Shin'yō-class suicide motorboat

Shinyosuicide boatShin'yōShinyo (suicide boat)suicide boatsboatsJapanese suicide boatsMaru-NiShin'yo GroupShin'yō
The Shinyo were Japanese suicide motorboats developed during World War II. They were part of the wider Japanese Special Attack Units program.wikipedia
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Japanese Special Attack Units

Special Attack Units4th Special Attack DivisionCrouching Dragon
They were part of the wider Japanese Special Attack Units program.
They included kamikaze aircraft, fukuryu frogmen, and several types of suicide boats and submarines.

Kamikaze

kamikazessuicide planesuicide planes
For the naval department this meant kamikaze planes, kaiten submarines, fukuryu suicide divers or human mines, and shinyo suicide boats.
The Japanese military also used or made plans for non-aerial Japanese Special Attack Units, including those involving submarines, human torpedoes, speedboats and divers.

Kaiten

Deploymenthuman torpedoesKaiten Type 1
For the naval department this meant kamikaze planes, kaiten submarines, fukuryu suicide divers or human mines, and shinyo suicide boats.
For the Navy, this meant Kamikaze planes, Shinyo suicide boats, Kaiten submarines, and Fukuryu suicide divers or human mines.

Operation Downfall

invasion of JapanOperation OlympicAllied invasion
Around 400 boats were transported to Okinawa and Formosa, and the rest were stored on the coast of Japan for the ultimate defense against the expected invasion of the Home islands.
In addition, Japan had about 100 Kōryū-class midget submarines, 300 smaller Kairyū-class midget submarines, 120 Kaiten manned torpedoes, and 2,412 Shin'yō suicide boats.

USS War Hawk

USS ''War Hawk'' (AP-168)USS ''War HawkUSS War Hawk (AP-168)
At 04:10 hours on the morning of 10 January 1945, War Hawk was anchored in Lingayen Gulf where she was attacked in the dark by a "Shinyo" suicide boat.

Suicide attack

suicide bombingsuicide bombersuicide bombers
The Shinyo were Japanese suicide motorboats developed during World War II.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
The Shinyo were Japanese suicide motorboats developed during World War II.

Empire of Japan

JapaneseJapanImperial Japan
Towards the end of 1943, in response to unfavorable progress in the war, the Japanese command heard suggestions for various suicide craft.

Fukuryu

suicide swimmersdivers
For the naval department this meant kamikaze planes, kaiten submarines, fukuryu suicide divers or human mines, and shinyo suicide boats.

Knot (unit)

knotsknotkn
These fast motorboats were driven by one man, to speeds of around 30 knots.

Explosive

explosiveshigh explosiveHE
They were typically equipped with a bow-mounted charge of up to 300 kg of explosives that could be detonated by either impact or from a manual switch in the driver's area.

Imperial Japanese Army

Japanese ArmyJapanese Imperial ArmyJapanese
The similar Maru-ni, which were used by the Imperial Japanese Army, were equipped with two depth charges, and were not actually suicide boats, as the idea was to drop the depth charges and then turn around before the explosion took place. 6,197 Shinyo boats were produced for the Imperial Japanese Navy and 3,000 Maru-ni for the Imperial Japanese Army.

Depth charge

depth chargesY-gunK-gun
The similar Maru-ni, which were used by the Imperial Japanese Army, were equipped with two depth charges, and were not actually suicide boats, as the idea was to drop the depth charges and then turn around before the explosion took place.

Imperial Japanese Navy

JapaneseJapanese NavyJapanese Imperial Navy
6,197 Shinyo boats were produced for the Imperial Japanese Navy and 3,000 Maru-ni for the Imperial Japanese Army.

Okinawa Prefecture

OkinawaOkinawanOkinawa, Japan
Around 400 boats were transported to Okinawa and Formosa, and the rest were stored on the coast of Japan for the ultimate defense against the expected invasion of the Home islands.

Taiwan

Republic of ChinaFormosaRepublic of China (Taiwan)
Around 400 boats were transported to Okinawa and Formosa, and the rest were stored on the coast of Japan for the ultimate defense against the expected invasion of the Home islands.

Philippines campaign (1944–1945)

Philippines campaignPhilippines Campaign (1944–45)Philippines
The main operative use took place during the Philippines Campaign of 1944–45.

Mariveles, Bataan

MarivelesMariveles BayMariveles Field