Shulchan Aruch

Shulkhan ArukhShulchan ArukhShulhan ArukhShulḥan 'ArukCode of Jewish LawShulhan ArukShulkhan AruchCode of the Set TableShulchan 'ArukShulhan Aruch
The Shulchan Aruch (, literally: "Set Table"), sometimes dubbed in English as the Code of Jewish Law, is the most widely consulted of the various legal codes in Judaism.wikipedia
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Shabbatai HaKohen

Shabbatai ha-KohenShachShabbethai Kohen
In Cracow in 1646, he published his magnum opus, the Siftei Kohen or the Shakh, a commentary on the Shulchan Aruch Yoreh De'ah. This work was approved by the greatest Polish and Lithuanian scholars and since 1674 has been published in most editions of the Yoreh De'ah.

Yechezkel Landau

Ezekiel LandauNoda BihudahRabbi Yechezkel Landau
A wealth of later works include commentary and exposition by such halachic authorities as the Ketzoth ha-Choshen and Avnei Millu'im, Netivoth ha-Mishpat, the Vilna Gaon, Rabbi Yechezkel Landau (Dagul Mervavah), Rabbis Akiva Eger, Moses Sofer, and Chaim Joseph David Azulai (Birkei Yosef) whose works are widely recognized and cited extensively in later halachic literature.

Jonathan Eybeschutz

Jonathan EybeschützEmden-Eybeschutz controversyJonathan Eibeschutz
Rabbi Jonathan Eybeschutz in particular writes at length about how the great breadth of the work would make it impossible to constantly come to the correct conclusion if not for the "spirit of God".

Orthodox Judaism

OrthodoxOrthodox JewishOrthodox Jews
The former, though narrower in scope, enjoys much wider popularity and is considered authoritative by many adherents of Orthodox Judaism, especially among those typically associated with Ashkenazic yeshivas.
One of the latest and most authoritative codifications is the 1565 Shulchan Aruch, or "Set Table", which gained a canonical status and became almost synonymous, in popular parlance, with the halakhic system itself – though no later authority accepted it in its entirety (for example, all Orthodox Jews don phylacteries in a manner different from the one advocated there), and it was immediately contested or re-interpreted by various commentaries, most prominently the gloss written by Rabbi Moses Isserles named HaMapah.

Joshua Höschel ben Joseph

Maginei ShlomoRabbi Heschel of KrakówYehoshua Heschel
In one of many similar statements by his peers reflecting this unique authority, the 17th century scholar Joshua Höschel ben Joseph writes that "from their wells do we drink and should a question arise (on their work), not for this shall we come to annul their words, rather we must study further as much as we can, and if we are unable to resolve (our question) then we will ascribe it to our own lack of knowledge and not (as a reason to) annul the words of these geniuses..."
Among his students was Rav Shabbatai HaKohen (1621–1662), also known as The Shach, one of the greatest commentators on the Shulchan Aruch.

Samuel ben Uri Shraga Phoebus

Samuel ben PhoebusOr Shraga*Rabbi Samuel Phoebus
Samuel wrote in Hebrew a clear and comprehensive commentary, known as Beit Shmuel, on the Shulhan Aruk, Eben ha'Ezer, which appeared in Dyhernfurth in 1689, being the first Hebrew work printed there.

Moses ben Isaac Judah Lima

Chelkath MechokekRabbi Moses Lima
He left a manuscript commentary on Shulchan Aruch, Eben Ha-Ezer, which his son Raphael published (1670) under the title of Ḥelḳat Meḥoḳeḳ, and which, while betraying profound erudition, was so condensed that the editor deemed it necessary to provide it with explanatory notes.

Avraham Danzig

Chochmat AdamAbraham DanzigChochmath Adam
Rabbi Abraham Danzig was the first in the Lithuanian Jewish community to attempt a summary of the opinions in the above-mentioned works in his Chayei Adam and Chochmath Adam.
Danzig authored several important works, but he is especially known for Chayei Adam and Chochmat Adam, his works of halacha covering the laws of the Shulchan Aruch dealing with everyday life.

Zechariah Mendel ben Aryeh Leib

Zechariah Mendel ben Aryeh Leib of Cracow
He was the author of Be'er Heitev, a well-known commentary on the Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh De'ah, and Ḥoshen Mishpaṭ (first edition of the first part, Amsterdam, 1754; of the second, ib.

Dov Ber of Mezeritch

Maggid of MezeritchDovber of MezeritchDovber
Rabbi Shneur Zalman of Liadi wrote a "Shulchan Aruch" at the behest of the Hasidic leader, Rabbi Dovber of Mezeritch.
The elite group of disciples, the "Chevraya Kaddisha" ("Holy Society"), included Rabbis Aharon of Karlin, Menachem Mendel of Vitebsk, Elimelech of Lizhensk, Zusha of Hanipol, Shmelka (later Chief Rabbi of Nikolsburg), Pinchas Horowitz (later Chief Rabbi of Frankfurt-am-Main and author of profound Talmudic commentaries), and Shneur Zalman of Liadi (author of the Tanya, and by instructions of his master, author of an updated version of the Shulchan Aruch code of Jewish Law for the new movement).

Yehuda Heller Kahana

YehudaYehuda Heller
Rabbi Yehuda Heller Kahana, however, says that Eybeschutz's reasoning is farfetched.
R. Yehuda wrote: Kuntras HaSfeikos which documents cases in the g'marah regarding monetary disputes, as well as Terumas Hakeri, a commentary on the Shulchan Aruch.

Hayyim Mordecai Margolioth

Chaim Mordechai MargoliotChaim Mordechai Margulies
He was among those who elected the three deputies sent to St. Petersburg to confer with the government upon Jewish affairs, and was the author of Sha'are Teshubah (Gates of Repentance) a commentary to Shulḥan 'Aruk; it contains extracts from other works and appears in most editions of the Shulḥan 'Aruk. He died at Dunajowce in 1818.

Shneur Zalman of Liadi

Schneur Zalman of LiadiSchneur ZalmanBaal HaTanya
Rabbi Shneur Zalman of Liadi wrote a "Shulchan Aruch" at the behest of the Hasidic leader, Rabbi Dovber of Mezeritch.
The Maggid of Mezeritch sought a new version of the classic Shulkhan Arukh for the Hasidic movement.

Yeshiva

yeshivotyeshivahyeshivas
The former, though narrower in scope, enjoys much wider popularity and is considered authoritative by many adherents of Orthodox Judaism, especially among those typically associated with Ashkenazic yeshivas.
The Mishnah Berurah is a compilation of halachic opinions rendered after the time of the writing of the Shulchan Aruch.

Yisrael Meir Kagan

Chofetz ChaimIsrael Meir KaganChafetz Chaim
The Mishna Berura, the main work of halakha by Rabbi Yisrael Meir Kagan (the "Chafetz Chaim") is a collation of the opinions of later authorities on the Orach Chayim section of the Shulchan Aruch.

Codification (law)

codifiedcodificationcodify
The Shulchan Aruch (, literally: "Set Table"), sometimes dubbed in English as the Code of Jewish Law, is the most widely consulted of the various legal codes in Judaism.

Israel

State of IsraelIsraeliISR
It was authored in Safed (today in Israel) by Joseph Karo in 1563 and published in Venice two years later.

Venice

VenetianVenice, ItalyVenezia
It was authored in Safed (today in Israel) by Joseph Karo in 1563 and published in Venice two years later.

Jacob ben Asher

Baal HaTurimBaal Ha-TurimJacob b. Asher
The Shulchan Aruch (and its forerunner, the Beit Yosef) follow the same structure as Arba'ah Turim by Rabbi Jacob ben Asher.

Jewish views on marriage

marriageJewish view of marriageJewish marriage