The opening page of the 1828 Yiddish-written Jewish Holiday of Purim play Esther, oder die belohnte Tugend from Fürth (by Nürnberg), Bavaria
Sholem Aleichem, 1907
The calligraphic segment in the Worms Machzor. The Yiddish text is in red.
Sholem Aleichem statue in Netanya, Israel
A page from the Shemot Devarim, a Yiddish–Hebrew–Latin–German dictionary and thesaurus, published by Elia Levita in 1542
Monument to Sholem Aleichem in Bohuslav, Ukraine
American World War I-era poster in Yiddish. Translated caption: "Food will win the war – You came here seeking freedom, now you must help to preserve it – We must supply the Allies with wheat – Let nothing go to waste". Colour lithograph, 1917. Digitally restored.
Sholem Aleichem
1917. 100 karbovanets of the Ukrainian People's Republic. Revers. Three languages: Ukrainian, Polish and Yiddish.
A volume of Sholem Aleichem stories in Yiddish, with the author's portrait and signature
Map of the Yiddish dialects between the 15th and the 19th centuries (Western dialects in orange / Eastern dialects in green)
Sholem Aleichem's funeral on May 15, 1916
An example of graffiti in Yiddish, Tel Aviv, Washington Avenue (און איר זאלט ליב האבן דעם פרעמדען, ווארום פרעמדע זייט איר געווען אין לאנד מצרים Un ir zolt lib hobn dem fremdn varum fremde seit ir geven in land mitsrayim). "You shall have love for the stranger, because you were strangers in the land of Egypt." (Deuteronomy 10:19)
A 1959 Soviet Union postage stamp commemorating the centennial of Sholem Aleichem's birth
NEP-era Soviet Yiddish poster "Come to us at the Kolkhoz!"
Israeli postal stamp, 1959
State emblem of the Byelorussian SSR with the motto Workers of the world, unite! in Yiddish (lower left part of the ribbon): ״פראָלעטאריער פון אלע לענדער, פאראייניקט זיך!״, Proletarier fun ale lender, fareynikt zikh! The same slogan is written in Belarusian, Russian and Polish.
Museum of Sholem Aleichem in Pereiaslav
The Jewish Autonomous Oblast in Russia
Portrait bust of Sholem Aleichem (1859-1916) sculpted by Mitchell Fields
Banner from the first issue of the Yidishe Folksshtime ("Yiddish People's Voice"), published in Stockholm, January 12, 1917
1917 multilingual poster in Yiddish, English, Italian, Hungarian, Slovene, and Polish, advertising English classes for new immigrants in Cleveland
Women surrounded by posters in English and Yiddish supporting Franklin D. Roosevelt, Herbert H. Lehman, and the American Labor Party teach other women how to vote, 1936.
A typical poster-hung wall in Jewish Brooklyn, New York
A road sign in Yiddish (except for the word "sidewalk") at an official construction site in the Monsey hamlet, a community with thousands of Yiddish speakers, in Ramapo, New York.

Solomon Naumovich Rabinovich, better known under his pen name Sholem Aleichem (Yiddish and שלום עליכם, also spelled in Soviet Yiddish, ; Russian and Шо́лом-Але́йхем) (March 2 1859May 13, 1916), was a Yiddish author and playwright.

- Sholem Aleichem

Notable Yiddish writers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries are Sholem Yankev Abramovitch, writing as Mendele Mocher Sforim; Sholem Rabinovitsh, widely known as Sholem Aleichem, whose stories about טבֿיה דער מילכיקער (Tevye der milkhiker, "Tevye the Dairyman") inspired the Broadway musical and film Fiddler on the Roof; and Isaac Leib Peretz.

- Yiddish
The opening page of the 1828 Yiddish-written Jewish Holiday of Purim play Esther, oder die belohnte Tugend from Fürth (by Nürnberg), Bavaria

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Actor portraying Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof

Tevye

Actor portraying Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof
Poster in Vilnius (Vilna) for a stage version of Tevye.

Tevye the Dairyman, also translated as Tevye the Milkman (טבֿיה דער מילכיקער, Tevye der milkhiker ) is the fictional narrator and protagonist of a series of short stories by Sholem Aleichem, and various adaptations of them, the most famous being the 1964 stage musical Fiddler on the Roof and its 1971 film adaptation.

The stories were written in Yiddish and first published in 1894; they have been published as Tevye and His Daughters, Tevye's Daughters, Tevye the Milkman, and Tevye the Dairyman.

Playbill from the original Broadway production

Fiddler on the Roof

Musical with music by Jerry Bock, lyrics by Sheldon Harnick, and book by Joseph Stein, set in the Pale of Settlement of Imperial Russia in or around 1905.

Musical with music by Jerry Bock, lyrics by Sheldon Harnick, and book by Joseph Stein, set in the Pale of Settlement of Imperial Russia in or around 1905.

Playbill from the original Broadway production
The Fiddler by Marc Chagall, c. 1912
Fiddler On the Roof by Lev Segal in Netanya, Israel
Zero Mostel as Tevye in the original Broadway production, 1964
2006 production at the Brno City Theatre in the Czech Republic
Statue of Tevye, his horse, wagon, and passenger in Birobidzhan, Russia

It is based on Tevye and his Daughters (or Tevye the Dairyman) and other tales by Sholem Aleichem.

Fiddler on the Roof is based on Tevye (or Tevye the Dairyman) and his Daughters, a series of stories by Sholem Aleichem that he wrote in Yiddish between 1894 and 1914 about Jewish life in a village in the Pale of Settlement of Imperial Russia at the turn of the 20th century.

Traditional orthography

Yiddish orthography

Traditional orthography
Soviet orthography
Transliteration in Yiddish alphabet of English text on bus stop signs in Kiryas Joel, New York. This is completely unpointed; for example stop is written rather than

Yiddish orthography is the writing system used for the Yiddish language.

The changes are both illustrated in the way the name of the author Sholem Aleichem is written.

From right to left, Hersch Dovid Nomberg, Chaim Zhitlovsky, Scholem Asch, Isaac Leib Peretz, Abraham Reisen during the Czernowitz-Conference; widely publicized post card.

Yiddishist movement

From right to left, Hersch Dovid Nomberg, Chaim Zhitlovsky, Scholem Asch, Isaac Leib Peretz, Abraham Reisen during the Czernowitz-Conference; widely publicized post card.
Yiddish translation of Das Kapital, translated by Doctor Jacob Abraham Maryson, published by Maryson's publishing company, the Kropotkin Literatur Gezelshaft, New York, 1917.

Yiddishism (Yiddish: ײִדישיזם) is a cultural and linguistic movement which began among Jews in Eastern Europe during the latter part of the 19th century.

Some of the leading founders of this movement were Mendele Moykher-Sforim (1836–1917), I. L. Peretz (1852–1915), and Sholem Aleichem (1859–1916).

Peretz, depicted on an old Yiddish-language postcard

I. L. Peretz

Peretz, depicted on an old Yiddish-language postcard
Left to right, Sholem Aleichem, Peretz, and Jacob Dinezon
Dinezon and Peretz

Isaac Leib Peretz (Icchok Lejbusz Perec, יצחק־לייבוש פרץ) (May 18, 1852 – April 3, 1915), also sometimes written Yitskhok Leybush Peretz was a Yiddish language author and playwright from Poland.

Payson R. Stevens, Charles M. Levine, and Sol Steinmetz count him with Mendele Mokher Seforim and Sholem Aleichem as one of the three great classical Yiddish writers.

Sholem Aleichem College

Independent Jewish co-educational early learning and primary day school located in the Melbourne suburb of Elsternwick, Victoria, Australia.

Independent Jewish co-educational early learning and primary day school located in the Melbourne suburb of Elsternwick, Victoria, Australia.

Established in 1947 by the Bundist movement as a Sunday school that taught Yiddish and Jewish studies, the current day school opened its doors to ten Prep children in 1975.

Sholem Aleichem (pen-name) is the namesake of the school.