Shibe Park

Connie Mack StadiumPhiladelphiaShibe Park/Connie Mack StadiumConnie Mack Stadium (Shibe Park)
Shibe Park, known later as Connie Mack Stadium, was a baseball park located in Philadelphia.wikipedia
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Philadelphia Phillies

PhilliesPhiladelphiaPHI
It was the home of the Philadelphia Athletics of the American League (AL) and the Philadelphia Phillies of the National League (NL).
The team has played at several stadiums in the city, beginning with Recreation Park and continuing at Baker Bowl; Shibe Park, which was later renamed Connie Mack Stadium in honor of the longtime Philadelphia Athletics manager; Veterans Stadium; and now Citizens Bank Park.

1952 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

19521952 All-Star GameAll-Star Game
The stadium hosted eight World Series and two MLB All-Star Games, in 1943 and 1952, with the latter game holding the distinction of being the only All-Star contest shortened by rain (to five innings).
The game was held on July 8, 1952, at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania the home of the Philadelphia Phillies of the National League.

Baseball park

ballparkbaseball stadiumpark
Shibe Park, known later as Connie Mack Stadium, was a baseball park located in Philadelphia.
From that point until the retro building boom of the 1990s, the suffix "Stadium" was used for almost every new major league ballpark, and was sometimes applied to the old ones, such as Shibe Park, which was renamed Connie Mack Stadium in 1954.

1943 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

19431943 All-Star GameAll-Star Game
The stadium hosted eight World Series and two MLB All-Star Games, in 1943 and 1952, with the latter game holding the distinction of being the only All-Star contest shortened by rain (to five innings).
The game was held on July 13, 1943, at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, the home of the Philadelphia Athletics of the American League.

Swampoodle, Philadelphia

Swampoodle
He searched for a site for his new park and found one on Lehigh Avenue between 20th and 21st Streets, five blocks west of Baker Bowl, straddling the neighborhoods known as Swampoodle and Goosetown.
The neighborhood was the home of the Connie Mack Stadium, previously called Shibe Park.

Columbia Park

In the early years of the 20th century, baseball was popular enough in Philadelphia that Philadelphia Athletics president Ben Shibe found his team regularly turning away customers from their cramped Columbia Park ballpark even though it was just a few years old.
Columbia Park fell into disuse after the Athletics' move in 1909 to the larger Shibe Park, and was demolished in the 1910s.

History of the Philadelphia Athletics

Philadelphia AthleticsPhiladelphiaAthletics
It was the home of the Philadelphia Athletics of the American League (AL) and the Philadelphia Phillies of the National League (NL).
In 1909, the A's moved into the major leagues' first concrete-and-steel ballpark, Shibe Park.

Baker Bowl

National League ParkBaker Bowl National League ParkHuntingdon Street Grounds
He searched for a site for his new park and found one on Lehigh Avenue between 20th and 21st Streets, five blocks west of Baker Bowl, straddling the neighborhoods known as Swampoodle and Goosetown. It was five blocks west, corner-to-corner, from the Baker Bowl, the Phillies' home from 1887 to 1938.
In 1936, a vandal sneaked into Baker Bowl one night and actually wrote that phrase on the Lifebuoy ad. Conventional wisdom ties their failures to Baker Bowl, but they remained cellar-dwellers in Shibe Park as well.

Night game

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They objected in general to the light, noise and traffic that night games would bring to the neighborhood, and objected specifically to the danger of home run balls hitting them as they sat on their porches and to the ability of fans in the upper decks to peer into their bedrooms at night.
The first night All-Star Game was held at Philadelphia's Shibe Park in 1943, while the first World Series night game was Game 4 of the 1971 Series at Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh.

Ben Shibe

JohnTomBenjamin F. Shibe
In the early years of the 20th century, baseball was popular enough in Philadelphia that Philadelphia Athletics president Ben Shibe found his team regularly turning away customers from their cramped Columbia Park ballpark even though it was just a few years old.
Shibe Park was named in his honor from 1909 to 1954.

Veterans Stadium

Philadelphia700 Level700 Level" of Veterans Stadium
The statue was later moved to Veterans Stadium in 1971, and ultimately to Citizens Bank Park in 2004.
The Phillies' then-home, Shibe Park, was starting to show its age (it had been built in 1909), had inadequate parking, and was located in a declining neighborhood.

Yankee Stadium (1923)

Yankee StadiumYankee Stadium (I)old Yankee Stadium
A prominent feature of the new board was the Ballantine Beer advertisement across the top and the Longines clock perched above it. The board's superficial resemblance to the similarly-adorned board in Yankee Stadium gave rise to the urban legend that the board was acquired second-hand from the Yankees.
Many sources incorrectly state that prior to the 1955 season, Yankee Stadium's Ballantine Beer scoreboard was sold to the Phillies for use in Shibe Park.

Commissioner of Baseball

Commissionerbaseball commissionerorganized baseball
In 1943 Nugent agreed in principle to sell the Phillies to Bill Veeck, only to have that sale derailed by Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis's objections to Veeck's plans to stock the Phillies with Negro League stars.
However, Flood refused to report to the moribund Phillies, citing the team's poor record and the fact that they played in dilapidated Connie Mack Stadium before belligerent and, Flood believed, racist fans.

Philadelphia Eagles

EaglesPhiladelphiaPHI
Then in May 1964, Jerry Wolman, who had just bought the Philadelphia Eagles in February, brought the stadium ownership back to town, paying $757,000 for it as part of a larger real estate deal.
In 1937, the Eagles moved to Shibe Park (renamed Connie Mack Stadium in 1954) and played their home games at the stadium through 1957, except for the 1941 season, which was played at Municipal Stadium, where they had played from 1936 to 1939.

Richie Ashburn

Rich Ashburn
Phillies Hall-of-Fame centerfielder and longtime broadcaster Richie Ashburn remembered Shibe Park: "It looked like a ballpark. It smelled like a ballpark. It had a feeling and a heartbeat, a personality that was all baseball."
The center-field entertainment area at the Phillies current stadium, Citizens Bank Park, was named "Ashburn Alley" in his honor after numerous fans urged the Phillies to name their new stadium after Ashburn (Ashburn's 47 seasons of service to the Phillies organization was second in length in Philadelphia baseball history only to Connie Mack, who was so honored by the renaming of Shibe Park in 1953).

1964 Philadelphia Phillies season

Philadelphia Phillies1964Phillies
In different eras it was home to "The $100,000 Infield", "The Whiz Kids", and "The 1964 Phold".
Gene Mauch managed the Phillies, who played their home games at Connie Mack Stadium.

Home Run Baker

Frank "Home Run" BakerFrank BakerBaker
He would also call for players from decades earlier to pinch-hit; in the 1940s it was not uncommon for him to yell "Baker!"
He hit .305 with a .447 slugging percentage and four home runs for Philadelphia in 1909, including the first home run to go over the fence in right field of Shibe Park.

Connie Mack

ConnieCornelius McGillicuddyMackmen
When as many as 28,000 showed up to fill the 9,500 wooden bleacher seats, Shibe and partner Connie Mack decided the A's needed a new place to play.
The Philadelphia stadium, originally called Shibe Park, was renamed Connie Mack Stadium in 1953.

R. R. M. Carpenter Jr.

Bob CarpenterBob Carpenter, Jr.Bob, Jr.
Cox then sold the Phillies to DuPont vice president R. R. M. Carpenter, who gave the club presidency to his son, Bob, Jr. – a wealthy 28-year-old Delawarean whose mother was a DuPont and who himself was part-owner with Connie Mack of the Wilmington Blue Rocks minor league team.
Meanwhile, Carpenter and the Phillies bought Shibe Park (renamed "Connie Mack Stadium") from the A's, solidified their hold on Delaware Valley baseball fans, and moved into Veterans Stadium in.

Citizens Bank Park

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The statue was later moved to Veterans Stadium in 1971, and ultimately to Citizens Bank Park in 2004.
Ashburn Alley is named for the slightly-overgrown grass which bordered the third base line at Shibe Park where Ashburn was famous for laying down bunts that stayed fair.

Jerry Wolman

Then in May 1964, Jerry Wolman, who had just bought the Philadelphia Eagles in February, brought the stadium ownership back to town, paying $757,000 for it as part of a larger real estate deal.
He was also the owner of Connie Mack Stadium.

Arnold Johnson (industrialist)

Arnold JohnsonagreementArnold M. Johnson
In early August, Chicago businessman Arnold Johnson stepped forward with a complicated $3.375 million plan to buy the Athletics and move them to Kansas City.
They had played at Shibe Park as tenants of the A's since.

Doc Powers

Mike "Doc" Powers
In the very first game at Shibe Park, catcher Doc Powers of the Philadelphia Athletics is said by some to have suffered internal injuries after crashing into a wall to catch a foul pop-up.
On April 12, 1909, Powers was injured during the first game played in Philadelphia's Shibe Park, crashing into a wall while chasing a foul pop-up.

1950 World Series

1950World Series1950 Series
The Phillies participated in one World Series during their tenure at the stadium, in 1950.
In what would be the last postseason game ever played in Shibe Park, 20-game winner Robin Roberts and Allie Reynolds both pitched outstanding baseball for nine innings, as strong pitching and stout defense again prevailed in the Series.

Granny Hamner

Hamner, Granny
Phillies pitcher Curt Simmons started the game for the Nationals in front of the home crowd; Phillies shortstop Granny Hamner started and batted eighth; and A's pitcher Bobby Shantz pitched the fifth inning for the Americans and struck out Whitey Lockman, Jackie Robinson and Stan Musial in succession.
An All-Star three years in a row, Hamner was the National League's starting shortstop in the 1952 All-Star Game, played on his home field, Shibe Park, in Philadelphia.