A report on Shaanxi

Shaanxi People's Government
Shaanxi cuisine
Terracotta Army
Education Department of Shaanxi Province
Shaanxi Science and Technology Museum
Temple of the Chenghuangshen (City God) of Weinan.
Guangren Temple of the Tibetan Buddhist tradition in Xi'an.
Road to the stupa of the Famen Temple (Chinese Buddhist).
Temple of Xuanyuan in Huangling, Yan'an.

Landlocked province of the People's Republic of China.

- Shaanxi

82 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Qinghai

6 links

Landlocked province in the northwest of the People's Republic of China.

Landlocked province in the northwest of the People's Republic of China.

The Dongguan Mosque in Qinghai
Oil well in Tsaidam (Qaidam), Qinghai
View of the Qinghai Lake.
China National Highway 109 in Qinghai
The Khoshut Khanate (1642–1717) based in the Tibetan Plateau
Chiang Kai-shek, leader of Nationalist China (right), meets with the Muslim generals Ma Bufang (second from left), and Ma Buqing (first from left) in Xining, Qinghai, in August 1942
Nyenpo Yurtse, Jigzhi County, Qinghai
Riyue Mountain in Qinghai
A Taoist temple dedicated to Jiutian Xuannü on Mount Fenghuang, in Lunmalong village, Duoba, Xining
A Buddhist temple on Riyue Mountain, in Huangyuan County, Xining
Mosques and Chinese folk temples characterising the skyline of Huangyuan County
Rongwo Tibetan Buddhist Monastery in Tongren County
Great Mosque of Duoba, Xining

The Dungan revolt (1862–77) devastated the Hui Muslim population of Shaanxi, shifting the Hui center of population to Gansu and Qinghai.

Central Plains Mandarin

2 links

Central Plains Mandarin, or Zhongyuan Mandarin, is a variety of Mandarin Chinese spoken in the central and southern parts of Shaanxi, Henan, southwestern part of Shanxi, southern part of Gansu, far southern part of Hebei, northern Anhui, northern parts of Jiangsu, southern Xinjiang and southern Shandong.

The Jin dynasty (yellow) at its greatest extent, c. 280, during the Western Jin dynasty

Jin dynasty (266–420)

0 links

Imperial dynasty of China that existed from 266 to 420.

Imperial dynasty of China that existed from 266 to 420.

The Jin dynasty (yellow) at its greatest extent, c. 280, during the Western Jin dynasty
Molded-brick mural, identified as the "Seven Sages of the Bamboo Grove and Rong Qiqi", one of two walls a part of the coffin found in a tomb of the capital region of the Southern dynasties (5th–6th. c.), second half of the fifth century, at Xishanqiao, near Nanjing. 88 x 240 cm. Nanjing Museum. This part of the murals may reflect a composition of the famous Lu Tanwei, considered as the single greatest painter of all times by the Chinese critic Xi He (act. 500–536) : ref. from China : Dawn of a Golden Age, 200–750 AD, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Yale University Press 2004. We can recognize Ji Kang (223–262), on the left, under a gingko tree.
Hunping jar of the Western Jin, with Buddhist figures.
Menfa Politics: Administrative divisions of Eastern Jin dynasty, as of 382 AD
Lacquer screen, from the tomb of Sima Jinlong, 484 CE. Untypical of Northern Wei styles, it was probably brought from the court of the Jin dynasty by Sima Jinlong's father. Alternatively, it could be a Northern Wei work strongly influenced by Jin artistic styles, such as the work of Gu Kaizhi.
Yue ware with motif, 3rd century CE, Western Jin, Zhejiang.
Scene of the Admonitions Scroll, traditionally considered as a Jin court painting by Gu Kaizhi (ca. 345–406)
Pottery tower, Western Jin, 265–317 CE.
Celadon lion-shaped bixie, Western Jin, 265–317 CE.
Celadon lian bowl with Buddhist figures, Western Jin, 265–317 CE.
Celadon jar, Eastern Jin, 317–420 CE.
Celadon jar with brown spots, Eastern Jin, 317-420 CE.
Western Jin porcelain female figurine.
Lacquer screen, from the tomb of Sima Jinlong, 484 CE. Untypical of Northern Wei styles, it was probably brought from the court of the Jin dynasty by Sima Jinlong's father. Alternatively, it could be a Northern Wei work strongly influenced by Jin artistic styles, such as the work of Gu Kaizhi.
Ornamental plaque, Eastern Jin dynasty, Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The capital of the Western Jin was initially in Luoyang, though it later moved to Chang'an (modern Xi'an, Shaanxi province).

Mount Liupan

3 links

Mountain range in northwestern China, located mostly in southern Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region.

Mountain range in northwestern China, located mostly in southern Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region.

Its southern section is known as Mount Long, which strides southeast through eastern Gansu and western Shaanxi province before joining into the Qinling Mountains, giving rise to regional names like "Longxi" (陇西, lit. "west of Mount Long"), "Longdong" (陇东, "east of Mount Long", referring to the Jing River valley basin region around eastern Pingliang, southern Qingyang and northern Xianyang) and "Longnan" (陇南, "south of Mount Long").

View from the North Peak

Mount Hua

4 links

View from the North Peak
An example of how steep the paths are up Mount Hua
The chess pavilion, from the top of the East peak
The Plank Walk (not part of the ascent)

Mount Hua is a mountain located near the city of Huayin in Shaanxi Province, about 120 km east of Xi'an.

Fenghao

1 links

Fenghao is the modern name of the twin city formed by the Western Zhou capitals of Feng and Hao on opposite banks of the Feng River near its confluence with the Wei River in Shaanxi, China.

A halal meat store sign in Hankou, ca. 1934–1935.

Hui people

6 links

East Asian ethnoreligious group predominantly composed of Chinese-speaking adherents of Islam.

East Asian ethnoreligious group predominantly composed of Chinese-speaking adherents of Islam.

A halal meat store sign in Hankou, ca. 1934–1935.
Halal (清真) restaurants offering Northwestern beef lamian can be found throughout the country
The minaret of the Dungan mosque in Karakol, Kyrgyzstan
Dungan mosque in Karakol, Kyrgyzstan
Muslim restaurant in Kunming, Yunnan
A halal (清真) shower house in Linxia City
A fence in Niujie with art depicting the minority ethnicities in China, including the Hui (回族)
Hui people praying in the Dongguan Mosque, Xining
An elderly Hui man.
Muslim restaurant in Xi'an
The Lhasa Great Mosque in Tibet
The Sufi mausoleum (gongbei) of Ma Laichi in Linxia City, China.
The Xianxian Mosque in Guangzhou
An ethnic Hui family celebrating Eid ul-Fitr in Ningxia.
Hui men praying in a mosque
Chiang Kai-shek, head of the Kuomintang with Muslim General Ma Fushou.
Ma Jiyuan, a Muslim General, at his wedding with Kuomintang flag.
Ma Bufang and Hui children in Egypt.
Ma Fuxiang
Chinese Generals pay tribute to the Sun Yat-sen Mausoleum at the Temple of the Azure Clouds in Beijing after the success of the Northern Expedition. From right to left, are Generals Cheng Jin, Zhang Zuobao, Chen Diaoyuan, Chiang Kai-shek, Woo Tsin-hang, Wen Xishan, Ma Fuxiang, Ma Sida and Bai Chongxi. (6 July 1928)
Ma Hetian

Western missionaries who entered Gansu and Shaanxi after the 18th century, on the other hand, considered the Hui in the north-western provinces an ethnic group between the Turkic, Han and Arab peoples.

Landscape near Hunyuan, Shanxi

Loess Plateau

1 links

Plateau in north-central China formed of loess, a clastic silt-like sediment formed by the accumulation of wind-blown dust.

Plateau in north-central China formed of loess, a clastic silt-like sediment formed by the accumulation of wind-blown dust.

Landscape near Hunyuan, Shanxi
Location of the Loess Plateau in China
Geomorphology of the Loess Plateau
This figure shows the change in geomorphology in the Loess Plateau. Adapted from Dai et al.1992. The geomorphology of the Loess Plateau changes from rocky mountains to alluvial plains to river valley belt. This pattern keeps repeating from the Northwest to the Southeast of the Loess Plateau.
This figure shows the relationship between wind direction and orientation of the linear bedrock ridges. The orientation of the bedrock ridges is parallel to the wind direction. Also, the direction of the ridges slowly rotates to the North in the central Loess Plateau.
298x298px
Because of the tectonic movement, the Loess Plateau was uplifted. Many mountains and basins were formed. Afterward, the East Asian Monsoon was formed, so the silt sediments were transported to the Loess Plateau. The silt slowly turned into loess because of the arid climate. Finally, since the winds are strong, many erosional features were formed.
This map shows the geological development and sediments thickness in the Loess Plateau. The thickness of the loess is the thickest in the Loess Plateau than the loess in other areas in China. From the scale, you can see the respected thickness of the loess in different colors. Adapted from Geomap.
This figure shows the thickness and distribution of loess in the Loess Plateau. Adapted from Sun 2002. The loess near the Liupanshan is the thickest which is around 200 m to 300 m while the loess near the Yellow River is around 100 m thick.
This map shows the distribution of loess with the locations of basins and mountains. Adapted from Sun 2002. Also, the direction of the prevailing winds is shown. It shows how and where the loess is transported The source of loess is the Gobi Desert and the desert nearby. However, the loess in the dessert is come from the Gobi Altay Mts, the Hangayn Mts, and the Qilian Mts.

It includes parts of the Chinese provinces of Gansu, Shaanxi and Shanxi.

Tongchuan

1 links

Tongchuan is a prefecture-level city located in central Shaanxi province, People's Republic of China on the southern fringe of the Loess Plateau that defines the northern half of the province (Shanbei) and the northern reaches of the Guanzhong Plain.

Ordos steppe landscape

Ordos Desert

3 links

Desert/steppe region in Northwest China, administrated under the prefecture of Ordos City in the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region .

Desert/steppe region in Northwest China, administrated under the prefecture of Ordos City in the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region .

Ordos steppe landscape
Xiangshawan (响沙湾), a desert tourist attraction in Ordos Desert
The region of Ordos
Bronze statuette of a man, Ordos, 3rd–1st century BCE. British Museum

The Ordos covers the southern section of Inner Mongolia, an Autonomous Region of China; Ningxia, an Autonomous Entity of China; and the Chinese Provinces of Shaanxi and Gansu.