Shinto

ShintoismShintōShintoistShinto religionShinto priestShinto weddingsShinto-derivedShintoistsethnic religiousFolk Shinto
Shinto, also known as Shintoism or kami-no-michi, is a religion originating from Japan.wikipedia
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Kami

godsgoddeity
Shinto is polytheistic and revolves around the kami ("gods" or "spirits"), supernatural entities believed to inhabit all things.
Kami are the spirits, phenomena or "holy powers" that are venerated in the religion of Shinto.

Shinto shrine

shrineShinto shrinesshrines
The kami are worshipped at kamidana household shrines, family shrines, and public shrines.
Although only one word ("shrine") is used in English, in Japanese, Shinto shrines may carry any one of many different, non-equivalent names like gongen, -gū, jinja, jingū, mori, myōjin, -sha, taisha, ubusuna, or yashiro.

Kagura

kagura dancekagura ritual dancekagura-den
Other common rituals include the kagura ritual dances, age specific celebrations, and seasonal festivals.
Kagura is a specific type of Shinto ritual ceremonial dance.

Kamidana

family shrinehousehold Shinto altars
The kami are worshipped at kamidana household shrines, family shrines, and public shrines.
Kamidana are miniature household altars provided to enshrine a Shinto kami.

State Shinto

State ShintoismShintoShintoist Rites Research Council
During the Meiji era (1868 to 1912 CE), Japan's leadership expelled Buddhist influence from Shinto and formed State Shinto, which they utilized as a method for fomenting nationalism and imperial worship.
State Shintō (国家神道 or 國家神道) describes Imperial Japan's ideological use of the native folk traditions of Shinto.

Kojiki

Kōjikiancient Japanese mythKojiki-den
The earliest written tradition regarding kami worship was recorded in the eighth-century Kojiki and Nihon Shoki.
Later, the myths were re-appropriated for Shinto practices such as the misogi purification ritual.

Emperor of Japan

EmperorMonarchJapanese Emperor
Shrines came under growing government influence, and the Emperor of Japan was elevated to a particularly high position as a kami.
Historically, he is also the highest authority of the Shinto religion.

Polytheism

polytheisticpolytheistspolytheist
Shinto is polytheistic and revolves around the kami ("gods" or "spirits"), supernatural entities believed to inhabit all things.
Important polytheistic religions practiced today include Taoism, Shenism, Hinduism, Japanese Shinto, Santeria, and various neopagan faiths.

East Asian religions

Taoic religionsEast AsianEast Asian Religion
Classified as an East Asian religion by scholars of religion, its practitioners often regard it as Japan's indigenous religion.
The group also includes Japanese Shintoism and Korean Sindoism (both meaning "Ways of Gods" and identifying the indigenous shamanic religion and ancestor worship of such peoples), which have received influences from Chinese religions throughout the centuries.

Toshio Kuroda

Kuroda Toshio
The scholar of religion Brian Bocking stressed that the term should "be approached with caution", particularly when it was applied to periods before the Meiji era, Inoue Nobutaka stated that "Shinto cannot be considered as a single religious system that existed from the ancient to the modern period", while the historian Kuroda Toshio noted that "before modern times Shinto did not exist as an independent religion".
Kuroda is known for having published "Shinto in the History of Japanese Religion," which argued that Shinto as an independent religion took shape only in the modern period, having emerged in the medieval age as an offshoot of Buddhism.

Japanese mythology

JapanesemythologyJapanese folklore
According to Japanese mythology, there are eight million kami.
Japanese mythology embraces Shinto and Buddhist traditions as well as agriculturally-based folk religion.

Buddhism in Japan

Japanese BuddhismBuddhistJapanese Buddhist
In medieval Japan, kami-worship was generally seen as being part of Japanese Buddhism, with the kami themselves often being interpreted as Buddhas.
However, in terms of practice, 75% practice some form of Buddhism (compared with 90% practicing Shinto, thus most Japanese practice both religions to some extent (Shinbutsu-shūgō)).

Hachiman

Hachiman (Bosatsu)Hachiman DaimyōjinHachiman-daibosatsu
One of the most prominent examples is that of the Emperor Ōjin, who on his death was enshrined as the kami Hachiman, believed to be a protector of Japan and a god of war.
In Japanese beliefs, Hachiman is the syncretic divinity of archery and war, incorporating elements from both Shinto and Buddhism.

Tengu

DaitenguCrow TenguKarasu-tengu
Bakemono include oni, tengu, kappa, mononoke, and yamanba.
They are considered a type of yōkai (supernatural beings) or Shinto kami (gods).

Kanjō

Kanjobrought hereinvited
As part of this, the kami is invited to enter a new place, where it can be venerated, with the instalment ceremony being known as a kanjo.
Kanjō in Shinto terminology indicates a propagation process through which a kami, previously divided through a process called bunrei, is invited to another location and there re-enshrined.

Meiji (era)

Meiji periodMeiji eraMeiji
During the Meiji era (1868 to 1912 CE), Japan's leadership expelled Buddhist influence from Shinto and formed State Shinto, which they utilized as a method for fomenting nationalism and imperial worship.
In as much as the Meiji Restoration had sought to return the Emperor to a preeminent position, efforts were made to establish a Shinto-oriented state much like it was 1,000 years earlier.

Amaterasu

Amaterasu OmikamiAmaterasu-ŌmikamiAmaterasu Ōmikami
Through this act, further kami emerged from his body: Amaterasu (the sun kami) was born from his left eye, Tsukiyomi (the moon kami) from his right eye, and Susanoo (the storm kami) from his nose.
Amaterasu, Amaterasu-ōmikami, or Ōhirume-no-muchi-no-kami is a deity of the Japanese myth cycle and also a major deity of the Shinto religion.

Susanoo-no-Mikoto

SusanooSusano-oSusano'o
Through this act, further kami emerged from his body: Amaterasu (the sun kami) was born from his left eye, Tsukiyomi (the moon kami) from his right eye, and Susanoo (the storm kami) from his nose.
Susanoo, recorded in the Kojiki as Takehaya Susano'o no Mikoto, in the Nihon Shoki as Susano'o no Mikoto, and at Kumano shrine as Kumano Ketsumiko no kami, is the Shinto god of the sea and storms.

Jinushigami

jigami
In Western Japan, the term jigami is used to describe the enshrined kami of a village founder.
Jinushigami, also known as jigami, tochigami, chi no kami, or jinushisama, are Shinto folk deities, or kami, of an area of land (the name literally means "land-master-kami").

Kegare

considered uncleancontaminatedimpurity
A key theme in Shinto thought is the importance of avoiding kegare ("pollution" or "impurity"), while ensuring harae ("purity").
uncleanness, defilement is the Japanese term for a state of pollution and defilement, important particularly in Shinto as a religious term.

Tsukuyomi-no-Mikoto

TsukuyomiTsukiyomiJapanese God of the Moon
Through this act, further kami emerged from his body: Amaterasu (the sun kami) was born from his left eye, Tsukiyomi (the moon kami) from his right eye, and Susanoo (the storm kami) from his nose.
Tsukuyomi-no-Mikoto or Tsukuyomi, is the moon god in Shinto and Japanese mythology.

Onogoro Island

OnogoroshimaOnogoroOnogoro-shima
To this end, the siblings stirred the briny sea with a jewelled spear, from which Onogoro Island was formed.
Onogoroshima is an important island in Shinto.

Amenominakanushi

Amenominakanushi-no-KamiGod Amenominaka
Three kami then appeared: Amenominakanushi, Takamimusuhi no Mikoto, and Kamimusuhi no Mikoto.
Amenominakanushi (天御中主 or 天之御中主神) is, according to the Kojiki, the first kami and the source of the universe according to Shinto.

Indigenous religion

indigenous religionsindigenousIndigenous beliefs
Classified as an East Asian religion by scholars of religion, its practitioners often regard it as Japan's indigenous religion.
For instance, the Japanese religion of Shinto is often referred to as an "indigenous religion" although, because the Japanese are not a colonised society but have colonised neighbouring societies like that of the Ainu, there is debate as to whether they meet the definition of "indigenous".

Izanagi

Izanagi-no-MikotoIzanagi no MikotoNagi
Other kami followed, including a brother and sister, Izanagi and Izanami.
Izanagi is a deity born of the seven divine generations in Japanese mythology and Shinto, and his name in the Kojiki is roughly translated to as "he-who-invites".