A report on Shulchan Aruch

Most widely consulted of the various legal codes in Judaism.

- Shulchan Aruch

64 related topics with Alpha

Overall

A full set of the Babylonian Talmud

Halakha

32 links

Collective body of Jewish religious laws which is derived from the written and Oral Torah.

Collective body of Jewish religious laws which is derived from the written and Oral Torah.

A full set of the Babylonian Talmud
Sefer Torah at Glockengasse Synagogue (museum exhibits), Cologne
Hasidim walk to the synagogue, Rehovot, Israel.
A mixed-gender, egalitarian Conservative service at Robinson's Arch, Western Wall
Set of Mishneh Torah
Shulchan Aruch HaRav
Peninei Halakha Set
An illuminated manuscript of Arba'ah Turim from 1435

Halakha is based on biblical commandments (mitzvot), subsequent Talmudic and rabbinic laws, and the customs and traditions which were compiled in the many books such as the Shulchan Aruch.

An illuminated manuscript of Arba'ah Turim from 1435.

Arba'ah Turim

13 links

Important Halakhic code composed by Yaakov ben Asher (Cologne, 1270 – Toledo, Spain c. 1340, also referred to as Ba'al Ha-Turim).

Important Halakhic code composed by Yaakov ben Asher (Cologne, 1270 – Toledo, Spain c. 1340, also referred to as Ba'al Ha-Turim).

An illuminated manuscript of Arba'ah Turim from 1435.
A 1565 edition of Even Ha'ezer, the third part of Arba'ah Turim

The four-part structure of the Tur and its division into chapters (simanim) were adopted by the later code Shulchan Aruch.

Artistic conception of Karo's appearance. Painting of 19th century

Joseph Karo

8 links

Artistic conception of Karo's appearance. Painting of 19th century
Synagogue of Maran, R. Joseph Karo, in Safed
Karo's grave in Safed
Title page of Karo's Shulchan Aruch

Joseph ben Ephraim Karo, also spelled Yosef Caro, or Qaro (יוסף קארו; 1488 – March 24, 1575, 13 Nisan 5335 A.M.), was the author of the last great codification of Jewish law, the Beit Yosef, and its popular analogue, the Shulchan Arukh.

Orach Chayim book of 1817/1818 published from the collection of the "Mezhybizh" State Reserve (Ukraine)

Orach Chayim

6 links

Section of Rabbi Jacob ben Asher's compilation of Halakha (Jewish law), Arba'ah Turim.

Section of Rabbi Jacob ben Asher's compilation of Halakha (Jewish law), Arba'ah Turim.

Orach Chayim book of 1817/1818 published from the collection of the "Mezhybizh" State Reserve (Ukraine)

Rabbi Yosef Karo modeled the framework of the Shulkhan Arukh (שולחן ערוך), his own compilation of practical Jewish law, after the Arba'ah Turim. Many later commentators used this framework, as well.

Moses Isserles (Artist's rendering)

Moses Isserles

9 links

Eminent Polish Ashkenazic rabbi, talmudist, and posek (expert in Jewish law).

Eminent Polish Ashkenazic rabbi, talmudist, and posek (expert in Jewish law).

Moses Isserles (Artist's rendering)
The Rema's tombstone at the Remuh Cemetery, Kraków

Isserles is perhaps best known for his halakhic works, chief among them his notes to the Shulchan Aruch by Yosef Karo.

Mishneh Torah, a code of Jewish law by Maimonides, a Sephardic Jew

Sephardic law and customs

5 links

Sephardic law and customs are the practice of Judaism by the Sephardim, the descendants of the historic Jewish community of the Iberian Peninsula.

Sephardic law and customs are the practice of Judaism by the Sephardim, the descendants of the historic Jewish community of the Iberian Peninsula.

Mishneh Torah, a code of Jewish law by Maimonides, a Sephardic Jew
The Shulchan Aruch. One of the codes of Jewish law reflecting Sephardic laws and customs.

Following the expulsion of the Jews from Spain, Jewish law was codified by Joseph Caro in his Bet Yosef, which took the form of a commentary on the Arba'ah Turim, and Shulḥan Aruch, which presented the same results in the form of a practical abridgement.

The Jews in Central Europe (1881)

Ashkenazi Jews

9 links

Ashkenazi Jews (יְהוּדֵי אַשְׁכְּנַז, ; אַשכּנזישע ייִדן), also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim, are a Jewish diaspora population who coalesced in the Holy Roman Empire around the end of the first millennium CE.

Ashkenazi Jews (יְהוּדֵי אַשְׁכְּנַז, ; אַשכּנזישע ייִדן), also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim, are a Jewish diaspora population who coalesced in the Holy Roman Empire around the end of the first millennium CE.

The Jews in Central Europe (1881)
The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth at its greatest extent.
Jews from Worms (Germany) wearing the mandatory yellow badge.
The example of the chevra kadisha, the Jewish burial society, Prague, 1772

Differences are noted in the Shulkhan Arukh itself, in the gloss of Moses Isserles.

Beit Yosef (book)

1 links

Long and detailed commentary on the Arba'ah Turim ("Tur") by Jacob ben Asher.

Long and detailed commentary on the Arba'ah Turim ("Tur") by Jacob ben Asher.

The Shulchan Aruch, which Rabbi Karo wrote later in his life, is a condensation of its rulings.

Yosef Karo

Acharonim

10 links

Acharonim (אחרונים Aḥaronim; sing.

Acharonim (אחרונים Aḥaronim; sing.

Yosef Karo
Isaac Aboab da Fonseca
Shneur Zalman of Liadi
Naftali Zvi Yehuda Berlin
Israel Meir Kagan
Menachem Mendel Schneerson
Ovadia Yosef

, Aḥaron; lit. "last ones") in Jewish law and history, are the leading rabbis and poskim (Jewish legal decisors) living from roughly the 16th century to the present, and more specifically since the writing of the Shulchan Aruch (Hebrew:, "Set Table", a code of Jewish law) in 1563 CE.

Yoreh De'ah

2 links

Section of Rabbi Jacob ben Asher's compilation of halakha (Jewish law), Arba'ah Turim around 1300.

Section of Rabbi Jacob ben Asher's compilation of halakha (Jewish law), Arba'ah Turim around 1300.

Later, Rabbi Yosef Karo modeled the framework of his own compilation of practical Jewish law, the Shulchan Aruch, after the Arba'ah Turim. Many later commentators used this framework, as well.