Shot tower

How a shot tower works

Tower designed for the production of small-diameter shot balls by free fall of molten lead, which is then caught in a water basin.

- Shot tower
How a shot tower works

4 related topics

Alpha

Redcliffe Street, by James Johnson, oil on canvas, c. 1825, showing the incomplete spire of St Mary Redcliffe looming above.

Redcliffe, Bristol

District of the English port city of Bristol, adjoining the city centre to the northwest.

District of the English port city of Bristol, adjoining the city centre to the northwest.

Redcliffe Street, by James Johnson, oil on canvas, c. 1825, showing the incomplete spire of St Mary Redcliffe looming above.
St Mary's church and surrounding modern development, seen from the Cabot Tower.

In 1782 William Watts converted his house, near St Mary Redcliffe, into the world's first shot tower, in order to make lead shot by his innovative tower process.

Redcliffe Shot Tower

The Redcliffe Shot Tower was a historic shot tower in the English city of Bristol.

Tokyo Skytree, the tallest tower in the world

Tower

Tall structure, taller than it is wide, often by a significant factor.

Tall structure, taller than it is wide, often by a significant factor.

Tokyo Skytree, the tallest tower in the world
Azadi Tower in Tehran, Iran; an example of Iranian architecture of various periods
Roman tower (reconstruction) at Limes – Taunus / Germany
Eiffel Tower in Paris

For industrial production: shot tower

Lead shot

Shot (pellet)

Collective term for small spheres or pellets, often made of lead.

Collective term for small spheres or pellets, often made of lead.

Lead shot
Shot tower at Clifton Hill, Melbourne, Australia
Selection of post-medieval lead shot
X-ray of lead shot accumulated in the gizzard of a dead swan

Lead shot was originally made by pouring molten lead through screens into water, forming what was known as "swan shot", and, later, more economically mass-produced at higher quality using a shot tower.