Shaktism

ShaktaShaktiKalikulaDevisaktaSakthaShakta TantraShaktasŚāktaGoddess-centric
Shaktism (Sanskrit:, lit., "doctrine of energy, power, the Goddess") is a major tradition of Hinduism, wherein the metaphysical reality is considered metaphorically feminine and Adi Parashakti is supreme.wikipedia
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Adi Parashakti

Divine MotherMahashaktiAdhi para sakthi
Shaktism (Sanskrit:, lit., "doctrine of energy, power, the Goddess") is a major tradition of Hinduism, wherein the metaphysical reality is considered metaphorically feminine and Adi Parashakti is supreme.
Adi Parashakti is a goddess who is considered the Supreme Being in the Shaktism sect of Hinduism.

Parvati

UmaGauriGoddess Parvati
Shaktism has different sub-traditions, ranging from those focused on gracious Gauri to fierce Kali, and some Shakti sub-traditions associate their goddess with Shiva or Brahma or Vishnu. The most common aspects of Devi found in Shaktism include Durga, Kali, Amba, Saraswati, Lakshmi, Parvati and Tripurasundari.
Known by many other names, she is the gentle and nurturing aspect of the Supreme Hindu goddess Adi Parashakti and one of the central deities of the Goddess-oriented Shakta sect.

Shiva

SivaLord ShivaMahadev
Shaktism has different sub-traditions, ranging from those focused on gracious Gauri to fierce Kali, and some Shakti sub-traditions associate their goddess with Shiva or Brahma or Vishnu.
In the tradition of Hinduism called Shaktism, the Goddess, or Devi, is described as supreme, yet Shiva is revered along with Vishnu and Brahma.

Devi Mahatmya

Devi MahatmyamChandiDevi Mahatyam
In addition, it reveres the texts Devi Mahatmya, the Devi-Bhagavata Purana, and Shakta Upanishads such as the Devi Upanishad.
Along with Devi-Bhagavata Purana and Shakta Upanishads such as the Devi Upanishad, it is one of the most important texts of Shaktism (goddess) tradition within Hinduism.

Shakta Upanishads

Shakta
In addition, it reveres the texts Devi Mahatmya, the Devi-Bhagavata Purana, and Shakta Upanishads such as the Devi Upanishad. Other important texts of Shaktism include the Shakta Upanishads, as well as Shakta-oriented Upa Puranic literature such as the Devi Purana and Kalika Purana, the Lalita Sahasranama (from the Brahmanda Purana). The Tripura Upanishad is historically the most complete introduction to Shakta Tantrism, distilling into its 16 verses almost every important topic in Shakta Tantra tradition.
Shakta Upanishads are a group of minor Upanishads of Hinduism related to the Shaktism theology of a Goddess (Devi) as the Supreme Being.

Devi-Bhagavata Purana

Devi Bhagavata PuranaDevi BhagavatamDevi Bhagavata
In addition, it reveres the texts Devi Mahatmya, the Devi-Bhagavata Purana, and Shakta Upanishads such as the Devi Upanishad.
Along with Devi Mahatmya, it is one of the most important works in Shaktism, a tradition within Hinduism that reveres Devi or Shakti (Goddess) as the primordial creator of the universe and the Brahman (ultimate truth and reality).

Devi Upanishad

Devī
In addition, it reveres the texts Devi Mahatmya, the Devi-Bhagavata Purana, and Shakta Upanishads such as the Devi Upanishad.
It is one of the 19 Upanishads attached to the Atharvaveda, and is classified as one of the eight Shakta Upanishads.

Durga

AmbaGoddess DurgaKotravai
The most common aspects of Devi found in Shaktism include Durga, Kali, Amba, Saraswati, Lakshmi, Parvati and Tripurasundari.
She is a central deity in Shaktism tradition of Hinduism, where she is equated with the concept of ultimate reality called Brahman.

Tripura

Penchartal, TripuraTripura StateTripuri
The goddess-focussed tradition is particularly popular in West Bengal, Odisha, Assam, Tripura, Kumaon, Mithila (North Bihar) and Nepal and the neighboring regions, which it celebrates through festivals such as the Durga puja.
The Sanskrit name of the state is linked to the Hindu goddess of beauty; Tripura Sundari, the presiding deity of the Tripura Sundari Temple at Udaipur, one of the 51 Shakti Peethas (pilgrimage centres of Shaktism), and to the legendary tyrant king Tripur, who reigned in the region.

Lakshmi

MahalakshmiGoddess LakshmiSridevi
The most common aspects of Devi found in Shaktism include Durga, Kali, Amba, Saraswati, Lakshmi, Parvati and Tripurasundari.
Lakshmi is considered another aspect of the same supreme goddess principle in the Shaktism tradition of Hinduism.

Devi

goddessHindu goddessDevī
–Devi Sukta, Rigveda 10.125.3 – 10.125.8,
She has inspired the Shaktism tradition of Hinduism.

Shaivism

ShaiviteShaivaSaivite
Shaktism's ideas have influenced Vaishnavism and Shaivism traditions, with the goddess considered the Shakti of Vishnu and Shiva respectively, and revered prominently in numerous Hindu temples and festivals.
It is closely related to Shaktism, and some Shaiva worship in Shiva and Shakti temples.

Tripuratapini Upanishad

Tripurātapini
Along with the Tripura Upanishad, the Tripuratapini Upanishad has attracted scholarly bhasya (commentary) in the second half of 2nd-millennium, such as by Bhaskararaya, and by Ramanand.
It is classified as one of the eight Shakta Upanishads and attached to the Atharvaveda.

Kundalini yoga

laya yogaKundalinikuṇḍalinī
Sub-traditions of Shaktism include "Tantra", which refers to techniques, practices and ritual grammar involving mantra, yantra, nyasa, mudra and certain elements of traditional kundalini yoga, typically practiced under the guidance of a qualified guru after due initiation (diksha) and oral instruction to supplement various written sources.
Kundalini yoga is a school of yoga that is influenced by Shaktism and Tantra schools of Hinduism.

Kalika Purana

KalikaKālikā Purāṇa
Other important texts of Shaktism include the Shakta Upanishads, as well as Shakta-oriented Upa Puranic literature such as the Devi Purana and Kalika Purana, the Lalita Sahasranama (from the Brahmanda Purana). The Tripura Upanishad is historically the most complete introduction to Shakta Tantrism, distilling into its 16 verses almost every important topic in Shakta Tantra tradition.
The Kalika Purana (Kālikā Purāṇa), also called the Kali Purana, Sati Purana or Kalika Tantra, is one of the eighteen minor Puranas (Upapurana) in the Shaktism tradition of Hinduism.

Upanishads

upanishadUpanishadicUpaniṣad
Goddesses such as Uma appear in the Upanishads as another aspect of Brahman and the knower of ultimate knowledge, such as in section 3 and 4 of the ancient Kena Upanishad.
These are further divided into Upanishads associated with Shaktism (goddess Shakti), Sannyasa (renunciation, monastic life), Shaivism (god Shiva), Vaishnavism (god Vishnu), Yoga, and Sāmānya (general, sometimes referred to as Samanya-Vedanta).

Kali

KaaliKalikaGoddess Kali
Shaktism has different sub-traditions, ranging from those focused on gracious Gauri to fierce Kali, and some Shakti sub-traditions associate their goddess with Shiva or Brahma or Vishnu. The most common aspects of Devi found in Shaktism include Durga, Kali, Amba, Saraswati, Lakshmi, Parvati and Tripurasundari.
Kali is one of the ten Mahavidyas, a list which combines Sakta and Buddhist goddesses.

Sanskrit

Skt.classical SanskritSanskrit language
Shaktism (Sanskrit:, lit., "doctrine of energy, power, the Goddess") is a major tradition of Hinduism, wherein the metaphysical reality is considered metaphorically feminine and Adi Parashakti is supreme.

Kaula (Hinduism)

KaulakulaKulamārga
It consists of the Vidyapitha and Kulamārga.
Kaula, also known as Kula, ' ("the Kula practice") and ' ("the Kaula conduct"), is a religious tradition in Shaktism and tantric Shaivism characterised by distinctive rituals and symbolism connected with the worship of Shakti.

Lalita Sahasranama

LalitaLalitha SahasranamamShatakoti Archana
Other important texts of Shaktism include the Shakta Upanishads, as well as Shakta-oriented Upa Puranic literature such as the Devi Purana and Kalika Purana, the Lalita Sahasranama (from the Brahmanda Purana). The Tripura Upanishad is historically the most complete introduction to Shakta Tantrism, distilling into its 16 verses almost every important topic in Shakta Tantra tradition.
This sahasranama is held as a sacred text for the worship of the "Divine Mother", Lalita, and is used in the worship of Durga, Parvati, Kali, Lakshmi, Saraswati, Bhagavathi, etc. A principal text of Shakti worshipers, it names her various attributes, and these names are organized in the form of a hymn.

Vaishnavism

VaishnavaVaishnaviteVaishnavaite
Shaktism's ideas have influenced Vaishnavism and Shaivism traditions, with the goddess considered the Shakti of Vishnu and Shiva respectively, and revered prominently in numerous Hindu temples and festivals.
Vaishnavism (Vaishnava dharma) is one of the major traditions within Hinduism along with Shaivism, Shaktism, and Smarthism.

Brahmanda Purana

BrahmandaBrahmāņḍa Purāņathe cosmos
Other important texts of Shaktism include the Shakta Upanishads, as well as Shakta-oriented Upa Puranic literature such as the Devi Purana and Kalika Purana, the Lalita Sahasranama (from the Brahmanda Purana). The Tripura Upanishad is historically the most complete introduction to Shakta Tantrism, distilling into its 16 verses almost every important topic in Shakta Tantra tradition.
The text is also notable for the Adhyatma Ramayana, the most important embedded set of chapters in the text, which philosophically attempts to reconcile Bhakti in god Rama and Shaktism with Advaita Vedanta, over 65 chapters and 4,500 verses.

Bhaskararaya

Along with the Tripura Upanishad, the Tripuratapini Upanishad has attracted scholarly bhasya (commentary) in the second half of 2nd-millennium, such as by Bhaskararaya, and by Ramanand.
According to Douglas Renfrew Brooks, a professor of Religion specializing in Shaktism studies, Bhaskararaya was "not only a brilliant interpreter of Srividya, he was an encyclopedic writer", and that he was a "thinker who had the wealth of Tantric and Vedic traditions at his fingertips".

Agni

FireTejasAgni Deva
The Vedic literature reveres various goddesses, but far less frequently than gods Indra, Agni and Soma.
In the text Devi Mahatmya of the goddess tradition of Hinduism (Shaktism), and in the Hindu mythologies, Svaha is the daughter of goddess Daksha, Svaha has a crush for Agni.

Iṣṭa-devatā (Hinduism)

ishta-devataishtadevataIshta Devata
The primary Devi form worshiped by a Shakta devotee is his or her ishta-devi, that is a personally selected Devi.
For example, in Vaishnavism, special focus is given to a particular form of Lord Vishnu or one of his Avatars (i.e. Krishna or Rama), and similarly within Shaktism, focus is given to a particular form of the Goddess such as Parvati or Lakshmi.