A report on Shaanxi

Shaanxi People's Government
Shaanxi cuisine
Terracotta Army
Education Department of Shaanxi Province
Shaanxi Science and Technology Museum
Temple of the Chenghuangshen (City God) of Weinan.
Guangren Temple of the Tibetan Buddhist tradition in Xi'an.
Road to the stupa of the Famen Temple (Chinese Buddhist).
Temple of Xuanyuan in Huangling, Yan'an.

Landlocked province of the People's Republic of China.

- Shaanxi

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Woven silk textile from Tomb No. 1 at Mawangdui, Changsha, Hunan province, China, dated to the Western Han Era, 2nd century BCE

Silk Road

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Network of Eurasian trade routes active from the second century BCE until the mid-15th century.

Network of Eurasian trade routes active from the second century BCE until the mid-15th century.

Woven silk textile from Tomb No. 1 at Mawangdui, Changsha, Hunan province, China, dated to the Western Han Era, 2nd century BCE
Chinese jade and steatite plaques, in the Scythian-style animal art of the steppes. 4th–3rd century BCE. British Museum.
Achaemenid Persian Empire at its greatest extent, showing the Royal Road.
Soldier with a centaur in the Sampul tapestry, wool wall hanging, 3rd–2nd century BCE, Xinjiang Museum, Urumqi, Xinjiang, China.
A ceramic horse head and neck (broken from the body), from the Chinese Eastern Han dynasty (1st–2nd century CE)
Bronze coin of Constantius II (337–361), found in Karghalik, Xinjiang, China
The Silk Road transmission of Buddhism: Mahayana Buddhism first entered the Chinese Empire (Han dynasty) during the Kushan Era. The overland and maritime "Silk Roads" were interlinked and complementary, forming what scholars have called the "great circle of Buddhism".
Central Asia during Roman times, with the first Silk Road
A Westerner on a camel, Northern Wei dynasty (386–534)
Map showing Byzantium along with the other major silk road powers during China's Southern dynasties period of fragmentation.
Coin of Constans II (r. 641–648), who is named in Chinese sources as the first of several Byzantine emperors to send embassies to the Chinese Tang dynasty
A Chinese sancai statue of a Sogdian man with a wineskin, Tang dynasty (618–907)
The empires and city-states of the Horn of Africa, such as the Axumites were important trading partners in the ancient Silk Road.
After the Tang defeated the Gokturks, they reopened the Silk Road to the west.
Marco Polo's caravan on the Silk Road, 1380
Map of Eurasia and Africa showing trade networks, c. 870
The Round city of Baghdad between 767 and 912 was the most important urban node along the Silk Road.
A lion motif on Sogdian polychrome silk, 8th century, most likely from Bukhara
Yuan Dynasty era Celadon vase from Mogadishu.
Map of Marco Polo's travels in 1271–1295
Port cities on the maritime silk route featured on the voyages of Zheng He.
Plan of the Silk Road with its maritime branch
Yangshan Port of Shanghai, China
Port of Trieste
Trans-Eurasia Logistics
The Silk Road in the 1st century
The Nestorian Stele, created in 781, describes the introduction of Nestorian Christianity to China
Fragment of a wall painting depicting Buddha from a stupa in Miran along the Silk Road (200AD - 400AD)
A blue-eyed Central Asian monk teaching an East-Asian monk, Bezeklik, Turfan, eastern Tarim Basin, China, 9th century; the monk on the right is possibly Tocharian, although more likely Sogdian.
Bilingual edict (Greek and Aramaic) by Indian Buddhist King Ashoka, 3rd century BCE; see Edicts of Ashoka, from Kandahar. This edict advocates the adoption of "godliness" using the Greek term Eusebeia for Dharma. Kabul Museum.
A statue depicting Buddha giving a sermon, from Sarnath, 3000 km southwest of Urumqi, Xinjiang, 8th century
Iconographical evolution of the Wind God. Left: Greek Wind God from Hadda, 2nd century. Middle: Wind God from Kizil, Tarim Basin, 7th century. Right: Japanese Wind God Fujin, 17th century.
Caravanserai of Sa'd al-Saltaneh
Sultanhani caravanserai
Shaki Caravanserai, Shaki, Azerbaijan
Two-Storeyed Caravanserai, Baku, Azerbaijan
Bridge in Ani, capital of medieval Armenia
Taldyk pass
Medieval fortress of Amul, Turkmenabat, Turkmenistan
Zeinodin Caravanserai
Sogdian man on a Bactrian camel, sancai ceramic glaze, Chinese Tang dynasty (618–907)
The ruins of a Han dynasty (206 BCE – 220 CE) Chinese watchtower made of rammed earth at Dunhuang, Gansu province
A late Zhou or early Han Chinese bronze mirror inlaid with glass, perhaps incorporated Greco-Roman artistic patterns
A Chinese Western Han dynasty (202 BCE – 9 CE) bronze rhinoceros with gold and silver inlay
Han dynasty Granary west of Dunhuang on the Silk Road.
Green Roman glass cup unearthed from an Eastern Han dynasty (25–220 CE) tomb, Guangxi, southern China

Similar animal-shaped pieces of art and wrestler motifs on belts have been found in Scythian grave sites stretching from the Black Sea region all the way to Warring States era archaeological sites in Inner Mongolia (at Aluchaideng) and Shaanxi (at Keshengzhuang) in China.

Chengyu and Guanchi subgroups in Sichuan and Chongqing

Southwestern Mandarin

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Chengyu and Guanchi subgroups in Sichuan and Chongqing

Southwestern Mandarin, also known as Upper Yangtze Mandarin , is a Mandarin Chinese language spoken in much of Southwest China, including in Sichuan, Yunnan, Chongqing, Guizhou, most parts of Hubei, the northwestern part of Hunan, the northern part of Guangxi and some southern parts of Shaanxi and Gansu.

Shaanxi History Museum

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Main exhibition hall of the museum
Detail of the museum's architecture
Shaanxi History Museum plaque. Xi'an. 2011
Zhou Dynasty gold Bianzhong
Ceramic tomb figure of a horse in sancai glaze
Tomb figures of ladies
Gold stag with eagle's head and ten more heads in the antlers. Object inspired by Siberian Altai art. Nalinggaotu site, Shenmu County, near Xi'an.
Statues from Zhongshan Grottoes ({{lang|zh|钟山石窟}})
Painted tomb figures of guardians of Prince Qinjian from the Ming Dynasty
Soldiers from the Terracotta Army
Gilt silver jar with patterns of dancing horses, from the Tang Dynasty, Hejia Village hoard
Sculptures of the twelve Chinese zodiac figures, from the Tang Dynasty
The back of a Tang Dynasty bronze mirror
Tang Sancai tomb figures
An agate cup shaped in an animal head, from the Tang Dynasty, Hejia Village hoard

Shaanxi History Museum, which is located to the northwest of the Giant Wild Goose Pagoda in the ancient city Xi'an, in the Shaanxi province of China, is one of the first huge state museums with modern facilities in China and one of the largest.

Ordos City

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One of the twelve major subdivisions of Inner Mongolia, China.

One of the twelve major subdivisions of Inner Mongolia, China.

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Genghis Khan equestrian sculpture in Ordos City
Genghis Khan Mausoleum in the Ejin Horo Banner
Ordos Museum

It borders the prefecture-level divisions of Hohhot to the east, Baotou to the northeast, Bayan Nur to the north, Alxa League to the northwest, Wuhai to the west, the Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region to its southwest, and the provinces of Shaanxi and Shanxi to the south.

Wubu County

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Wubu County is located in the southeastern corner of Yulin City, in the north of Shaanxi Province, China, and on the western bank of the Yellow River.

Weicheng District, Xianyang

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Weicheng District is a district of Xianyang, Shaanxi, China.

Lantian Man

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Subspecies of Homo erectus known from an almost complete mandible from Chenchiawo Village discovered in 1963, and a partial skull from Gongwangling(公王岭) Village discovered in 1964, situated in Lantian County on the Loess Plateau.

Subspecies of Homo erectus known from an almost complete mandible from Chenchiawo Village discovered in 1963, and a partial skull from Gongwangling(公王岭) Village discovered in 1964, situated in Lantian County on the Loess Plateau.

Excavation of Lantian Man
Reconstruction of Lantian Man
Stone tools from the Middle Palaeolithic of Shaanxi

On July 19, 1963, a team funded by the Chinese Institute of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Palaeoanthropology (IVPP) recovered a fossil human mandible (lower jawbone) outside Chenchiawo Village, Lantian County in the Shaanxi Province of Northwest China.

Map of viceroys in Qing Dynasty of China

Viceroy of Shaan-Gan

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One of eight regional viceroys in the Qing dynasty.

One of eight regional viceroys in the Qing dynasty.

Map of viceroys in Qing Dynasty of China

The Viceroy of Shaan-Gan had jurisdiction over Shaanxi and Gansu provinces as well as western Inner Mongolia.

Gwoyeu Romatzyh

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System for writing Mandarin Chinese in the Latin alphabet.

System for writing Mandarin Chinese in the Latin alphabet.

Lin Yutang, who first proposed tonal spelling
Yuen Ren Chao, the chief designer of GR, as a young man (c. 1916)

Its pattern of tone spelling was retained in the standard spelling of the Chinese province of Shaanxi (shǎnxī, 陕西), which cannot be distinguished from Shanxi (shānxī, 山西) when written in pinyin without diacritics.

Plot of major historical capitals of China prior to the 20th century

Historical capitals of China

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List of historical capitals of China.

List of historical capitals of China.

Plot of major historical capitals of China prior to the 20th century

Xi'an (also romanized Sian), previously called Chang'an, and including its surrounding areas in present-day Shaanxi Province, was the capital of various dynasties, including: