Shakespeare's plays

playsShakespeareShakespeareanShakespeare playsShakespearean canonShakespearean dramahis playsplayPlays of William ShakespeareShakespeare play
Shakespeare's plays have the reputation of being among the greatest in the English language and in Western literature.wikipedia
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William Shakespeare

ShakespeareShakespeareanShakespearian
Shakespeare's plays have the reputation of being among the greatest in the English language and in Western literature.
His extant works, including collaborations, consist of some 39 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, some of uncertain authorship.

First Folio

FolioShakespeare's First Folio1623 edition
Many of his plays appeared in print as a series of quartos, but approximately half of them remained unpublished until 1623, when the posthumous First Folio was published. Among these actors were Richard Burbage (who played the title role in the first performances of many of Shakespeare's plays, including Hamlet, Othello, Richard III and King Lear), Richard Cowley (who played Verges in Much Ado About Nothing), William Kempe, (who played Peter in Romeo and Juliet and, possibly, Bottom in A Midsummer Night's Dream) and Henry Condell and John Heminges, who are most famous now for collecting and editing the plays of Shakespeare's First Folio (1623).
Printed in folio format and containing 36 plays (see list of Shakespeare's plays), it was prepared by Shakespeare's colleagues John Heminges and Henry Condell.

The Tempest

Tempestplay of the same namethe play
This structure did not apply to comedy, and those of Shakespeare's plays for which no clear source has been established, such as Love's Labour's Lost and The Tempest, are comedies. The final grouping of plays, called Shakespeare's late romances, include Pericles, Prince of Tyre, Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale and The Tempest.
The Tempest is a play by William Shakespeare, probably written in 1610–1611, and thought to be one of the last plays that Shakespeare wrote alone.

Raphael Holinshed

HolinshedHolinsheadHolinshed's Chronicles
Most of the Roman and Greek plays are based on Plutarch's Parallel Lives (from the 1579 English translation by Sir Thomas North), and the English history plays are indebted to Raphael Holinshed's 1587 Chronicles.
1525–1580?) was an English chronicler, whose work, commonly known as Holinshed's Chronicles, was one of the major sources used by William Shakespeare for a number of his plays.

The Winter's Tale

A Winter's TaleThe Winter’s TaleWinter's Tale
The final grouping of plays, called Shakespeare's late romances, include Pericles, Prince of Tyre, Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale and The Tempest.
The play has been intermittently popular, revived in productions in various forms and adaptations by some of the leading theatre practitioners in Shakespearean performance history, beginning after a long interval with David Garrick in his adaptation Florizel and Perdita (first performed in 1753 and published in 1756).

Henry VI, Part 1

Henry VIHenry VI, Part IHenry VI Part 1
Some regard Henry VI, Part 1 as the weakest of Shakespeare's plays.

Henry VI, Part 2

22 Henry VIII
Henry VI, Part 2 has the largest cast of all Shakespeare's plays and is seen by many critics as the best of the Henry VI trilogy.

Henry VI, Part 3

3 Henry VI3Part 3
Henry VI, Part 3 features the longest soliloquy in all of Shakespeare (3.2.124–195) and has more battle scenes (four on stage, one reported) than any other of Shakespeare's plays.

Richard III (play)

Richard IIIKing Richard IIIThe Tragedy of King Richard III
Among these actors were Richard Burbage (who played the title role in the first performances of many of Shakespeare's plays, including Hamlet, Othello, Richard III and King Lear), Richard Cowley (who played Verges in Much Ado About Nothing), William Kempe, (who played Peter in Romeo and Juliet and, possibly, Bottom in A Midsummer Night's Dream) and Henry Condell and John Heminges, who are most famous now for collecting and editing the plays of Shakespeare's First Folio (1623).
It is the second longest play in the Shakespearean canon after Hamlet and is the longest of the First Folio, whose version of Hamlet is shorter than its Quarto counterpart.

Plutarch

Lucius Mestrius PlutarchusLucius Mestrius Plutarchus,Plut.
Most of the Roman and Greek plays are based on Plutarch's Parallel Lives (from the 1579 English translation by Sir Thomas North), and the English history plays are indebted to Raphael Holinshed's 1587 Chronicles.
Shakespeare paraphrased parts of Thomas North's translation of selected Lives in his plays, and occasionally quoted from them verbatim.

Chronology of Shakespeare's plays

Chronology of Shakespeare playschronological order of their compositionchronology
While there is much dispute about the exact chronology of Shakespeare plays, the plays tend to fall into three main stylistic groupings.
This article presents a possible chronological listing of the composition of the plays of William Shakespeare.

List of Shakespearean characters (A–K)

List of Shakespearean charactersChorusComplete list of Shakespearean characters
This article is an index of characters appearing in the plays of William Shakespeare whose names begin with the letters A to K. Characters with names beginning with the letters L to Z may be found here.

Music in the plays of William Shakespeare

Music in the plays of William Shakespeare includes both music incidental to the plot, as song and dance, and also additional supplied both by Shakespeare's own company and subsequent performers.

Western literature

European literatureliteratureEuropean
Shakespeare's plays have the reputation of being among the greatest in the English language and in Western literature.

Shakespearean tragedy

tragedytragediesShakespearean
Traditionally, the plays are divided into the genres of tragedy, history, and comedy; they have been translated into every major living language, in addition to being continually performed all around the world.

Shakespearean history

history playshistorieshistory play
Traditionally, the plays are divided into the genres of tragedy, history, and comedy; they have been translated into every major living language, in addition to being continually performed all around the world.

Shakespearean comedy

comediescomedyShakespearean comedies
Traditionally, the plays are divided into the genres of tragedy, history, and comedy; they have been translated into every major living language, in addition to being continually performed all around the world.

Modern language

Modern Languagesliving languagemodern
Traditionally, the plays are divided into the genres of tragedy, history, and comedy; they have been translated into every major living language, in addition to being continually performed all around the world.

Language

languageslinguisticlinguistic diversity
Traditionally, the plays are divided into the genres of tragedy, history, and comedy; they have been translated into every major living language, in addition to being continually performed all around the world.

Early texts of Shakespeare's works

first quartosecond quartoThird Folio
Many of his plays appeared in print as a series of quartos, but approximately half of them remained unpublished until 1623, when the posthumous First Folio was published.

Shakespearean problem play

problem playsproblem playcertain plays
However, modern criticism has labelled some of these plays "problem plays" that elude easy categorisation, or perhaps purposely break generic conventions, and has introduced the term romances for what scholars believe to be his later comedies.

Curtain Theatre

CurtainThe CurtainThe Curtain Playhouse
When Shakespeare first arrived in London in the late 1570s or early 1580s, dramatists writing for London's new commercial playhouses (such as The Curtain) were combining two strands of dramatic tradition into a new and distinctively Elizabethan synthesis.

Tudor period

TudorTudor eraTudor England
Previously, the most common forms of popular English theatre were the Tudor morality plays.

Morality play

morality talemorality playsinterlude
Previously, the most common forms of popular English theatre were the Tudor morality plays.