Seventh United States Army

Seventh ArmyU.S. Seventh Army7th ArmyUnited States Seventh ArmyUS 7th ArmyAmerican Seventh ArmyU.S. 7th ArmyUS Seventh ArmySeventh U.S. ArmySeventh
The Seventh Army was a United States army created during World War II that evolved into the United States Army Europe (USAREUR) during the 1950s and 1960s.wikipedia
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George S. Patton

George PattonGeneral PattonPatton
Originally the I Armored Corps under command of Lieutenant General George S. Patton, it made landfall at Morocco during Operation Torch as the Western Task Force, the first all-U.S. force to enter the European war.
George Smith Patton Jr. (November 11, 1885 – December 21, 1945) was a General of the United States Army who commanded the U.S. Seventh Army in the Mediterranean theater of World War II, and the U.S. Third Army in France and Germany following D-Day, the Allied invasion of Normandy in June 1944.

United States Army Europe

U.S. Army EuropeUSAREUR7th Army
The Seventh Army was a United States army created during World War II that evolved into the United States Army Europe (USAREUR) during the 1950s and 1960s.
Seventh United States Army was the first U.S. Field Army to see combat during the Second World War and was activated at sea when the I Armored Corps under the command of Lt. General George Patton was redesignated on 10 July 1943.

Operation Undertone

Germans by 19 Marchassault on the Westwallobjective of occupying
In a lead role in Operation Undertone launched March 15, the Seventh Army fought its way across the Rhine into Germany, capturing Nuremberg and then Munich.
Operation Undertone was a large assault by the U.S. Seventh and French 1st Armies of the U.S. Sixth Army Group as part of the Allied invasion of Germany in March 1945 during World War II.

Sixth United States Army Group

6th Army GroupSixth Army GroupU.S. Sixth Army Group
It then drove a retreating German army north and then west toward the Alsace, being absorbed into the newly created Sixth United States Army Group in mid-September. (Patch was promoted to lieutenant general three days later.) On September 15, the Seventh was put under the field control of the 6th Army Group, under Lieutenant General Jacob L. Devers.
In a lead role in Operation Undertone, its Seventh Army fought its way across the Rhine into Germany, captured Nuremberg and then Munich.

I Armored Corps (United States)

I Armored Corps1st Armored CorpsU.S. Armored Corps
Originally the I Armored Corps under command of Lieutenant General George S. Patton, it made landfall at Morocco during Operation Torch as the Western Task Force, the first all-U.S. force to enter the European war. After succeeding there, Patton, now promoted to the rank of lieutenant general, commanded the Seventh Army, which was formed at midnight on 10 July 1943 by the redesignation of the I Armored Corps, during the Allied invasion of Sicily in July 1943 in conjunction with the British Eighth Army, commanded by General Sir Bernard Montgomery, Patton's rival.
Following the successful defeat of the Axis powers under Generalfeldmarschall Erwin Rommel in North Africa, in May 1943, I Armored Corps was redesignated as the Seventh Army on 10 July 1943 while at sea en route to the Allied invasion of Sicily as the spearhead of Operation Husky.

Operation Nordwind

NordwindOperation NorthwindOperation ''Nordwind
In January 1945 it repelled a fierce but brief enemy counter-offensive during the German Operation Nordwind, then completed its reduction of the region by mid-March.
The goal of the offensive was to break through the lines of the U.S. Seventh Army and French 1st Army in the Upper Vosges mountains and the Alsatian Plain, and destroy them, as well as the seizure of Strasbourg, which Himmler had promised would be captured by 30 January.

Allied invasion of Sicily

Operation HuskySicilyinvasion of Sicily
After succeeding there, Patton, now promoted to the rank of lieutenant general, commanded the Seventh Army, which was formed at midnight on 10 July 1943 by the redesignation of the I Armored Corps, during the Allied invasion of Sicily in July 1943 in conjunction with the British Eighth Army, commanded by General Sir Bernard Montgomery, Patton's rival.
The Western Task Force (Task Force 343) was commanded by Lieutenant General George S. Patton and consisted of the American Seventh Army.

Alexander Patch

Alexander M. PatchPatchAlexander M. (Sandy) Patch
In March 1944, Major General Alexander Patch, a highly experienced and competent commander, was assigned to command the Seventh Army, which moved to Naples, Italy, the following July.
During World War II he commanded U.S. Army and U.S. Marine Corps forces during the Guadalcanal Campaign, and the U.S. Seventh Army on the Western Front.

1st Airborne Task Force (Allied)

1st Airborne Task ForceFirst Airborne Task Force1st Allied Airborne Task Force
Within one month, the Seventh Army, which by then employed three American divisions, five French divisions and the 1st Airborne Task Force, had advanced 400 miles and joined with the Allied forces coming south from Normandy.
Formed in July 1944, under the command of Major General Robert T. Frederick, it took part in the "Dragoon" landings on 15 August 1944, securing the area north-west of the landing beaches, before moving towards the French-Italian border as part of the United States Seventh Army.

Italian campaign (World War II)

Italian CampaignItalyItalian Front
The headquarters of the Seventh Army remained relatively inactive at Palermo, Sicily, and Algiers until January 1944, when Lieutenant General Mark W. Clark, then commanding the U.S. Fifth Army on the Italian Front, was assigned as commander and the Seventh Army began planning for the invasion of southern France.
The land forces involved were the U.S. Seventh Army, under Lieutenant General George S. Patton, and the British Eighth Army, under General Bernard Montgomery.

United States Army North

U.S. Fifth ArmyFifth ArmyFifth United States Army
The headquarters of the Seventh Army remained relatively inactive at Palermo, Sicily, and Algiers until January 1944, when Lieutenant General Mark W. Clark, then commanding the U.S. Fifth Army on the Italian Front, was assigned as commander and the Seventh Army began planning for the invasion of southern France.
In the end, VI Corps was withdrawn, forming the nucleus of the field forces of the U.S. Seventh Army for the invasion of the French Riviera, Operation Dragoon.

Bernard Montgomery

MontgomeryField Marshal MontgomerySir Bernard Montgomery
After succeeding there, Patton, now promoted to the rank of lieutenant general, commanded the Seventh Army, which was formed at midnight on 10 July 1943 by the redesignation of the I Armored Corps, during the Allied invasion of Sicily in July 1943 in conjunction with the British Eighth Army, commanded by General Sir Bernard Montgomery, Patton's rival.
He managed to have the plans recast to concentrate the Allied forces, having Lieutenant General George Patton's US Seventh Army land in the Gulf of Gela (on the Eighth Army's left flank, which landed around Syracuse in the south-east of Sicily) rather than near Palermo in the west and north of Sicily.

Harold Alexander, 1st Earl Alexander of Tunis

Harold AlexanderSir Harold AlexanderThe Viscount Alexander of Tunis
During the operation the Seventh and Eighth Armies came under the command of the 15th Army Group, under General Sir Harold Alexander.
The Axis forces in Tunisia surrendered by May 1943, and Alexander's command became the 15th Army Group, which was, under General Eisenhower, responsible for mounting in July the Allied invasion of Sicily, again seeing Alexander controlling two field armies: General Montgomery's Eighth Army and Lieutenant General George S. Patton's U.S. Seventh Army.

70th Infantry Division (United States)

70th Infantry Division70th274th Infantry Regiment
In less than nine months of continuous fighting, the Seventh Army had advanced over 1,000 miles and for varying times had commanded 24 U.S. and Allied divisions, including the 3rd, 36th, 42nd, 44th, 45th, 63rd, 70th, 100th, and 103rd Infantry Divisions.
The 70th Infantry Division ("Trailblazers" ) was a unit of the United States Army in World War II, spearheading the Seventh United States Army's drive into Germany, south of Saarbrücken.

103rd Infantry Division (United States)

103rd Infantry Division103rd Division103rd Infantry Divisions
In less than nine months of continuous fighting, the Seventh Army had advanced over 1,000 miles and for varying times had commanded 24 U.S. and Allied divisions, including the 3rd, 36th, 42nd, 44th, 45th, 63rd, 70th, 100th, and 103rd Infantry Divisions.
The 103rd Infantry Division ("Cactus Division" ) was a unit of the United States Army which served in the U.S. Seventh Army of the 6th Army Group during World War II.

Operation Dragoon

invasion of southern FranceSouthern FranceAllied invasion of southern France
The headquarters of the Seventh Army remained relatively inactive at Palermo, Sicily, and Algiers until January 1944, when Lieutenant General Mark W. Clark, then commanding the U.S. Fifth Army on the Italian Front, was assigned as commander and the Seventh Army began planning for the invasion of southern France. After the conquests of Palermo and Messina the Seventh Army prepared for the invasion of France by its Mediterranean coast as the lead element of Operation Dragoon in August 1944.

3rd Infantry Division (United States)

3rd Infantry Division3rd Division3d Infantry Division
In less than nine months of continuous fighting, the Seventh Army had advanced over 1,000 miles and for varying times had commanded 24 U.S. and Allied divisions, including the 3rd, 36th, 42nd, 44th, 45th, 63rd, 70th, 100th, and 103rd Infantry Divisions.
The division, serving under the command of Lieutenant General George S. Patton's U.S. Seventh Army, fought its way into Palermo before elements of the 2nd Armored Division could get there, in the process marching 90 miles in three days, and raced on to capture Messina on 17 August, thus ending the brief Sicilian campaign, where the division had a short rest to absorb replacements.

Jacob L. Devers

Jacob DeversDeversAllied invasion in the south of France
(Patch was promoted to lieutenant general three days later.) On September 15, the Seventh was put under the field control of the 6th Army Group, under Lieutenant General Jacob L. Devers.
American formations in the theater included Lieutenant General Mark W. Clark's Fifth Army and George Patton's Seventh Army; the Twelfth Air Force, led by Major General John K. Cannon; the Fifteenth Air Force, commanded by Major General Nathan Twining; and the NATOUSA Services of Supply headed by Lieutenant General Thomas B. Larkin.

Colmar Pocket

COLMARColmar 1945Battle of Colmar Pocket
Along with the French First Army, the Seventh went on the offensive in February 1945 and eliminated the Colmar Pocket.
Likewise, in the northern Vosges Mountains, the French 2nd Armored Division spearheaded a U.S. Seventh Army advance, forced the Saverne Gap, and drove to the Rhine, liberating Strasbourg on 23 November 1944.

Samuel Adler (composer)

Samuel AdlerSamuel Hans AdlerDr. Samuel Adler
For over a decade it also hosted and staffed the acclaimed Seventh Army Symphony Orchestra founded by the conductor Samuel Adler in support of the United States Army's cultural diplomacy initiatives throughout Germany and Europe in the aftermath of World War II (1952–1962).
In addition, he is credited with founding and conducting the U.S. Seventh Army's Seventh Army Symphony Orchestra which participated in the cultural diplomacy initiatives of the United States in Germany and throughout Europe in the aftermath of World War II.

36th Infantry Division (United States)

36th Infantry DivisionU.S. 36th Infantry Division36th Division
In less than nine months of continuous fighting, the Seventh Army had advanced over 1,000 miles and for varying times had commanded 24 U.S. and Allied divisions, including the 3rd, 36th, 42nd, 44th, 45th, 63rd, 70th, 100th, and 103rd Infantry Divisions.
The 36th Division was originally intended to take part in the Allied invasion of Sicily, codenamed Operation Husky, but Lieutenant General George S. Patton the Seventh Army commander, preferred to use experienced troops instead and the 36th Division remained in North Africa.

100th Infantry Division (United States)

100th Infantry Division100th DivisionU.S. 100th Infantry Division
In less than nine months of continuous fighting, the Seventh Army had advanced over 1,000 miles and for varying times had commanded 24 U.S. and Allied divisions, including the 3rd, 36th, 42nd, 44th, 45th, 63rd, 70th, 100th, and 103rd Infantry Divisions.
It was made part of VI Corps of the Seventh United States Army, Sixth United States Army Group.

VI Corps (United States)

VI CorpsU.S. VI CorpsUS VI Corps
By war's end it was part of the Seventh Army of the 6th Army Group.

Lucian Truscott

Lucian K. TruscottLucian K. Truscott, Jr.Lucian K. Truscott Jr.
Finally it crossed the Brenner Pass and made contact with Lieutenant General Lucian Truscott's U.S. Fifth Army at Vipiteno – once again on Italian soil.
He led the division in the assault on Sicily in July 1943, coming under the command of the Seventh U.S. Army, commanded by Patton, now a lieutenant general.

42nd Infantry Division (United States)

42nd Infantry Division42nd DivisionRainbow Division
In less than nine months of continuous fighting, the Seventh Army had advanced over 1,000 miles and for varying times had commanded 24 U.S. and Allied divisions, including the 3rd, 36th, 42nd, 44th, 45th, 63rd, 70th, 100th, and 103rd Infantry Divisions.