Shulchan Aruch

Shulkhan ArukhShulchan ArukhShulhan ArukhShulḥan 'ArukCode of Jewish LawShulhan ArukShulkhan AruchCode of the Set TableShulchan 'ArukShulhan Aruch
The Shulchan Aruch (, literally: "Set Table"), sometimes dubbed in English as the Code of Jewish Law, is the most widely consulted of the various legal codes in Judaism.wikipedia
456 Related Articles

Joseph Karo

Joseph CaroYosef KaroJoseph ben Ephraim Karo
It was authored in Safed (today in Israel) by Joseph Karo in 1563 and published in Venice two years later.
Joseph ben Ephraim Karo, also spelled Yosef Caro, or Qaro (יוסף קארו; 1488 – March 24, 1575, 13 Nisan 5335 A.M.), was author of the last great codification of Jewish law, the Shulchan Aruch, which is still authoritative for all Jews pertaining to their respective communities.

Arba'ah Turim

TurTur Shulchan AruchTurim
The Shulchan Aruch (and its forerunner, the Beit Yosef) follow the same structure as Arba'ah Turim by Rabbi Jacob ben Asher.
The four-part structure of the Tur and its division into chapters (simanim) were adopted by the later code Shulchan Aruch.

Safed

SafadTzfatTsfat
It was authored in Safed (today in Israel) by Joseph Karo in 1563 and published in Venice two years later.
After the expulsion of all the Jews from Spain in 1492, many prominent rabbis found their way to Safed, among them the Kabbalists Isaac Luria and Moshe Kordovero; Joseph Caro, the author of the Shulchan Aruch and Shlomo Halevi Alkabetz, composer of the Sabbath hymn "Lecha Dodi".

Beit Yosef (book)

Beit YosefBet YosefBeit Yosef'' (book)
The Shulchan Aruch (and its forerunner, the Beit Yosef) follow the same structure as Arba'ah Turim by Rabbi Jacob ben Asher.
It served as a precursor to the Shulchan Aruch, which Rabbi Caro wrote later in his life.

Orach Chayim

Orach ChaimOrach HayyimOraḥ Ḥayyim
Rabbi Yosef Karo modeled the framework of the Shulkhan Arukh, his own compilation of practical Jewish law, after the Arba'ah Turim. Many later commentators used this framework, as well.

Sephardic law and customs

SephardicSephardiSephardic Judaism
The halachic rulings in the Shulchan Aruch generally follow Sephardic law and customs, whereas Ashkenazi Jews will generally follow the halachic rulings of Moses Isserles, whose glosses to the Shulchan Aruch note where the Sephardic and Ashkenazi customs differ.
Following the expulsion of the Jews from Spain, Jewish law was codified by Joseph Caro in his Bet Yosef, which took the form of a commentary on the Arba'ah Turim, and Shulḥan Aruch, which presented the same results in the form of a practical abridgement.

Conversion to Judaism

converted to Judaismconvertedconversion
For Rabbinic Judaism, the laws governing conversion (gerut) are based on codes of law and texts, including discussions in the Talmud, through the Shulkhan Arukh and subsequent interpretations.

Yoreh De'ah

Yoreh DeahTur Yoreh De'ahY"D
Later, Rabbi Yosef Karo modeled the framework of his own compilation of practical Jewish law, the Shulchan Aruch, after the Arba'ah Turim. Many later commentators used this framework, as well.

Moses Isserles

RemaMoshe IsserlesIsserles
The halachic rulings in the Shulchan Aruch generally follow Sephardic law and customs, whereas Ashkenazi Jews will generally follow the halachic rulings of Moses Isserles, whose glosses to the Shulchan Aruch note where the Sephardic and Ashkenazi customs differ.
Isserles is perhaps best known for his halakhic works, chief among them his notes to the Shulchan Aruch by Yosef Karo.

Damages (Jewish law)

damagesrabbinic damagesviolating Jewish law
In the Shulchan Aruch (16th century), the topic is codified primarily within Hoshen Mishpat, the section (Tur) most similar to modern civil law.

Kashrut

kosherJewish dietary lawsdietary laws
A late Commentary on the Shulchan Arukh known as the Taz (Turei Zahav), on Yoreh De'ah 69:5:16, writes that the pieces of meat can be "very thick" when salting.

Israel Isserlein

Israel IsserlinTerumat HaDeshenIsserlein
In place of Karo's three standard authorities, Isserles cites "the later authorities" (chiefly based on the works of Yaakov Moelin, Israel Isserlein and Israel Bruna, together with the Franco-German Tosafists) as criteria of opinion.
Israel Isserlin (ישראל איסרלן; Israel Isserlein ben Petachia; 1390 in Maribor, Duchy of Styria – 1460 in Wiener Neustadt, Lower Austria) was a Talmudist, and Halakhist, best known for his Terumat HaDeshen, which served as one source for HaMapah, the component of the Shulkhan Arukh by Moses Isserles.

Posek

poskimauthoritydecisors
After looking through the Bet Yosef, the Rema realized that Karo had mainly relied upon Sephardic poskim.

Yaakov ben Moshe Levi Moelin

MaharilYaakov MoelinJacob Mölln
In place of Karo's three standard authorities, Isserles cites "the later authorities" (chiefly based on the works of Yaakov Moelin, Israel Isserlein and Israel Bruna, together with the Franco-German Tosafists) as criteria of opinion.
Maharil's Minhagim was a source of law for Moses Isserles’ component of the Shulkhan Arukh.

Israel Bruna

Israel of Brno
In place of Karo's three standard authorities, Isserles cites "the later authorities" (chiefly based on the works of Yaakov Moelin, Israel Isserlein and Israel Bruna, together with the Franco-German Tosafists) as criteria of opinion.
Rabbi Bruna is best known as one of the primary Ashkenazi authorities quoted by Moses Isserles in the Shulkhan Arukh.

Bereavement in Judaism

yahrzeityahrtzeitYartzeit
Some have a custom to visit the cemetery on fast days (Shulchan Aruch Orach Chayim 559:10) and before Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur (581:4, 605), when possible, and for a Yahrzeit. During the first year the grave is often visited on the shloshim, and the yartzeit (but may be visited at any time).

Acharonim

AchronimAcharonicAcharon
The Mishna Berura, the main work of halakha by Rabbi Yisrael Meir Kagan (the "Chafetz Chaim") is a collation of the opinions of later authorities on the Orach Chayim section of the Shulchan Aruch.
, Aḥaron; lit. "last ones") in Jewish law and history, are the leading rabbis and poskim (Jewish legal decisors) living from roughly the 16th century to the present, and more specifically since the writing of the Shulchan Aruch (Hebrew:, "Set Table", a code of Jewish law) in 1563 CE.

History of the Jews in Poland

Polish JewsPolish-JewishJewish
The history of the Shulchan Aruch is, in a way, identical with the history of rabbinical literature of the Jews in Poland for a period of two centuries.
Shachna's son Israel became rabbi of Lublin on the death of his father, and Shachna's pupil Moses Isserles (known as the ReMA) (1520–1572) achieved an international reputation among the Jews as the co-author of the Shulkhan Arukh, (the "Code of Jewish Law").

Italian Jews

Italian JewishItalianJewish-Italian
In matters of religious law, Italian-rite Jews generally follow the same rules as the Sephardim, in that they accept the authority of Isaac Alfasi and the Shulchan Aruch as opposed to the Ashkenazi customs codified by Moses Isserles (the Rema).

Even Ha'ezer

Even HaEzerEven ha-'ezerEven ha-`Ezer
Later, Rabbi Yosef Karo modeled the framework of his own compilation of practical Jewish law, the Shulchan Aruch, after the Arba'ah Turim.

Rabbi

rabbisOrthodox Rabbimara d'atra
They study sections of the Shulchan Aruch (codified Jewish law) and its main commentaries that pertain to daily-life questions (such as the laws of keeping kosher, Shabbat, and the laws of family purity).

Names of God in Judaism

AdonaiGodHaShem
But he abandoned this idea because, as he wrote: "Who has the courage to rear his head aloft among mountains, the heights of God?"
This was discouraged by Rabbi David HaLevi Segal in his commentary to the Shulchan Aruch.

Beth din

dayanrabbinical courtbeit din
A beth din is sometimes used within the Orthodox Jewish community to resolve civil disputes, with the Shulkhan Arukh calling for civil cases being resolved by religious, instead of secular, courts (arka'oth).

David HaLevi Segal

TazTurei ZahavDavid ben Samuel
1586 – 20 February 1667), also known as the Turei Zahav (abbreviated Taz ) after the title of his significant halakhic commentary on the Shulchan Aruch, was one of the greatest Polish rabbinical authorities.

Jewish prayer

Jewish liturgyservicesKabbalat Shabbat
Many Jewish women have relied on an idea expressed by(Ashkenazi) Rabbi Avraham Gombiner in his Magen Avraham commentary on the Shulkhan Arukh, and more recently the (Sephardi) Rabbi Ovadia Yosef (Yabiah Omer vol.