Shortstop

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Shortstop, abbreviated SS, is the baseball or softball fielding position between second and third base, which is considered to be among the most demanding defensive positions.wikipedia
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Batting order (baseball)

batting orderlineupleadoff hitter
Historically the position was assigned to defensive specialists who were typically poor at batting and were often placed at the bottom of the batting order.
The concept of a set batting order is said to have been invented by Alexander Cartwright, who also instituted rules such as the foul ball and tagging the runner (as opposed to pegging him with the ball), and devised the shortstop position.

Baseball positions

positionfieldingplayers
Shortstop, abbreviated SS, is the baseball or softball fielding position between second and third base, which is considered to be among the most demanding defensive positions.
1 (pitcher), 2 (catcher), 3 (first baseman), 4 (second baseman), 5 (third baseman), 6 (shortstop), 7 (left fielder) also, less commonly known as left outfield, 8 (center fielder), and 9 (right fielder).

Doc Adams

Daniel "Doc" AdamsAdamsDr. D. L. Adams
Doc Adams of the Knickerbockers created the concept of the shortstop position, according to baseball historian John Thorn and Baseball Hall of Fame researcher Freddy Berowski.
Researchers have called Adams the creator of the shortstop position, which he used to field short throws from outfielders.

Third baseman

third base3Bthird basemen
Shortstop, abbreviated SS, is the baseball or softball fielding position between second and third base, which is considered to be among the most demanding defensive positions. Also, like a third baseman, the shortstop fields balls hit to the left side of the infield, where a strong arm is needed to throw out a batter-runner before they reach the safety of first base.
Expectations of how well a third baseman should be able to hit have varied a great deal over time; in the early years of the sport, these expectations were similar to those for shortstops, the third baseman being merely the less skilled defensive player.

Second baseman

second base2Bsecond
Shortstop, abbreviated SS, is the baseball or softball fielding position between second and third base, which is considered to be among the most demanding defensive positions.
In this case, if the runner is to be forced out at second base then that base is covered by the shortstop.

Infield

diamondfour infield positionsIF
Also, like a third baseman, the shortstop fields balls hit to the left side of the infield, where a strong arm is needed to throw out a batter-runner before they reach the safety of first base.
It also refers to the defensive unit of players that are positioned in the region: first baseman, second baseman, shortstop, third baseman.

Baseball field

home platecenter fieldbaseball diamond
Unlike the pitcher and catcher, who must start every play in a designated area (the pitcher must be on the pitcher's mound, with one foot in contact with the pitcher's rubber, and the catcher must be behind home plate in the catcher's box) the shortstop and the other fielders can vary their positioning in response to what they anticipate will be the actions of the batter and runner(s) once the play begins.
Second base is typically defended by the second baseman and the shortstop.

Ernie Banks

Banks
In practice, a marginal fielder as a shortstop who hits well can be moved to almost any other position, especially second base or third base, whether early in their careers (examples: George Brett and Mike Schmidt were both tried early in their careers as shortstops) or later due to diminished fielding range, slower reflexes, weaker throwing arms, increased risk of injury, or co-existence with another dominant shortstop, as with Ernie Banks, Cal Ripken Jr., Alex Rodríguez, Michael Young, or Miguel Tejada.
Ernest Banks (January 31, 1931 – January 23, 2015), nicknamed "Mr. Cub" and "Mr. Sunshine", was an American professional baseball player who starred in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a shortstop and first baseman for the Chicago Cubs between 1953 and 1971.

Cal Ripken Jr.

Cal Ripken, Jr.Cal RipkenCal Ripken, Jr
In practice, a marginal fielder as a shortstop who hits well can be moved to almost any other position, especially second base or third base, whether early in their careers (examples: George Brett and Mike Schmidt were both tried early in their careers as shortstops) or later due to diminished fielding range, slower reflexes, weaker throwing arms, increased risk of injury, or co-existence with another dominant shortstop, as with Ernie Banks, Cal Ripken Jr., Alex Rodríguez, Michael Young, or Miguel Tejada.
Calvin Edwin Ripken Jr. (born August 24, 1960), nicknamed "The Iron Man", is an American former baseball shortstop and third baseman who played 21 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Baltimore Orioles (1981–2001).

Mendoza Line

The Mendoza Line.200dismal .215 batting average of Mario Mendoza
Some of the weakest hitters in Major League Baseball have played the position, including Mario Mendoza, for whom George Brett popularized the eponymous Mendoza Line to describe a batting average below .200.
The Mendoza Line is an expression in baseball deriving from the name of shortstop Mario Mendoza, whose poor batting average is taken to define the threshold of incompetent hitting.

Defensive spectrum

most demanding
Shortstop, abbreviated SS, is the baseball or softball fielding position between second and third base, which is considered to be among the most demanding defensive positions.
Designated hitter – First baseman – Left fielder – Right fielder – Third baseman – Center fielder – Second baseman – Shortstop – Catcher – Pitcher

Miguel Tejada

Tejada
In practice, a marginal fielder as a shortstop who hits well can be moved to almost any other position, especially second base or third base, whether early in their careers (examples: George Brett and Mike Schmidt were both tried early in their careers as shortstops) or later due to diminished fielding range, slower reflexes, weaker throwing arms, increased risk of injury, or co-existence with another dominant shortstop, as with Ernie Banks, Cal Ripken Jr., Alex Rodríguez, Michael Young, or Miguel Tejada.
Miguel Odalis Tejada (born Tejeda, May 25, 1974) is a Dominican former professional baseball shortstop who played 16 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB).

George Brett

George Brett (baseball)BrettBrett Bros Sport
Some of the weakest hitters in Major League Baseball have played the position, including Mario Mendoza, for whom George Brett popularized the eponymous Mendoza Line to describe a batting average below .200.
Brett began his professional baseball career as a shortstop, but had trouble going to his right defensively and was soon shifted to third base.

Luke Appling

Lucius Benjamin "Luke" Appling (April 2, 1907 – January 3, 1991), nicknamed "Old Aches and Pains" was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the Chicago White Sox (1930–1950).

Luis Aparicio

Luis Aparicio, Jr.[Luis] AparicioLuis '''Aparicio
He played as a shortstop in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1956 to 1973, most notably for the Chicago White Sox with whom he became known for his exceptional defensive and base stealing skills.

Mike Schmidt

baseball playerSchmidt
In practice, a marginal fielder as a shortstop who hits well can be moved to almost any other position, especially second base or third base, whether early in their careers (examples: George Brett and Mike Schmidt were both tried early in their careers as shortstops) or later due to diminished fielding range, slower reflexes, weaker throwing arms, increased risk of injury, or co-existence with another dominant shortstop, as with Ernie Banks, Cal Ripken Jr., Alex Rodríguez, Michael Young, or Miguel Tejada.
He led the Ohio Bobcats baseball team to the College World Series in and was selected as the shortstop for the 1970 College Baseball All-America Team.

Mario Mendoza

Mendoza Line
Some of the weakest hitters in Major League Baseball have played the position, including Mario Mendoza, for whom George Brett popularized the eponymous Mendoza Line to describe a batting average below .200.
For the season, Mendoza batted .221 in 91 games, but he had only 177 plate appearances as he was primarily a defensive replacement when starting Pirates shortstop Frank Taveras (who himself only had a .246 batting average in 1974) had been pinch hit for late in a game.

Dave Bancroft

Dave "Beauty" Bancroft
David James "Beauty" Bancroft (April 20, 1891 – October 9, 1972) was an American professional baseball shortstop and manager.

Joe Cronin

Joseph Edward Cronin (October 12, 1906 – September 7, 1984) was a Major League Baseball (MLB) shortstop, manager and general manager.

Michael Young (baseball)

Michael Young Michael YoungMike Young
In practice, a marginal fielder as a shortstop who hits well can be moved to almost any other position, especially second base or third base, whether early in their careers (examples: George Brett and Mike Schmidt were both tried early in their careers as shortstops) or later due to diminished fielding range, slower reflexes, weaker throwing arms, increased risk of injury, or co-existence with another dominant shortstop, as with Ernie Banks, Cal Ripken Jr., Alex Rodríguez, Michael Young, or Miguel Tejada.
Originally a second baseman, the versatile Young was a five-time All-Star at shortstop, once at third base, and once as a combination designated hitter / utility infielder.

George Davis (baseball)

George DavisGeorge Davis (shortstop)George Davis (SS)
George Stacey Davis (August 23, 1870 – October 17, 1940) was an American professional baseball shortstop and manager in Major League Baseball at the turn of the 20th century.

Travis Jackson

Travis Calvin Jackson (November 2, 1903 – July 27, 1987) was an American baseball shortstop.

Barry Larkin

Barry Larkin (MLB)Champions Sport ComplexLarkin, Barry
Barry Louis Larkin (born April 28, 1964) is a retired Major League Baseball (MLB) player who played shortstop for the Cincinnati Reds from 1986 to 2004.

Covering a base

covering the basecover second basecovered
Shortstops are required to cover second base in double play situations when the ball is hit to the second baseman or first baseman.
In general, the first baseman covers first base, the second baseman or shortstop covers second, the third baseman covers third, and the catcher covers home plate.

Rabbit Maranville

Walter "Rabbit" MaranvilleRabbi Maranville
Walter James Vincent "Rabbit" Maranville (November 11, 1891 – January 6, 1954) was an American professional baseball shortstop, second baseman and manager.