Shiva

Lord ShivaSivaLord SivaMahadevMahadevaShivŚivaSivanMaheshvaraMallikarjuna
Shiva (Sanskrit: शिव, lit. the auspicious one) also known as Mahadeva (lit. the great god) is one of the principal deities of Hinduism.wikipedia
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Shaktism

ShaktaSaktaSaktism
In the Shaktism tradition, the Goddess, or Devi, is described as one of the supreme, yet Shiva is revered along with Vishnu and Brahma.
Shaktism has different sub-traditions, ranging from those focused on gracious Gauri to fierce Kali, and some Shakti sub-traditions associate their Goddess with Shiva or Brahma or Vishnu.

Parvati

ParvathiUmaGoddess Parvati
A goddess is stated to be the energy and creative power (Shakti) of each, with Parvati (Sati) the equal complementary partner of Shiva. In benevolent aspects, he is depicted as an omniscient Yogi who lives an ascetic life on Mount Kailash as well as a householder with wife Parvati and his two children, Ganesha and Kartikeya.
Parvati is the wife of the Hindu god Shiva – the protector, the destroyer (pure evil) and regenerator of the universe and all life.

Hindu deities

Hindu godHindu godsHindu deity
the great god) is one of the principal deities of Hinduism.
Illustrations of major deities include Parvati, Vishnu, Sri (Lakshmi), Shiva, Sati, Brahma and Saraswati.

Sati (Hindu goddess)

SatiDakshayaniSati Devi
A goddess is stated to be the energy and creative power (Shakti) of each, with Parvati (Sati) the equal complementary partner of Shiva.
An aspect of Adi Parashakti, Dakshayani is the first consort of Shiva, the second being Parvati who is the reincarnation of Sati.

Trimurti

Hindu TrinityTrimurthiTrinity
Shiva is known as "The Destroyer" within the Trimurti, the Hindu trinity that includes Brahma and Vishnu.
The Trimūrti (Sanskrit: त्रिमूर्ति, "three forms") is the Triple deity of supreme divinity in Hinduism in which the cosmic functions of creation, maintenance, and destruction are personified as a triad of deities, typically Brahma the creator, Vishnu the preserver, and Shiva the destroyer, though individual denominations may vary from that particular line-up.

Ishvara

IsvaraIshwaraIswara
According to the Shaivism sect, the highest form of Ishvar is formless, limitless, transcendent and unchanging absolute Brahman, and the primal Atman (soul, self) of the universe.
In Shaivism and for many Hindus, Ishvara is synonymous with "Shiva", sometimes as Maheshvara or Parameshvara meaning the "Supreme lord", or as an Ishta-deva (personal god).

Ganesha

GaneshVinayakaLord Ganesha
In benevolent aspects, he is depicted as an omniscient Yogi who lives an ascetic life on Mount Kailash as well as a householder with wife Parvati and his two children, Ganesha and Kartikeya.
Hindu mythology identifies him as the restored son of Parvati and Shiva of the Shaivism tradition, but he is a pan-Hindu god found in its various traditions.

Devi

Hindu goddessgoddessDevī
In the Shaktism tradition, the Goddess, or Devi, is described as one of the supreme, yet Shiva is revered along with Vishnu and Brahma.
In other Hindu traditions, Devi embodies the active energy and power of Deva, and they always appear together complementing each other, such as Parvati with Shiva in Shaivism, Saraswati with Brahma in Brahmanism, and Lakshmi with Vishnu in Vaishnavism.

Nayanars

NayanarNayanmarsNayanmar
Tamil literature is enriched by Shiva devotees called 63 Nayanmars (Nayanars).
Nayanars, Tamil: நாயன்மார்கள், lit. "hounds of Siva", later "teachers of Siva") were a group of 63 saints (also saint poets) in the 6th to 8th century who were devoted to the Hindu god Shiva in Tamil Nadu.

Ganges

GangaGanges RiverGanga River
The iconographical attributes of Shiva are the serpent around his neck, the adorning crescent moon, the holy river Ganga flowing from his matted hair, the third eye on his forehead, the trishula or trident, as his weapon, and the damaru drum.
The Bhagirathi rises at the foot of Gangotri Glacier, at Gomukh, at an elevation of 3892 m, being mythologically referred to as, residing in the matted locks of Shiva, symbolically Tapovan, being a meadow of ethereal beauty at the feet of Mount Shivling, just 5 km away.

Pancha Bhoota Stalam

Pancha Bhoota StalaPanchabhoota Sthalams
Pancha Bhoota Stalam refers to five temples dedicated to Shiva.
Pancha Bhoota Sthalam refers to five temples dedicated to Shiva, each representing a manifestation of the five prime elements of nature: earth, water, fire, air, and space.

Brahma

Lord BrahmaBrahmāBramha
Shiva is known as "The Destroyer" within the Trimurti, the Hindu trinity that includes Brahma and Vishnu.
According to some, Brahma does not enjoy popular worship in present-age Hinduism and has lesser importance than the other members of the Trimurti, Vishnu and Shiva.

Yoga

yogicyogiYog
Shiva is also known as Adiyogi Shiva, regarded as the patron god of yoga, meditation and arts.
In various Shaiva and Shakta traditions of yoga and tantra, yogic techniques or yuktis are used to unite kundalini-shakti, the divine conscious force or energy, with Shiva, universal consciousness.

Panchayatana puja

PanchayatanapanchadevaPanchadeval Binayak Municipality
He is one of the five equivalent deities in Panchayatana puja of the Smarta tradition of Hinduism.
It consists of the worship of five deities set in a quincunx pattern, the five deities being Shiva, Vishnu, Devi or Parvati, Surya and an Ishta Devata such as Kartikeya or Ganesha or any personal god of devotee's preference.

Yogi

yogisyogingreat yogi
In benevolent aspects, he is depicted as an omniscient Yogi who lives an ascetic life on Mount Kailash as well as a householder with wife Parvati and his two children, Ganesha and Kartikeya.
In Hindu mythology, god Shiva and goddess Parvati are depicted as an emblematic yogi–yogini pair.

Hinduism

HinduHindusHindu culture
the great god) is one of the principal deities of Hinduism.
They worship the Supreme Being variously as Vishnu, Brahma, Shiva, or Shakti, depending upon the sect.

Nataraja

NatarajLord NatarajaNatarajan
Rock paintings from Bhimbetka, depicting a figure with a trishul, have been described as Nataraja by Erwin Neumayer, who dates them to the mesolithic.
Nataraja is a depiction of the Hindu god Shiva as the cosmic ecstatic dancer.

Vishnu

Lord VishnuViṣṇuVisnu
Shiva is known as "The Destroyer" within the Trimurti, the Hindu trinity that includes Brahma and Vishnu.
In contrast, the Shiva-focussed Puranas describe Brahma and Vishnu to have been created by Ardhanarishvara, that is half Shiva and half Parvati; or alternatively, Brahma was born from Rudra, or Vishnu, Shiva and Brahma creating each other cyclically in different aeons (kalpa).

Parameshwara (God)

ParameshwaraParameshvaraParamashiva
The highest reverence for Shiva in Shaivism is reflected in his epithets ' ("Great god"; ' "Great" and deva "god"), ' ("Great Lord"; ' "great" and "lord"), and [[Parameshwara (God)|]] ("Supreme Lord").
Paraméshwara (IAST: Parameśvara, Sanskrit: परमेश्वर) or Paramashiva is the term usually referred to the Hindu god Shiva as the Supreme being according to Saivism which is one of 4 major sampradaya of Hinduism.

Damaru

DamruChöd drumderoos
The iconographical attributes of Shiva are the serpent around his neck, the adorning crescent moon, the holy river Ganga flowing from his matted hair, the third eye on his forehead, the trishula or trident, as his weapon, and the damaru drum.
In Hinduism, the damru is known as the instrument of the deity Shiva, and is said to be created by Shiva to produce spiritual sounds by which the whole universe has been created and regulated.

Mount Kailash

KailashKailasaKailas
In benevolent aspects, he is depicted as an omniscient Yogi who lives an ascetic life on Mount Kailash as well as a householder with wife Parvati and his two children, Ganesha and Kartikeya.
In Hinduism, it is traditionally recognized as the abode of Lord Shiva, who resided there along with his consort goddess Parvati and their children, lord Ganesh and lord Kartikeya.

Rudra

KidlatLord RudraRudrá
The word Shiva is used as an adjective in the Rig Veda (approximately 1700–1100 BC), as an epithet for several Rigvedic deities, including Rudra.
The Hindu god Shiva shares several features with the Rudra: the theonym Shiva originated as an epithet of Rudra, the adjective shiva ("kind") being used euphemistically of Rudra, who also carries the epithet Aghora, Abhayankar ("extremely calm [sic] non terrifying").

Tamil language

TamilTamil-languageta
Some authors associate the name with the Tamil word ' meaning "red", noting that Shiva is linked to the Sun (', "the Red one", in Tamil) and that Rudra is also called Babhru (brown, or red) in the Rigveda.
According to Hindu legend, Tamil or in personification form Tamil Thāi (Mother Tamil) was created by Lord Shiva.

Stotra

StotrasStotramstrota
There are at least eight different versions of the Shiva Sahasranama, devotional hymns (stotras) listing many names of Shiva.
Many stotra hymns praise aspects of the divine, such as Devi, Shiva, or Vishnu.

Rudras

Rudrathe eleven Rudras
In RV 2.33, he is described as the "Father of the Rudras", a group of storm gods.
Rudras are forms and followers of the god Rudra-Shiva and make eleven of the Thirty-three gods in the Hindu pantheon.