Sexual fetishism

fetishsexual fetishfetishesfetishismfetishisticsexual fetishesfetishistfetishistsfetishizefetishized
Sexual fetishism or erotic fetishism is a sexual fixation on a nonliving object or nongenital body part.wikipedia
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Partialism

Sexual arousal from a particular body part can be further classified as partialism. In the DSM-IV, sexual interest in body parts was distinguished from fetishism under the name partialism (diagnosed as Paraphilia NOS), but it was merged with fetishistic disorder for the DSM-5. In 1987, a revised edition of the DSM-III (DSM-III-R) introduced a new diagnosis for body part arousal, called partialism.
Partialism is sexual interest with an exclusive focus on a specific part of the body other than the genitals.

Paraphilia

sexual perversionparaphiliasparaphilic
Paraphilias such as urophilia, necrophilia and coprophilia have been described as fetishes.
Such attraction may be labeled sexual fetishism.

Sexual arousal

sexually arousedarousalaroused
Sexual arousal from a particular body part can be further classified as partialism.
When sexual arousal is achieved by or dependent on the use of objects, it is referred to as sexual fetishism, or in some instances a paraphilia.

BDSM

sadomasochisticsado-masochismsado-masochistic
This broader usage of fetish covers parts or features of the body (including obesity and body modifications), objects, situations and activities (such as smoking or BDSM).
They enter such situations solely with the intention to allow their partners to fulfill their own needs or fetishes.

Necrophilia

necrophilenecrophiliacnecrophilic
Paraphilias such as urophilia, necrophilia and coprophilia have been described as fetishes.
5) Fetishistic necrophiliacs: People who remove objects (e.g., panties or a tampon) or body parts (e.g., a finger or genitalia) from a corpse for sexual purposes, without engaging in intercourse.

Underwear fetishism

panty fetishismfetishismpanties
Of the groups about clothing, 33% belonged to groups about clothes worn on the legs or buttocks (such as stockings or skirts), 32% about footwear (shoe fetishism), 12% about underwear (underwear fetishism), and 9% about whole-body wear such as jackets.
Underwear fetishism is a sexual fetishism relating to undergarments, and refers to preoccupation with the sexual excitement of certain types of underwear, including panties, stockings, pantyhose, bras, or other items.

Cross-dressing

cross-dressercross-dresscrossdressing
Under the DSM-5, fetishism is sexual arousal from nonliving objects or specific nongenital body parts, excluding clothes used for cross-dressing (as that falls under transvestic disorder) and sex toys that are designed for genital stimulation.
A transvestic fetishist is a person who cross-dresses as part of a sexual fetish.

Imprinting (psychology)

imprintingimprintimprinted
Theories of sexual imprinting propose that humans learn to recognize sexually desirable features and activities during childhood.
Sexual imprinting on inanimate objects is a popular theory concerning the development of sexual fetishism.

Foot fetishism

foot fetishfeetfoot worship
Of the groups about body parts or features, 47% belonged to groups about feet (foot fetishism), 9% about body fluids, 9% about body size, 7% about hair (hair fetish), and 5% about muscles (muscle worship).
It is the most common form of sexual fetishism for otherwise non-sexual objects or body parts and is more prevalent in men than women.

Shoe fetishism

shoe fetishfetishretifism
Of the groups about clothing, 33% belonged to groups about clothes worn on the legs or buttocks (such as stockings or skirts), 32% about footwear (shoe fetishism), 12% about underwear (underwear fetishism), and 9% about whole-body wear such as jackets.
Sexual fetishism

Other specified paraphilic disorder

paraphilia, not otherwise specifiednot otherwise specifiedParaphilia Not Otherwise Specified
In the DSM-IV, sexual interest in body parts was distinguished from fetishism under the name partialism (diagnosed as Paraphilia NOS), but it was merged with fetishistic disorder for the DSM-5.
Partialism was considered a Paraphilia NOS in the DSM-IV, but was subsumed into fetishistic disorder by the DSM-5.

Boot fetishism

kinky bootsboot fetishboot fetishists
Possible boot fetishism has been reported in two different primates from the same zoo.
Boot fetishism is a sexual fetish focused on boots.

Alfred Binet

BinetBinet, Alfred
Fétichisme was first used in an erotic context by Alfred Binet in 1887.
He studied sexual behavior, coining the term erotic fetishism to describe individuals whose sexual interests in nonhuman objects, such as articles of clothing, and linking this to the after-effects of early impressions in an anticipation of Freud.

Richard von Krafft-Ebing

Krafft-EbingKrafft-EbbingKrafft-Ebing, Baron Richard Von
Richard von Krafft-Ebing and Havelock Ellis also believed that fetishism arose from associative experiences, but disagreed on what type of predisposition was necessary.
Sexual fetishism

Mental disorder

mental illnessnervous breakdownmentally ill
The object of interest is called the fetish; the person who has a fetish for that object is a fetishist. A sexual fetish may be regarded as a non-pathological aid to sexual excitement, or as a mental disorder if it causes significant psychosocial distress for the person or has detrimental effects on important areas of their life.

Smoking

smokersmokesmokers
This broader usage of fetish covers parts or features of the body (including obesity and body modifications), objects, situations and activities (such as smoking or BDSM).

Urolagnia

golden showerswatersportsurophilia
Paraphilias such as urophilia, necrophilia and coprophilia have been described as fetishes.

Coprophilia

scatcoprophilecoprophilic
Paraphilias such as urophilia, necrophilia and coprophilia have been described as fetishes.

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders

DSMDSM-IVDSM-IV-TR
In the DSM-IV, sexual interest in body parts was distinguished from fetishism under the name partialism (diagnosed as Paraphilia NOS), but it was merged with fetishistic disorder for the DSM-5. In 1987, a revised edition of the DSM-III (DSM-III-R) introduced a new diagnosis for body part arousal, called partialism.

Martin Kafka

Martin Kafka argued that partialism should be merged into fetishism because of overlap between the two conditions, and the DSM-5 subsequently did so in 2013.

DSM-5

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disordersmental health disordersDSM-V
Under the DSM-5, fetishism is sexual arousal from nonliving objects or specific nongenital body parts, excluding clothes used for cross-dressing (as that falls under transvestic disorder) and sex toys that are designed for genital stimulation. Martin Kafka argued that partialism should be merged into fetishism because of overlap between the two conditions, and the DSM-5 subsequently did so in 2013.

ICD-10

International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health ProblemsICDInternational Classification of Diseases
The ICD-10 definition is still limited to non-living objects.

Hair fetishism

Trichophiliahair fetishattraction to hair
Of the groups about body parts or features, 47% belonged to groups about feet (foot fetishism), 9% about body fluids, 9% about body size, 7% about hair (hair fetish), and 5% about muscles (muscle worship).

Muscle worship

agree withSthenolagniacratolagnia
Of the groups about body parts or features, 47% belonged to groups about feet (foot fetishism), 9% about body fluids, 9% about body size, 7% about hair (hair fetish), and 5% about muscles (muscle worship).

Navel fetishism

navelnavel fetishists
Less popular groups focused on navels (navel fetishism), legs, body hair, mouth, and nails, among other things.