by the Kingdom of Great Britain and included the Kingdom of Prussia, the Kingdom of Portugal, the Electorate of Brunswick-Lüneburg (also named Hanover), and a few other small German states; while the other was led by the Kingdom of France and included the Austrian-led Holy Roman Empire, including the Electorate of Saxony and most of the smaller German states, the Russian Empire (until 1762), the Kingdom of Spain, and Sweden.
In 1763, victory in the Seven Years' War led to the dominance of the British Empire, which was to become the foremost global power for over a century and slowly grew to become the largest empire in history.

War of the Austrian Succession

War of Austrian SuccessionAustrian War of SuccessionAustrian Succession
Because of Austria's alliance with France to recapture Silesia, which had been lost in the War of the Austrian Succession, Prussia formed an alliance with Britain.
However, the underlying issues were not resolved; combined with the political upheaval in Europe, this resulted in the 1756-1763 Seven Years' War.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
Hostilities were heightened when a British unit led by a 22-year-old Lt. Colonel George Washington ambushed a small French force at the Battle of Jumonville Glen on 28 May 1754.
This incident ignited the French and Indian War, which later became part of the larger Seven Years' War.

Treaty of Paris (1763)

Treaty of Paris1763 Treaty of ParisTreaty of Paris of 1763
The war ended with the Treaty of Paris between France, Spain and Great Britain and the Treaty of Hubertusburg between Saxony, Austria and Prussia, in 1763.
The Treaty of Paris, also known as the Treaty of 1763, was signed on 10 February 1763 by the kingdoms of Great Britain, France and Spain, with Portugal in agreement, after Great Britain's victory over France and Spain during the Seven Years' War.

Russian Empire

RussiaImperial RussiaRussian
The conflict split Europe into two coalitions: one was led by the Kingdom of Great Britain and included the Kingdom of Prussia, the Kingdom of Portugal, the Electorate of Brunswick-Lüneburg (also named Hanover), and a few other small German states; while the other was led by the Kingdom of France and included the Austrian-led Holy Roman Empire, including the Electorate of Saxony and most of the smaller German states, the Russian Empire (until 1762), the Kingdom of Spain, and Sweden.
Her reign, which lasted nearly 20 years, is also known for her involvement in the Seven Years' War.

French Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionary FranceRevolutionary
The war restructured not only the European political order, but also affected events all around the world, paving the way for the beginning of later British world supremacy in the 19th century, the rise of Prussia in Germany (eventually replacing Austria as the leading German State), the beginning of tensions in British North America, as well as a clear sign of France's eventual turmoil.
Following the Seven Years' War and the American Revolutionary War, the French government was deeply in debt.

Pomeranian War

Pomeranian CampaignPomeranian TheaterPomeranian theatre
Swedish historiography uses the name Pommerska kriget (Pomeranian War), as the Sweden–Prussian conflict in 1757–1762 was limited to Pomerania in northern central Germany.
The Pomeranian War was a theatre of the Seven Years' War.

New France

FrenchCanadaNouvelle-France
The war was successful for Great Britain, which gained the bulk of New France in North America, Spanish Florida, some individual Caribbean islands in the West Indies, the colony of Senegal on the West African coast, and superiority over the French trading outposts on the Indian subcontinent.
In 1763, France ceded the rest of New France to Great Britain and Spain, except the islands of Saint Pierre and Miquelon, at the Treaty of Paris which ended the Seven Years' War, part of which included the French and Indian War in America.

Siege of Pirna

besieged at Pirnacapitulated at Pirnainvasion of Saxony in 1756
Realizing that war was imminent, Prussia pre-emptively struck Saxony and quickly overran it.
The Siege of Pirna (or Investment of Pirna) took place in 1756 as part of the Prussian invasion of Saxony during the Third Silesian War (part of the Seven Years' War).

Third Silesian War

The Third Silesian War involved Prussia and Austria (1756–1763).
The war was fought mainly in Silesia, Bohemia and Upper Saxony and formed one theatre of the Seven Years' War.

Battle of Chinsurah

BadaraBattle of ChinsuraChinsura
The Dutch Republic, a long-time British ally, kept its neutrality intact, fearing the odds against Britain and Prussia fighting the great powers of Europe, and even tried to prevent Britain's domination in India.
The Battle of Chinsurah (also known as the Battle of Biderra or Battle of Hoogly ) took place near Chinsurah, India on 25 November 1759 during the Seven Years' War between a force of British troops mainly of the British East India Company and a force of the Dutch East India Company which had been invited by the Nawab of Bengal Mir Jafar to help him eject the British and establish themselves as the leading commercial company in Bengal.

Treaty of Hubertusburg

Peace of HubertusburgPeace of HubertsburgTreaty of Hubertusburg (1763)
The war ended with the Treaty of Paris between France, Spain and Great Britain and the Treaty of Hubertusburg between Saxony, Austria and Prussia, in 1763.
Together with the Treaty of Paris, signed five days earlier, it marked the end of the Seven Years' War.

Expulsion of the Acadians

Great UpheavalGreat ExpulsionAcadian Expulsion
The first British action was the assault on Acadia on 16 June 1755 in the Battle of Fort Beauséjour, which was immediately followed by their expulsion of the Acadians.
The Expulsion (1755–1764) occurred during the French and Indian War (the North American theatre of the Seven Years' War) and was part of the British military campaign against New France.

Frederick the Great

Frederick II of PrussiaFrederick IIFriedrich II of Prussia
In Europe, the war began disastrously for Prussia, but with a combination of good luck and successful strategy, King Frederick the Great managed to retrieve the Prussian position and retain the status quo ante bellum.
His most significant accomplishments during his reign included his military victories, his reorganization of Prussian armies, his patronage of the arts and the Enlightenment and his final success against great odds in the Seven Years' War.

Edward Braddock

General BraddockGeneral Edward BraddockBraddock
In July British Major General Edward Braddock led about 2,000 army troops and provincial militia on an expedition to retake Fort Duquesne, but the expedition ended in disastrous defeat.
Major General Edward Braddock (January 1695 – 13 July 1755) was a British officer and commander-in-chief for the Thirteen Colonies during the actions at the start of the French and Indian War (1754–1763), which is also known in Europe and Canada as the Seven Years' War (1756–1763).

Battle of Fort Beauséjour

Battle of BeausejourBattle of Fort Beausejourcaptured Fort Beauséjour
The first British action was the assault on Acadia on 16 June 1755 in the Battle of Fort Beauséjour, which was immediately followed by their expulsion of the Acadians.
the opening of a British offensive in the Acadia/ Nova Scotia theatre of the Seven Years' War, which would eventually lead to the end of the French Empire in North America.

History of Cuba

CubaCuban history1906 Cuban Insurrection
Spain lost Florida but gained French Louisiana and regained control of its colonies, e.g., Cuba and the Philippines, which had been captured by the British during the war.
One important turning point came in the Seven Years' War, when the British conquered the port of Havana and introduced thousands of slaves in a ten-month period.

Battle of Fort Necessity

Battle of the Great MeadowsFort NecessityGreat Meadows
The French retaliated by attacking Washington's army at Fort Necessity on 3 July 1754 and forced Washington to surrender.
The Battle of Fort Necessity began the French and Indian War, which later spiraled into the global conflict known as the Seven Years' War.

Battle of Jumonville Glen

Jumonville Glenambushed a French scouting partyJumonville affair
Hostilities were heightened when a British unit led by a 22-year-old Lt. Colonel George Washington ambushed a small French force at the Battle of Jumonville Glen on 28 May 1754.
Since Britain and France were not then at war, the event had international repercussions, and was a contributing factor in the start of the Seven Years' War in 1756.

Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh, PennsylvaniaPittsburgh, PACity of Pittsburgh
The most important French fort planned was intended to occupy a position at "the Forks" where the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers meet to form the Ohio River (present day Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania).
The French and Indian War, the North American front of the Seven Years' War, began with the future Pittsburgh as its center.

Fort Duquesne

DuquesneFort Du QuesneFort Duquense
Peaceful British attempts to halt this fort construction were unsuccessful, and the French proceeded to build the fort they named Fort Duquesne.
Fort Duquesne was destroyed by the French, prior to English conquest during the Seven Years' War, known as the French and Indian War on the North American front.

American Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionary WarRevolutionary
The war restructured not only the European political order, but also affected events all around the world, paving the way for the beginning of later British world supremacy in the 19th century, the rise of Prussia in Germany (eventually replacing Austria as the leading German State), the beginning of tensions in British North America, as well as a clear sign of France's eventual turmoil.
Some writers begin their histories of the American Revolution with the British coalition victory in the Seven Years' War in 1763, viewing the French and Indian War as though it were the American theater of the Seven Years' War.

Elizabeth of Russia

Empress ElizabethElizabethElizabeth Petrovna
The taxation needed for war caused the Russian people considerable hardship, being added to the taxation of salt and alcohol begun by Empress Elizabeth in 1759 to complete her addition to the Winter Palace.
She led the country during the two major European conflicts of her time: the War of Austrian Succession (1740–48) and the Seven Years' War (1756–63).