Shopping cart

shopping trolleyshopping cartsshopping trolleysbuggiesbuggycartGrocery Cartshandles of supermarket trolleysother namesshopping cart handles
A shopping cart (American English) or trolley (British English), also known by a variety of other names, is a cart supplied by a shop, especially supermarkets, for use by customers inside the shop for transport of merchandise to the checkout counter during shopping.wikipedia
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Cart

cartshandcarttrolley
A shopping cart (American English) or trolley (British English), also known by a variety of other names, is a cart supplied by a shop, especially supermarkets, for use by customers inside the shop for transport of merchandise to the checkout counter during shopping.
Over time, the term "cart" has come to mean nearly any small conveyance, from shopping carts to golf carts or UTVs, without regard to number of wheels, load carried, or means of propulsion.

Supermarket

supermarketssupermarket chainGrocery Store
A shopping cart (American English) or trolley (British English), also known by a variety of other names, is a cart supplied by a shop, especially supermarkets, for use by customers inside the shop for transport of merchandise to the checkout counter during shopping.
Self-service with shopping carts (trolleys) or baskets reduces labor cost, and many supermarket chains are attempting further reduction by shifting to self-service check-out.

Sylvan Goldman

One of the first shopping carts was introduced on June 4, 1937, the invention of Sylvan Goldman, owner of the Humpty Dumpty supermarket chain in Oklahoma.
Sylvan Nathan Goldman (November 15, 1898 – November 25, 1984) was an American businessman and inventor of the shopping cart, which had a pair of large wire baskets connected by tubular metal arms with four wheels.

Orla Watson

Another shopping cart innovator was Orla Watson, who invented the swinging rear door to allow for "nesting" in 1946.
He is most remembered for his invention of the rear swinging door feature on grocery shopping carts allowing the cart to telescope, or "nest" in order to save space.

American English

EnglishAmericanEnglish-language
A shopping cart (American English) or trolley (British English), also known by a variety of other names, is a cart supplied by a shop, especially supermarkets, for use by customers inside the shop for transport of merchandise to the checkout counter during shopping.
The study found that most Americans prefer the term sub for a long sandwich, soda (but pop in the Great Lakes region and generic coke in the South) for a sweet and bubbly soft drink, you or you guys for the plural of you (but y'all in the South), sneakers for athletic shoes (but often tennis shoes outside the Northeast), and shopping cart for a cart used for carrying supermarket goods.

Grocery store

grocergrocerygroceries
Goldman continued to make modifications to his original design, but advice from his trusted business partners Fred Taylor, a grocery store owner, and George O'Donnell, a grocery store refrigeration salesman, and the incorporation of Watson's swinging door yielded the familiar nesting cart that we see today (albeit the original telescope cart had two baskets rather than one).
Supermarkets brought with them a self service approach to shopping using shopping carts, and were able to offer quality food at lower cost through economies of scale and reduced staffing costs.

Costco

Costco WholesaleCostco Wholesale CorporationCostco brand gasoline
Other stores such as Costco and ShopRite also use the coin deposit system, but it is not used at all of their locations.
Costco also saves money by not stocking extra bags or packing materials; to carry out their goods, customers must use a shopping cart, bring their own bags, or use empty merchandise shipping boxes from the company's vendors.

Motorized shopping cart

* Motorized shopping cart
A motorized shopping cart (also known as electric shopping cart) is a shopping cart equipped with an electric motor and navigational controls.

British English

BritishEnglishUK
A shopping cart (American English) or trolley (British English), also known by a variety of other names, is a cart supplied by a shop, especially supermarkets, for use by customers inside the shop for transport of merchandise to the checkout counter during shopping.

Retail

retailerretail storeshop
A shopping cart (American English) or trolley (British English), also known by a variety of other names, is a cart supplied by a shop, especially supermarkets, for use by customers inside the shop for transport of merchandise to the checkout counter during shopping.

Customer

customersclientclientele
A shopping cart (American English) or trolley (British English), also known by a variety of other names, is a cart supplied by a shop, especially supermarkets, for use by customers inside the shop for transport of merchandise to the checkout counter during shopping.

Merchandising

merchandisemerchandisedmerchandizing
A shopping cart (American English) or trolley (British English), also known by a variety of other names, is a cart supplied by a shop, especially supermarkets, for use by customers inside the shop for transport of merchandise to the checkout counter during shopping.

Point of sale

point-of-salePOScheckout
A shopping cart (American English) or trolley (British English), also known by a variety of other names, is a cart supplied by a shop, especially supermarkets, for use by customers inside the shop for transport of merchandise to the checkout counter during shopping.

Shopping

comparison shoppingshopshops
A shopping cart (American English) or trolley (British English), also known by a variety of other names, is a cart supplied by a shop, especially supermarkets, for use by customers inside the shop for transport of merchandise to the checkout counter during shopping.

United Kingdom

British🇬🇧UK
In many places in the United States and the United Kingdom, customers are allowed to leave the carts in designated areas within the parking lot, and store personnel will return the carts to the storage area.

Parking lot

car parkparking areaparking lots
In many places in the United States and the United Kingdom, customers are allowed to leave the carts in designated areas within the parking lot, and store personnel will return the carts to the storage area.

Bacteria

bacteriumbacterialeubacteria
Studies have shown that it is advisable for shoppers to sanitize the handles and basket areas prior to handling them or filling them with groceries due to high levels of bacteria that typically live on shopping carts.

Skin flora

skin microbiotacutaneous floramicrobiota
This is due to the carts having a high level of exposure to the skin flora of previous users.

Mobility scooter

mobility scootersscooterscooters
There are also specialized carts designed for two children, and electric mobility scooters with baskets designed for disabled customers.

Caster

casterscastoringcastor
Most carts in the United States have swivel wheels at the front, while the rear wheels are fixed in orientation, while in Europe it is more common to have four swivel wheels.

Oklahoma

OKState of OklahomaOklahoma, USA
One of the first shopping carts was introduced on June 4, 1937, the invention of Sylvan Goldman, owner of the Humpty Dumpty supermarket chain in Oklahoma.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
In urban areas like New York City, where transporting groceries home from the store's parking lot is more likely to involve walking and/or a trip by public transportation than a car ride, privately owned carts resembling Goldman's design are still popular.

Public transport

public transportationpublic transitmass transit
In urban areas like New York City, where transporting groceries home from the store's parking lot is more likely to involve walking and/or a trip by public transportation than a car ride, privately owned carts resembling Goldman's design are still popular.

Paper bag

paperpaper sackBags (Paper)
Instead of baskets, these carts are built to hold the paper bags dispensed by the grocery store.

Royalty payment

royaltiesroyaltyroyalty payments
In exchange, Goldman was granted an exclusive licensing right in addition to the three other licenses previously granted; Telescope Carts, Inc. continued to receive royalties for each cart produced by Goldman's company that incorporated the "nesting" design.