A report on Shoshone

Rabbit-Tail
A Shoshone encampment in the Wind River Mountains of Wyoming, photographed by W. H. Jackson, 1870
Reported picture of Mike Daggett February 26,1911
Sheriff Charles Ferrel with the surviving members of Mike Daggett's family ( Dagget's daughter Heney (Louise, 17), and two of his grandchildren, Cleveland (Mosho, 8), Hattie (Harriet Mosho, 4))
Dagget grandchild Mary Jo Estep {1909/1910-1992} age 5 in 1916
Tindoor, Lemhi Shoshone chief and his wife, ca. 1897, photographed by Benedicte Wrensted
"Shoshone at Ft. Washakie, Wyoming Native American reservation. Chief Washakie (at left) extends his right arm." Some of the Shoshones are dancing as the soldiers look on, 1892

They traditionally speak the Shoshoni language, part of the Numic languages branch of the large Uto-Aztecan language family.

- Shoshone
Rabbit-Tail

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Northern Paiute people

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Now eastern California, western Nevada, and southeast Oregon.

Now eastern California, western Nevada, and southeast Oregon.

Chief Winnemucca, Chief of the Paiutes. He was also named Poito.
Sarah Winnemucca, Paiute writer and lecturer
Captain John, Leader of the Yosemite-Mono Lake Paiutes

Relations among the Northern Paiute and their Shoshone neighbors were generally peaceful.

Wyoming

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State in the Mountain West subregion of the Western United States.

State in the Mountain West subregion of the Western United States.

The first Fort Laramie as it looked before 1840 (painting from memory by Alfred Jacob Miller)
A backcountry road in the Sierra Madre Range of southeastern Wyoming, near Bridger Peak
Köppen climate types of Wyoming, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
On Interstate 80, leaving Utah
Autumn in the Bighorn Mountains
Teton Range
Green River valley
An enlargeable map of the 23 counties of Wyoming
Since 2016, Wyoming license plates feature Squaretop Mountain in the background
Cheyenne, Wyoming
Casper, Wyoming
Rock Springs, Wyoming
Evanston, Wyoming
Rawlins, Wyoming
Wyoming is home to 12 ski resorts, including Grand Targhee and Jackson Hole.
Wind farm in Uinta County
North Antelope Rochelle Mine, the largest estimated coal mine reserve in the world, as of 2013
A natural gas rig west of the Wind River Range
Major highways of Wyoming
Wind River Canyon
Wyoming terrain map
National Park Service sites map
The largest population centers are Cheyenne (southeast) and Casper.
Wyoming State Capitol building, Cheyenne
State flower of Wyoming: Indian paintbrush
The Rocky Mountain Herbarium at the University of Wyoming
Yellowstone National Park
Devils Tower National Monument
Thunder Basin National Grassland
Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge

Historic and current federally recognized tribes include the Arapaho, Crow, Lakota, and Shoshone.

Nevada

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State in the Western region of the United States.

State in the Western region of the United States.

Mexico in 1824. Alta California included today's Nevada.
Sculpture representing a steam locomotive, in Ely, Nevada. Early locomotives played an important part in Nevada's mining industry.
Nevada territory in 1861
Mountains west of Las Vegas in the Mojave Desert
A valley near Pyramid Lake
Topographic map of Nevada
Little Finland rock formation in Nevada
Köppen climate types of Nevada, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
The Las Vegas Strip looking South
Carson City Mint in Carson City. Carson City is an independent city and the capital of Nevada.
Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area, Calico basin
Great Basin National Park
The quartzite of Doso Doyabi in Great Basin National Park
Valley of Fire State Park
Mount Charleston
Population density map of Nevada
The Winnemucca Sand Dunes, north of Winnemucca
Downtown Reno
East Las Vegas suburbs
Nevada quarter
MGM Grand, with sign promoting it as The City of Entertainment
Lake Tahoe on the Nevada–California border
Goldstrike (Post-Betze) Mine in the Carlin Trend, the largest Carlin-type deposit in the world, containing more than 35000000 ozt gold
Cattle near the Bruneau River in Elko County
Ranching in Washoe County
State route shield
U.S. Route50, also known as "The Loneliest Road in America"
The Nevada State Legislative Building in Carson City
The courthouse of the Supreme Court of Nevada
A map that details the federal land in southern Nevada, showing Nellis Air Force Base Complex and Nevada Test Site
Party registration by county (February 2021):

American Indians of the Paiute, Shoshone, and Washoe tribes inhabit what is now Nevada.

Utah

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State in the Mountain West subregion of the Western United States.

State in the Mountain West subregion of the Western United States.

Map showing Utah in 1838 when it was part of Mexico, Britannica 7th edition
Brigham Young led the first Mormon pioneers to the Great Salt Lake.
A sketch of Salt Lake City in 1860
Deseret Village recreates Utah pioneer life for tourists.
The Golden Spike where the First Transcontinental Railroad was completed in the U.S. on May 10, 1869, in Promontory, Utah
Children reading in Santa Clara, Utah, in 1940
Utah county boundaries
Köppen climate types of Utah, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Snow in Rose Park, Salt Lake City
The Rocky Mountain elk is the Utah state mammal.
The California gull is the Utah state bird.
Western black widow spider
Pando, considered one of the heaviest and oldest organisms on Earth.
Joshua trees, yuccas, and cholla cactus occupy the far southwest corner of the state in the Mojave Desert
"Welcome to Utah" sign
Utah population density map
The LDS Salt Lake Temple, the primary attraction in the city's Temple Square
First Presbyterian Church in Salt Lake City
Sri Sri Radha Krishna (Hindu) Temple
The Wasatch Front region has seen large growth and development despite the economic downturn. Shown is the City Creek Center project, a development in downtown Salt Lake City with a price tag of $1.5–2.5 billion.
One out of every 14 flash memory chips in the world is produced in Lehi, Utah.
Zion National Park in southern Utah is one of five national parks in the state.
Farms and ranches
Bryce Canyon National Park Amphitheater (winter view)
Mining has been a large industry in Utah since it was first settled. The Bingham Canyon Mine in Salt Lake County is one of the largest open pit mines in the world.
Salt Lake International Airport is the largest airport in Utah
FrontRunner commuter rail serves select cities from Ogden to Provo via Salt Lake City.
TRAX light rail serves Salt Lake County
Jake Garn (top-right), former Senator of Utah (1974–1993), and astronaut on Space Shuttle flight STS-51-D
The Utah State Capitol, Salt Lake City
The Scott Matheson Courthouse is the seat of the Utah Supreme Court.
The Huntsman Cancer Institute on the campus of the University of Utah in Salt Lake City
The Eyring Science Center on the campus of Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah
The Utah Jazz playing against the Houston Rockets
Robbie Russell playing for Real Salt Lake
Arches National Park
Pariette Wetlands
Little Cottonwood Canyon
Deer Creek Reservoir
American Fork Canyon
Kolob Canyons at Zion National Park
Salt Lake City
Logan
thumb|Ogden
Park City
Provo
Sandy
St. George
Layton
Monument Valley in southeastern Utah. This area was used to film many Hollywood Westerns.
The otherworldly look of the Bonneville Salt Flats has been used in many movies and commercials.

In the mid-18th century, other Uto-Aztecan tribes, including the Goshute, the Paiute, the Shoshone, and the Ute people, also settled in the region.

Idaho

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State in the Pacific Northwest region of the Western United States.

State in the Pacific Northwest region of the Western United States.

Köppen climate types of Idaho, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Lake Coeur d'Alene in North Idaho
Redfish Lake in central Idaho
Priest River winding through Whitetail Butte
Bear Lake viewed from Bear Lake State Park
Bruneau Dunes State Park
Idaho population density map
There are large numbers of Americans of German and English ancestry in Idaho.
The Idaho Falls Idaho Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 2006
Average Fuel Mix (2011–2015)
I-15 shield
US-95 shield
The Idaho State Capitol in Boise
Chamber of the House of Representatives in 2018
The Jacob Spori Building at Brigham Young University-Idaho in Rexburg
Idaho State University in Pocatello
University of Idaho Arboretum in Moscow
American Falls Dam
Wheat harvest on the Palouse
A portion of Yellowstone national Park is located in Idaho. The other parts are in Montana and Wyoming.
Party registration by county (December 2018):

American Indian peoples predominant in the area included the Nez Percé in the north and the Northern and Western Shoshone in the south.

Map of traditional lands of the Northern Shoshone

Northern Shoshone

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Map of traditional lands of the Northern Shoshone

Northern Shoshone are Shoshone of the Snake River Plain of southern Idaho and the northeast of the Great Basin where Idaho, Wyoming and Utah meet.

Shoshoni language

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Shoshoni, also written as Shoshoni-Gosiute and Shoshone (Shoshoni: soni ' ta̲i̲kwappe, newe ta̲i̲kwappe or neme ta̲i̲kwappeh) is a Numic language of the Uto-Aztecan family, spoken in the Western United States by the Shoshone people.

Flag of the Western Shoshone Nation

Western Shoshone

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Flag of the Western Shoshone Nation

The Western Shoshone comprise several Shoshone tribes that are indigenous to the Great Basin and have lands identified in the Treaty of Ruby Valley 1863.

Chief Severo and family, c. 1899

Ute people

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Ute are the Indigenous people of the Ute tribe and culture among the Indigenous peoples of the Great Basin.

Ute are the Indigenous people of the Ute tribe and culture among the Indigenous peoples of the Great Basin.

Chief Severo and family, c. 1899
Distribution of Uto-Aztecan languages in present-day Western United States at the time of first European contact/invasion
The Ute Trail, later called the Old Spanish Trail, was a trade route between Santa Fe and California, through Colorado and Utah. It was later used by European explorers of the west.
Henry Chapman Ford, Ute camp, by 1894
Cañon Pintado, south of Rangely in Rio Blanco County, Colorado
Ute petroglyphs at Arches National Park
An Uncompahgre Ute shaved beaver hide painting, made by trapping beavers and shaving images into the stretched and cured hides. They have used these paintings to decorate their personal and ceremonial dwellings.
Distribution of Ute Indian bands: 1. Pahvant, 2. Moanunt, 3. Sanpits, 4. Timpanogots, 5. Uintah, 6. Seuvarits (Sheberetch), 7. Yampa, 8. Parianuche, 8a. Sabuagana, 9. Tabeguache, 10. Weeminuche, 11. Capote, 12. Muache. University Press of Colorado.
John Wesley Powell first became acquainted with the Utes along the White River in northwestern Colorado in the fall of 1868. During his expedition five years later, his photographer, Jack Hillers, captured this photograph of a young girl accompanied by a warrior, whose body, painted with yellow and black stripes, is marked for battle.
Delegation of Ute Indians in Washington, D.C. in 1880. Background: Woretsiz and general Charles Adams (Colorado Indian agent) are standing. Front from left to right: Chief Ignacio of the Southern Utes; Carl Schurz US Secretary of the Interior; Chief Ouray and his wife Chipeta.
Territory from Treaty of 1868, relinquishing land east of the Contintental Divide, including Pikes Peak and San Luis Valley sacred and hunting grounds
Map of present-day reservations
A Northern Ute dancer performs the Gourd Dance. The Gourd dance originates from the Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma.
Abronia fragrans
A Northern Ute Beaded Pipebag. This pipebag— made from brain-tanned mule-deer hide, glass trade beads, and eagle bone—incorporates the sacred symbols of the Ute: the blue fire, the yellow fire, the green of the earth, and the hail of the thunder beings; motifs of the turtle (earth) and moccasin (home), and the symbol of the red fire and the bear, sacred animal of the Ute.
An early 1900s Uncompahgre Ute beaded horse bag, which has been used to hold sacred religious totems, pipes, and carvings, sometimes an effigy of a medicine horse or medicine buffalo, or some other totem of power. The objects were associated and used in private prayer and family rituals.
A Northern Ute ceremonial knife made from white quartz and Western cedar wood. These knives were used to cut the umbilical cord of a newborn infant or to harvest sweetgrass and other sacred herbs for ceremonies.
An Uncompahgre Ute Buffalo rawhide ceremonial rattle filled with quartz crystals. The rattle produces flashes of light (mechanoluminescence) created when quartz crystals are subjected to mechanical stress when the rattle is shaken in darkness.
Uncompahgre Ute Salmon Alabaster Ceremonial Pipe. Ute pipe styles are similar to those of the Plains Indians, with notable differences. Ute pipes are thicker and use shorter pipestems than the Plains style, and more closely resemble the pipe styles of their Northern neighbors, the Shoshone.

By about 1000, there were hunters and gatherers in the Great Basin of Uto-Aztecan ethnicity that are believed to have been the ancestors of the Indigenous tribes of the Great Basin, including the Ute, Shoshone, Hopi, Paiute, and Chemehuevi peoples.

Six chiefs of the Blackfoot Confederacy in 1859

Blackfoot Confederacy

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Historic collective name for linguistically related groups that make up the Blackfoot or Blackfeet people: the Siksika ("Blackfoot"), the Kainai or Blood ("Many Chiefs"), and two sections of the Peigan or Piikani ("Splotchy Robe") – the Northern Piikani (Aapátohsipikáni) and the Southern Piikani (Amskapi Piikani or Pikuni).

Historic collective name for linguistically related groups that make up the Blackfoot or Blackfeet people: the Siksika ("Blackfoot"), the Kainai or Blood ("Many Chiefs"), and two sections of the Peigan or Piikani ("Splotchy Robe") – the Northern Piikani (Aapátohsipikáni) and the Southern Piikani (Amskapi Piikani or Pikuni).

Six chiefs of the Blackfoot Confederacy in 1859
Six chiefs of the Blackfoot Confederacy in 1859
Six chiefs of the Blackfoot Confederacy in 1859
Chief Aatsista-Mahkan, c.1905.
Blackfoot teepees, Glacier National Park, 1933
Kainai (Blood) women with travois.
Bison hunters with wolf skin disguises.
Depiction of Bison being driven over a "buffalo jump".
Mounted Blackfoot warrior on horse painted from life by Karl Bodmer.
Three mounted Piegan chiefs on the prairie. Photographed by Edward S. Curtis.
Blackfoot warriors at Fort MacLeod, 1907
When Blackfoot and Sioux Meet by western artist Charles Marion Russell.
The Death of Omoxesisixany or Big Snake by Paul Kane, depicting a battle between a Blackfoot and Plains Cree warrior on horseback.
Blackfeet Burning Crow Buffalo Range by Charles Marion Russell.
Buffalo Bull's Back Fat, Head Chief, of the Blood Tribe by George Catlin.
Mehkskeme-Sukahs, Blackfoot chief (c. 1840).
Single-Handed, Charles Marion Russell 1912. The painting shows a North-West Mounted Police officer attempting to arrest a defiant warrior at a Blood camp, probably in Alberta or Saskatchewan.
Dog Child (Winnipeg Jack), a Blackfoot scout and interpreter for the NWMP.
Colorized photograph of chief Mountain Chief
Frances Densmore recording chief Mountain Chief for the Bureau of American Ethnology in 1916.
Scalp dance, Blackfoot Indians, 1907
Women of the Blood Nation in battle dress, 1907
Blackfoot making sweet grass medicine for a ceremony.
Blackfoot man with braided sweet grass ropes
Horned bonnet with ermine skin.
Head Carry, a Piegan man wearing a split horn headdress. Photographed by Edward S. Curtis, 1900.
Headdress Case, Blackfoot (Native American), late 19th century, Brooklyn Museum
A Siksika Blackfeet Medicine Man, painted by George Catlin.
Earl Old Person, honorary chief of the Blackfoot.
Blackfoot gathering, Alberta. 1973
Chief Mountain is sacred to the Blackfoot. The mountain marks the boundary between the Blackfoot reservation in Montana and Glacier National Park.
Chief Crowfoot.

They had not seen horses in their previous lands, but were introduced to them on the Plains, as other tribes, such as the Shoshone, had already adopted their use.