A report on Sichuan and Shaanxi

Bronze head from Sanxingdui, dating from the Shu kingdom
Shaanxi People's Government
Golden Sun Bird from Jinsha site
Shaanxi cuisine
A stone-carved gate pillar, or que, 6 m in total height, located at the tomb of Gao Yi in Ya'an, Sichuan, built during the Eastern Han dynasty (25–220 CE)
Terracotta Army
Warlords in China around 194; Liu Bei's takeover of Yi Province meant he seized the positions of Liu Biao and Zhang Lu eventually
Education Department of Shaanxi Province
The Leshan Giant Buddha, built during the latter half of the Tang dynasty (618–907).
Shaanxi Science and Technology Museum
Japanese bombers bombing a Chinese road in Sichuan during WW2
Temple of the Chenghuangshen (City God) of Weinan.
Shops in Jundao, a town devastated by the 2008 Sichuan earthquake
Guangren Temple of the Tibetan Buddhist tradition in Xi'an.
Giant pandas eating bamboo in Chengdu, Sichuan
Road to the stupa of the Famen Temple (Chinese Buddhist).
The capital of Sichuan, Chengdu.
Temple of Xuanyuan in Huangling, Yan'an.
IFS Chengdu Mall Entrance
Waldorf Astoria Hotels & Resorts in Chengdu
Nijia Qiao, South Renmin Road, Chengdu
Sichuan–Tibet Highway passes by Lake Kasa in Luhuo County.
The Yi are the largest ethnic minority group in Sichuan.
Typical vernacular house in Sichuan
Extent of present-day Sichuanese language
Sichuan Education Department
Larix potaninii in autumn colour.
Garzê Prefecture
Zitong County
Linpan in Chengdu Plain is a well-known landmark in Chengdu Plain, Sichuan.
View of the Temple of the Yellow Dragon (Chinese Buddhism) in Huanglong.
Statues of buddhas at Litang Monastery of the Tibetan tradition.
A pavilion of the Shangqing Temple (Taoist) in Qingchengshan, Chengdu.
Golden Temple of Mount Emei (Chinese Buddhism).
Kung Pao chicken, one of the best known dishes of Sichuan cuisine
Mapo doufu
Hot pot in Mala style
Dandan noodles
Mixed sauce noodles ({{lang|zh-hans|杂酱面}})
Jiuzhaigou
Yading
Huanglong Scenic and Historic Interest Area
Waterfalls at Mount Qincheng
Bipenggou Valley
Mount Siguniang Scenic Area
Hailuogou Glacier
Dujiangyan irrigation system
alt=|Mount Emei
{{ill|Baba Temple|zh|巴巴寺}}, a Chinese Sufi mosque in Langzhong.
{{ill|Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Chengdu|es|Catedral de la Inmaculada Concepción de Chengdu}} (Roman Catholic)
St John's Cathedral, Langzhong (Anglican)
alt=|Mount Emei

Officially part of Northwest China, it borders the province-level divisions of Shanxi (NE, E), Henan (E), Hubei (SE), Chongqing (S), Sichuan (SW), Gansu (W), Ningxia (NW) and Inner Mongolia (N).

- Shaanxi

Sichuan neighbors the Qinghai to the northwest, Gansu to the north, Shaanxi to the northeast, Chongqing to the east, Guizhou to the southeast, Yunnan to the south, and the Tibet Autonomous Region to the west.

- Sichuan

9 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Gansu

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Landlocked province in Northwest China.

Landlocked province in Northwest China.

The ruins of a Han dynasty (202 BC–220 AD) Chinese watchtower made of rammed earth at Dunhuang, Gansu province, the eastern edge of the Silk Road
Xindian culture era jar with two lug handles uncovered in Gansu, dating to around 1,000 BC
The ruins of a gate at Yumen Pass, built during the Jin dynasty (266–420)
Jiayuguan Fort
Danxia landform in Zhangye
Gates of the provincial government complex in Lanzhou
Farmland in Linxia
Shopping mall in Lanzhou
Lanzhou city
A painting of the Buddhist Manjushri, from the Yulin Caves of Gansu, Tangut-led Western Xia dynasty (1038–1227 AD)
These rammed earth ruins of a granary in Hecang Fortress, located ~11 km (7 miles) northeast of the Western-Han-era Yumen Pass, were built during the Western Han (202 BC – 9 AD) and significantly rebuilt during the Western Jin (280–316 AD).
A terracotta warrior from Gansu, with traces of polychrome and gold, from the Tang dynasty (618–907)
Maijishan Grottoes
Fertile fields near Wuwei
Crescent Lake, Dunhuang
Qilian Mountains southeast of Jiuquan
Terrace farms near Tianshui
Grasslands in Min County
Wetland by the Yellow River, Maqu County
Main hall of a Chan temple of Lanzhou.
Temple of the Chenghuangshen (Idol) of Lanzhou.
Nanhua Amituo Fo Temple of Chinese Buddhism seen on a hill above the roofs of the Yu Baba Gongbei, a Sufi shrine.
Labrang Monastery of Tibetan Buddhism in Gannan.
Village temple in Linxia County.
Linxia Dongguan Mosque
Lanzhou Xiguan Mosque

The seventh-largest administrative district by area at 453700 km2, Gansu lies between the Tibetan and Loess plateaus and borders Mongolia (Govi-Altai Province), Inner Mongolia and Ningxia to the north, Xinjiang and Qinghai to the west, Sichuan to the south and Shaanxi to the east.

Qin dynasty

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Map showing major states of Eastern Zhou
Map of the Warring States. Qin is shown in pink
Map of the Growth of Qin
Map showing the unification of Qin during 230–221 BC
Qin dynasty's expansion to the south
Stone rubbing of a Han dynasty carved relief depicting Jing Ke's assassination attempt on Qin Shi Huang (right) holding an imperial jade disc. Jing Ke (left) is held by a court physician (background). The dagger is stuck in the pillar. A soldier (far right) rushes to save his emperor.
Dujiangyan, an irrigation project completed in 256 BC during the Warring States period of China by the State of Qin. It is located on the Min River in Sichuan, near the provincial capital of Chengdu. Although a reinforced concrete weir has replaced Li Bing's original weighted bamboo baskets, the layout of the infrastructure remains the same and is still in use today to irrigate over 5,300 square kilometers of land in the region.
Stone slab with twelve small seal characters. Qin Dynasty (221 – 207 BC). The 12 characters on this slab of floor brick affirm that it is an auspicious moment for the First Emperor to ascend the throne, as the country is united and no men will be dying along the road. Small seal scripts were standardized by the First Emperor of China after he gained control of the country, and evolved from the larger seal scripts of previous dynasties. The text on it is "海内皆臣,歲登成熟,道毋飢人".
Terracotta Army, museum of the grave of Qin Shi Huang.
Qin warriors of the Terracotta Army.
An edict in bronze from the reign of the second Qin Emperor

The Qin dynasty, or Ch'in dynasty in Wade–Giles romanization , was the first dynasty of Imperial China, lasting from 221 to 206 BC. Named for its heartland in Qin state (modern Gansu and Shaanxi), the dynasty was founded by Qin Shi Huang, the First Emperor of Qin.

Prior to the events leading to Qin dominance over China, they had gained possession of much of Sichuan to the southwest.

A map of the Western Han dynasty in 2 AD
Principalities and centrally-administered commanderies

Protectorate of the Western Regions (Tarim Basin)

Han dynasty

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Imperial dynasty of China , established by Liu Bang (Emperor Gao) and ruled by the House of Liu.

Imperial dynasty of China , established by Liu Bang (Emperor Gao) and ruled by the House of Liu.

A map of the Western Han dynasty in 2 AD
Principalities and centrally-administered commanderies

Protectorate of the Western Regions (Tarim Basin)
Thirteen direct-controlled commanderies including the capital region (Yellow) and ten semi-autonomous kingdoms of the early periods, 195 BC
Belt Buckle with nomadic-inspired zoomorphic design, manufactured in China for the Xiongnu. Mercury-gilded bronze (a Chinese technique). North China, 3rd-2nd century BC.
Map showing the expansion of Han dynasty in the 2nd century BC
The ruins of a Han-dynasty watchtower made of rammed earth at Dunhuang, Gansu province, the eastern edge of the Silk Road.
These rammed earth ruins of a granary in Hecang Fortress, located ~11 km (7 miles) northeast of the Western-Han-era Yumen Pass, were built during the Western Han (202 BC – 9 AD) and significantly rebuilt during the Western Jin (280–316 AD).
Situation of warlords and peasant forces at the beginning of Eastern Han dynasty
Eastern Han inscriptions on a lead ingot, using barbarous Greek alphabet in the style of the Kushans, excavated in Shaanxi, 1st–2nd century AD
Preserved arrow, Western Han
A late Eastern Han (25–220 CE) Chinese tomb mural showing lively scenes of a banquet (yanyin 宴飲), dance and music (wuyue 舞樂), acrobatics (baixi 百戲), and wrestling (xiangbu 相撲), from the Dahuting Tomb, on the southern bank of the Siuhe River in Zhengzhou, Henan province (just west of Xi County)
A mural from an Eastern Han tomb at Zhucun (朱村), Luoyang, Henan province; the two figures in the foreground are playing liubo, with the playing mat between them, and the liubo game board to the side of the mat.
Brick Relief with Acrobatic Performance, Han Dynasty (202 BCE – 220 CE)
Detail of a mural showing two women wearing Hanfu silk robes, from the Dahuting Tomb of the late Eastern Han Dynasty (25–220 CE), located in Zhengzhou, Henan
Han period inscribed bamboo-slips of Sun Bin's Art of War, unearthed in Yinque Mountain, Linyi, Shandong.
A fragment of the Xiping Stone Classics; these stone-carved Five Classics installed during Emperor Ling's reign along the roadside of the Imperial University (right outside Luoyang) were made at the instigation of Cai Yong (132–192 CE), who feared the Classics housed in the imperial library were being interpolated by University Academicians.
A silk banner from Mawangdui, Changsha, Hunan province. It was draped over the coffin of Lady Dai (d. 168 BCE), wife of the Marquess Li Cang (利蒼) (d. 186 BCE), chancellor for the Kingdom of Changsha.
A part of a Daoist manuscript, ink on silk, 2nd century BCE, Han Dynasty, unearthed from Mawangdui tomb 3rd, Changsha, Hunan Province.
An Eastern-Han bronze statuette of a mythical chimera (qilin), 1st century CE
A scene of historic paragons of filial piety conversing with one another, Chinese painted artwork on a lacquered basketwork box, excavated from an Eastern-Han tomb of what was the Chinese Lelang Commandery in Korean Peninsula.
A rubbing of a Han pictorial stone showing an ancestral worship hall (cítáng 祠堂)
Animalistic guardian spirits of day and night wearing Chinese robes, Han dynasty paintings on ceramic tile; Michael Loewe writes that the hybrid of man and beast in art and religious beliefs predated the Han and remained popular during the first half of Western Han and the Eastern Han.
The Gansu Flying Horse, depicted in full gallop, bronze sculpture, h 34.5 cm. Wuwei, Gansu, China, AD 25–220
A mural showing chariots and cavalry, from the Dahuting Tomb (Chinese: 打虎亭漢墓, Pinyin: Dahuting Han mu) of the late Eastern Han Dynasty (25–220 AD), located in Zhengzhou, Henan province, China
Gold coins of the Eastern Han dynasty
A Han-dynasty iron ji (polearm) and iron dagger
A gilded bronze oil lamp in the shape of a kneeling female servant, dated 2nd century BC, found in the tomb of Dou Wan, wife of Liu Sheng, King of Zhongshan; its sliding shutter allows for adjustments in the direction and brightness in light while it also traps smoke within the body.
An array of bronze bells, Western Han dynasty
Ornamental belt buckle, decorated with Chinese mythical creatures. Chiseled and hammered gold, late Han period.
The physical exercise chart; a painting on silk depicting the practice of Qigong Taiji; unearthed in 1973 in Hunan Province, China, from the 2nd-century BC Western Han burial site of Mawangdui, Tomb Number 3.
A pair of stone-carved que (闕) located at the temple of Mount Song in Dengfeng. (Eastern Han dynasty.)
A pair of Han period stone-carved que (闕) located at Babaoshan, Beijing.
A stone-carved pillar-gate, or que (闕), 6 m (20 ft) in total height, located at the tomb of Gao Yi in Ya'an. (Eastern Han dynasty.){{sfnp|Liu|2002|p=55}}
An Eastern-Han vaulted tomb chamber at Luoyang made of small bricks
A Han-dynasty pottery model of two men operating a winnowing machine with a crank handle and a tilt hammer used to pound grain.
A modern replica of Zhang Heng's seismometer
An early Western Han dynasty silk map found in tomb 3 of Mawangdui, depicting the Kingdom of Changsha and Kingdom of Nanyue in southern China (note: the south direction is oriented at the top).
An Eastern Han dynasty pottery boat model with a steering rudder at the stern and anchor at the bow.

According to the Records of the Grand Historian, after the collapse of the Qin dynasty the hegemon Xiang Yu appointed Liu Bang as prince of the small fief of Hanzhong, named after its location on the Han River (in modern southwest Shaanxi).

Zhang Lu's rebellion, in modern northern Sichuan and southern Shaanxi, was not quelled until 215 AD. Zhang Jue's massive rebellion across eight provinces was annihilated by Han forces within a year, however the following decades saw much smaller recurrent uprisings.

Qinghai

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Landlocked province in the northwest of the People's Republic of China.

Landlocked province in the northwest of the People's Republic of China.

The Dongguan Mosque in Qinghai
Oil well in Tsaidam (Qaidam), Qinghai
View of the Qinghai Lake.
China National Highway 109 in Qinghai
The Khoshut Khanate (1642–1717) based in the Tibetan Plateau
Chiang Kai-shek, leader of Nationalist China (right), meets with the Muslim generals Ma Bufang (second from left), and Ma Buqing (first from left) in Xining, Qinghai, in August 1942
Nyenpo Yurtse, Jigzhi County, Qinghai
Riyue Mountain in Qinghai
A Taoist temple dedicated to Jiutian Xuannü on Mount Fenghuang, in Lunmalong village, Duoba, Xining
A Buddhist temple on Riyue Mountain, in Huangyuan County, Xining
Mosques and Chinese folk temples characterising the skyline of Huangyuan County
Rongwo Tibetan Buddhist Monastery in Tongren County
Great Mosque of Duoba, Xining

Qinghai borders Gansu on the northeast, Xinjiang on the northwest, Sichuan on the southeast and the Tibet Autonomous Region on the southwest.

The Dungan revolt (1862–77) devastated the Hui Muslim population of Shaanxi, shifting the Hui center of population to Gansu and Qinghai.

Hubei

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Landlocked province of the People's Republic of China, and is part of the Central China region.

Landlocked province of the People's Republic of China, and is part of the Central China region.

Detail of an embroidered silk gauze ritual garment from a 4th-century BC, Zhou era tomb at Mashan, Jiangling County, Hubei
Three Gorges area
Temple of Worship at Wudang Mountain
Yellow Crane Tower
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Liangtai River valley in Xingshan County. This is an important agricultural area since planting rice and other crops is more feasible here than on the surrounding mountain slopes
The Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River
Tea plantations on the western slopes of the Muyu Valley
Hubei Provincial Museum
Hubei Museum of Art
Hubei Provincial Library
Garden At Huazhong Agricultural University
Boats on the Yangtze River in Wuhan
East side of Jingzhou old city wall
University Stadium of Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Wuhan
Taihui Taoist Temple in Jingzhou
Baotong Buddhist Temple in Wuhan
Guangde Buddhist Temple in Xiangyang
Ancestral shrine in Hong'an, Huanggang
Rural Buddhist community temple in Xianning

Hubei borders the provinces of Henan to the north, Anhui to the east, Jiangxi to the southeast, Hunan to the south, Chongqing to the west, and Shaanxi to the northwest.

As of 2022, Hubei hosts 130 institutions of higher education, ranking sixth together with Hunan (130) among all Chinese provinces after Jiangsu (168), Guangdong (160), Henan (156), Shandong (153), and Sichuan (134).

Map of China's prefectural level divisions

Administrative divisions of China

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The administrative divisions of China have consisted of several levels since ancient times, due to China's large population and geographical area.

The administrative divisions of China have consisted of several levels since ancient times, due to China's large population and geographical area.

Map of China's prefectural level divisions
Map of China's county-level divisions
The Qing dynasty in 1820, with provinces in yellow, military governorates and protectorates in light yellow, tributary states in orange

Chengdu (Sichuan)

Xi'an (Shaanxi)

Chongqing

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Municipality in southwest China.

Municipality in southwest China.

A street scene in Chongqing, c. 1944
A sunset view of Jiefangbei CBD and Hongya Cave, taken in 2017
Map including Chongqing (labeled as 重慶 CH'UNG-CH'ING (CHUNGKING)) (AMS, 1954)
Topography of Chongqing
Qutang Gorge on the Yangtze River
In the spring and fall, downtown Chongqing is often enshrouded in fog.
The Great Hall of the People serves as the venue for major political conferences in Chongqing
Jiefangbei CBD, Yuzhong Peninsula of Chongqing at night
Jiefangbei (People's Liberation Monument), the landmark and center of Chongqing
Chongqing products treemap, 2020
Entrance to the Chongqing Nankai Secondary School
A train of Chongqing Rail Transit Line 2 coming through a residential building at Liziba station.
An aerial tramway across the Yangtse river in Chongqing CBD Photo by Chen Hualin
Hydrofoil on the Yangtze in the outer reaches of the municipality
Chongqing funicular railway
View of Chaotianmen Bridge across the Yangtze River in Chongqing
Zhongshan Ancient Town, Jiangjin, Chongqing
Chongqing Grand Theater
Martyrs' Cemetery
Chongqing Art Museum
The Hongya Cave (Hongya-dong) traditional Bayu-style stilted houses at Jiefangbei CBD
The steep path up to the front gate of Fishing Town
Ciqikou ancient road in Shapingba District
Typical Chongqing hot pot served with minced shrimp, tripes, pork aorta, goose intestine, and kidney slices.
Chongqing Xiao mian with peas and spicy bean paste
Laziji is famous for its crispy texture
Jiangbeizui CBD from above, taken in 2018
Chaotianmen Bridge connects Jiangbei District with Nan'an District of Chongqing, taken in 2018
Jiefangbei ({{zh|c=解放碑|l=People's Liberation Monument|labels=no}}) is a World War II victory monument
Raffles City Chongqing, sitting in the confluence of Yangtze and Jialing River

During the Republic of China (ROC) era, Chongqing was a municipality located within Sichuan Province.

It borders the following provinces: Hubei in the east, Hunan in the southeast, Guizhou in the south, Sichuan in the west and northwest, and Shaanxi to the north in its northeast corner.

Sui dynasty c. 609

Sui dynasty

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Short-lived imperial dynasty of China of pivotal significance .

Short-lived imperial dynasty of China of pivotal significance .

Sui dynasty c. 609
Sui China divisions under Yangdi (western regions not depicted)
Administrative division of the Sui dynasty circa 610 AD
A Sui dynasty pilgrim flask made of stoneware
Tomb of An Bei panel showing a Sui dynasty banquet with Sogdian dance and music, 589 AD.
Chinese swords of the Sui dynasty, about 600, found near Luoyang. The P-shaped furniture of the bottom sword's scabbard is similar to and may have been derived from sword scabbards of the Sarmatians and Sassanians.
Strolling About in Spring, by Zhan Ziqian, Sui era artist
Model of a Pipa Player, Sui Dynasty
A Sui dynasty stone statue of the Avalokitesvara Boddhisattva (Guanyin)
Yang Guang depicted as Emperor of Sui

Founded by Emperor Wen of Sui, the Sui dynasty capital was Chang'an (which was renamed Daxing, modern Xi'an, Shaanxi) from 581–605 and later Luoyang (605–618).

Besides employing Xianbei and other Chinese ethnic groups for the fight against Chen, Emperor Wen also employed the service of people from southeastern Sichuan, which Sui had recently conquered.

Overview map of the route of the Long March
Light red areas show Communist enclaves. Areas marked by a blue "X" were overrun by Kuomintang forces during the Fourth Encirclement Campaign, forcing the Fourth Red Army (north) and the Second Red Army (south) to retreat to more western enclaves (dotted lines). The dashed line is the route of the First Red Army from Jiangxi. The withdrawal of all three Red Armies ends in the northeast enclave of Shaanxi.

Long March

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Military retreat undertaken by the Red Army of the Communist Party of China (CPC), the forerunner of the People's Liberation Army, to evade the pursuit of the National Army of the Chinese Nationalist Party (CNP/KMT).

Military retreat undertaken by the Red Army of the Communist Party of China (CPC), the forerunner of the People's Liberation Army, to evade the pursuit of the National Army of the Chinese Nationalist Party (CNP/KMT).

Overview map of the route of the Long March
Light red areas show Communist enclaves. Areas marked by a blue "X" were overrun by Kuomintang forces during the Fourth Encirclement Campaign, forcing the Fourth Red Army (north) and the Second Red Army (south) to retreat to more western enclaves (dotted lines). The dashed line is the route of the First Red Army from Jiangxi. The withdrawal of all three Red Armies ends in the northeast enclave of Shaanxi.
Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek encircled the Communists in Jiangxi in 1934.
Map drawn by the Red Army Command before the Battle of Xiangjiang
The Luding Bridge
Tiger Leaping Gorge in the Jade Dragon Snow Mountain massif of western Yunnan province
A Communist leader addressing Long March survivors

However, the most famous began in the Jiangxi (Jiangxi) province in October 1934 and ended in the Shaanxi province in October 1935.

When several smaller units formed the Fourth Red Army under Zhang Guotao in the Sichuan–Shaanxi border area, no standard nomenclature of the armies of the CCP existed; moreover, during the Chinese Civil War, central control of separate Communist-controlled enclaves within China was limited.