Shōgun

shogunateShogunBakufuSei-i TaishōgunshogunalSeii TaishogunshogunatesWarlordShogunal governmentShoguns
The Shōgun was the military dictator of Japan during most of the period spanning from 1185 to 1868.wikipedia
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Japan

JPNJapaneseJP
The Shōgun was the military dictator of Japan during most of the period spanning from 1185 to 1868.
From the 12th century until 1868, Japan was ruled in the name of the Emperor by successive feudal military shōguns.

Kamakura period

Japan (Kamakura period)KamakuraKamakura-period
Nominally appointed by the Emperor, shōguns were usually the de facto rulers of the country, though during part of the Kamakura period shōguns were themselves figureheads.
The Kamakura period is a period of Japanese history that marks the governance by the Kamakura shogunate, officially established in 1192 in Kamakura by the first shōgun, Minamoto no Yoritomo.

Minamoto no Yoritomo

YoritomoMinamoto Yoritomoelder brother
When Minamoto no Yoritomo gained political ascendency over Japan in 1185, the title was revived to regularize his position, making him the first shōgun in the usually understood sense. Minamoto no Yoritomo seized power from the central government and aristocracy and established a feudal system based in Kamakura in which the private military, the samurai, gained some political powers while the Emperor and the aristocracy remained the de jure rulers.
Minamoto no Yoritomo was the founder and the first shōgun of the Kamakura shogunate of Japan.

Emperor of Japan

EmperorMonarchJapanese Emperor
Nominally appointed by the Emperor, shōguns were usually the de facto rulers of the country, though during part of the Kamakura period shōguns were themselves figureheads.
Since the establishment of the first shogunate in 1199, the Emperors of Japan have rarely taken on a role as supreme battlefield commander, unlike many Western monarchs.

Tokugawa Yoshinobu

Hitotsubashi YoshinobuHitotsubashi KeikiYoshinobu
Nevertheless, the institution, known in English as the shogunate, persisted for nearly 700 years, ending when Tokugawa Yoshinobu relinquished the office to Emperor Meiji in 1867 as part of the Meiji Restoration.
Prince Tokugawa Yoshinobu was the 15th and last shōgun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan.

Emperor Meiji

Meiji EmperorMeijiMutsuhito
Nevertheless, the institution, known in English as the shogunate, persisted for nearly 700 years, ending when Tokugawa Yoshinobu relinquished the office to Emperor Meiji in 1867 as part of the Meiji Restoration.
Under its rule, the shōgun governed Japan.

Sakanoue no Tamuramaro

Sakanoue TamuramaroTamuramaro
The most famous of these shōguns was Sakanoue no Tamuramaro.
Sakanoue no Tamuramaro was a general and shōgun of the early Heian period of Japan.

Daimyō

daimyofeudal lordlord
In the early 11th century, daimyō protected by samurai came to dominate internal Japanese politics.
Subordinate to the shōgun, and nominally to the Emperor and the kuge, daimyō were powerful feudal rulers from the 10th century to the middle 19th century in Japan.

Heian period

Japan (Heian period)HeianHeian era
Shōgun is the short form of Sei-i Taishōgun, a high military title from the Heian period. Originally, the title of Sei-i Taishōgun ("Commander-in-Chief of the Expeditionary Force Against the Barbarians") was given to military commanders during the early Heian period for the duration of military campaigns against the Emishi, who resisted the governance of the Kyoto-based imperial court.
By 801, the shōgun had defeated the Emishi and had extended the imperial domains to the eastern end of Honshū.

Samurai

bushibukewarrior
In the early 11th century, daimyō protected by samurai came to dominate internal Japanese politics. Minamoto no Yoritomo seized power from the central government and aristocracy and established a feudal system based in Kamakura in which the private military, the samurai, gained some political powers while the Emperor and the aristocracy remained the de jure rulers.
Emperor Kanmu introduced the title of sei'i-taishōgun, or shōgun, and began to rely on the powerful regional clans to conquer the Emishi.

Kamakura shogunate

KamakuraKamakura Bakufushogunate
The end of the Kamakura shogunate came when Kamakura fell in 1333, and the Hōjō Regency was destroyed.
The heads of the government were the shōguns.

Hōjō clan

HōjōHojo clanHojo
The end of the Kamakura shogunate came when Kamakura fell in 1333, and the Hōjō Regency was destroyed. Yoritomo's wife's family, the Hōjō, seized power from the Kamakura shōguns.
Despite the title, in practice the family wielded actual governmental power during this period compared to both the Kamakura shōguns, or the Imperial Court in Kyoto, whose authority was largely symbolic.

Meiji Restoration

Meiji RevolutionRestorationindustrialization of Japan
Nevertheless, the institution, known in English as the shogunate, persisted for nearly 700 years, ending when Tokugawa Yoshinobu relinquished the office to Emperor Meiji in 1867 as part of the Meiji Restoration.
The Tokugawa shogunate came to its official end on November9, 1867, when Tokugawa Yoshinobu, the 15th Tokugawa shōgun, "put his prerogatives at the Emperor's disposal" and resigned 10 days later.

Ashikaga Takauji

Takauji AshikagaTakauji
Around 1334–1336, Ashikaga Takauji helped Daigo regain his throne. In 1338, Ashikaga Takauji, like Minamoto no Yoritomo, a descendant of the Minamoto princes, was awarded the title of sei-i taishōgun and established the Ashikaga shogunate, which lasted until 1573.
Ashikaga Takauji was the founder and first shōgun of the Ashikaga shogunate.

Ōtomo no Otomaro

Ōtomo no Otomaro was the first Sei-i Taishōgun.
He was the first to hold the title of sei-i taishōgun.

Military dictatorship

juntamilitary regimemilitary junta
The Shōgun was the military dictator of Japan during most of the period spanning from 1185 to 1868.

Kamakura

Kamakura, KanagawaKamakura, JapanKamakura – The Muromachi and Edo periods
Minamoto no Yoritomo seized power from the central government and aristocracy and established a feudal system based in Kamakura in which the private military, the samurai, gained some political powers while the Emperor and the aristocracy remained the de jure rulers.
However, this and similar legends appear to have arisen only after Kamatari's descendant Fujiwara no Yoritsune became the fourth shōgun of the Kamakura shogunate in 1226, some time after the name Kamakura appears in the historical record.

Kenmu Restoration

brief periodbriefly restoredKemmu restoration
During the Kenmu Restoration, after the fall of the Kamakura shogunate in 1333, another short-lived shōgun arose.
The Emperor's role had been usurped by the Minamoto and Hōjō families ever since Minamoto no Yoritomo had obtained from the Emperor the title of shōgun in 1192, ruling thereafter from Kamakura.

Ashikaga shogunate

Muromachi shogunateAshikagaAshikaga shōgun
In 1338, Ashikaga Takauji, like Minamoto no Yoritomo, a descendant of the Minamoto princes, was awarded the title of sei-i taishōgun and established the Ashikaga shogunate, which lasted until 1573.
The heads of government were the shōgun.

Ashikaga Tadayoshi

Tadayoshi
However, Prince Moriyoshi was later put under house arrest and, in 1335, killed by Ashikaga Tadayoshi.
Ashikaga Tadayoshi was a general of the Northern and Southern Courts period (1337–92) of Japanese history and a close associate of his elder brother Takauji, the first Muromachi shōgun.

Muromachi period

Japan (Muromachi period)MuromachiMuromachi era
The Ashikaga had their headquarters in the Muromachi district of Kyoto, and the time during which they ruled is also known as the Muromachi period.
The period marks the governance of the Muromachi or Ashikaga shogunate (Muromachi bakufu or Ashikaga bakufu), which was officially established in 1338 by the first Muromachi shōgun, Ashikaga Takauji, two years after the brief Kenmu Restoration (1333–36) of imperial rule was brought to a close.

Emishi

Emishi peopleEbisuThirty-Eight Year War
Originally, the title of Sei-i Taishōgun ("Commander-in-Chief of the Expeditionary Force Against the Barbarians") was given to military commanders during the early Heian period for the duration of military campaigns against the Emishi, who resisted the governance of the Kyoto-based imperial court.
The newly appointed shōgun general, Sakanoue no Tamuramaro, then attacked the Isawa Emishi, relentlessly using soldiers trained in horse archery.

Oda Nobunaga

Nobunaga OdaNobunagaGenma Lord
While the title of Shōgun went into abeyance due to technical reasons, Oda Nobunaga and his successor, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, who later obtained the position of Imperial Regent, gained far greater power than any of their predecessors had.
Nobunaga's successful subjugation of much of Honshu enabled the later successes of his allies Hideyoshi and Tokugawa Ieyasu toward the goal of national unification by subjugating local daimyōs under a hereditary shogunate, which was ultimately accomplished in 1603 when Ieyasu was granted the title of shōgun by Emperor Go-Yōzei following the successful Sekigahara Campaign of 1600.

Northern Court

Northern PretenderNorthern EmperorEmperors of Northern Court
Two imperial families – the senior Northern Court and the junior Southern Court – had a claim to the throne.
In 1333, when the Southern Emperor Go-Daigo staged the Kenmu Restoration and revolted against the Hōjō Kamakura shogunate, the newly minted shōgun Ashikaga Takauji (ironically, by Emperor Go-Daigo himself) responded by declaring Emperor Kōgon, Go-Daigo's second cousin once removed and the son of an earlier emperor, Emperor Go-Fushimi of the Jimyōin-tō, as the new emperor.

Tokugawa Ieyasu

Ieyasu TokugawaIeyasuMatsudaira Motoyasu
Tokugawa Ieyasu seized power and established a government at Edo (now known as Tokyo) in 1600.
Tokugawa Ieyasu was the founder and first shōgun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan, which effectively ruled Japan from the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 until the Meiji Restoration in 1868.