Shunga Empire

ShungaShunga dynastyShungasSungaSungasSunga EmpireShunga periodSunga periodShunga EmperorSunga dynasty
The Shunga Empire (IAST:) was an ancient Indian dynasty from Magadha that controlled areas of the central and eastern Indian subcontinent from around 187 to 78 BCE.wikipedia
244 Related Articles

Bhagabhadra

Its capital was Pataliputra, but later emperors such as Bhagabhadra also held court at Besnagar (modern Vidisha) in eastern Malwa.
Bhagabhadra was one of the kings of the Indian Shunga dynasty.

Agnimitra

King Agnimitra
Pushyamitra Shunga ruled for 36 years and was succeeded by his son Agnimitra.
149 – 141 BCE)) was the second king of the Shunga dynasty of northern India.

Vidisha

BhilsaBesnagarVidisa
Its capital was Pataliputra, but later emperors such as Bhagabhadra also held court at Besnagar (modern Vidisha) in eastern Malwa.
The town of Besnagar, 3 km from present-day Vidisha on the west side of the river, became an important trade centre in the 6th and 5th centuries BCE, under the Shungas, Nagas, Satavahanas, and Guptas, and was mentioned in the Pali scriptures.

Sanchi

Sanchi StupaBuddhist Monuments at SanchiGreat Stupa
Art, education, philosophy, and other forms of learning flowered during this period including small terracotta images, larger stone sculptures, and architectural monuments such as the stupa at Bharhut, and the renowned Great Stupa at Sanchi.
During the following centuries, especially under the Shungas and the Satavahanas, the Great Stupa was enlarged and decorated with gates and railings, and smaller stupas were also built in the vicinity, especially Stupa No.2, and Stupa No.3.

Kanva dynasty

KanvaKanva EmpireKanvas
The Shunga dynasty was then replaced by the subsequent Kanvas.
The Kanva dynasty or Kanvayana was a Brahmin dynasty that replaced the Shunga dynasty in parts of eastern and central India, and ruled from 75 BCE to 30 BCE.

Devabhuti

The last of the Shunga emperors was Devabhuti (83–73 BCE).
83 – 73 BCE)) also known as Devbhomi, was the last king of the Shunga Empire in ancient India.

Brihadratha Maurya

BrihadrathaBrihadrataBrhadrata
The Shunga dynasty was a Brahmin dynasty, established in 185 BCE, about 50 years after Ashoka's death, when the emperor Brihadratha Maurya, the last ruler of the Maurya Empire, was assassinated by his Senānī or commander-in-chief, Pushyamitra Shunga, while he was reviewing the Guard of Honour of his forces.
187. He was killed by his general, Pushyamitra Shunga, who went on to establish the Shunga Empire.

Pataliputra

PatliputraPāṭaliputraPushpapura
Its capital was Pataliputra, but later emperors such as Bhagabhadra also held court at Besnagar (modern Vidisha) in eastern Malwa.
Its central location in north eastern India led rulers of successive dynasties to base their administrative capital here, from the Nandas, Mauryans, Shungas and the Guptas down to the Palas.

Magadha

MagadhMagadha KingdomMagadhas
The Shunga Empire (IAST:) was an ancient Indian dynasty from Magadha that controlled areas of the central and eastern Indian subcontinent from around 187 to 78 BCE.
Later, the Mauryan Empire ended, as did the Shunga and Khārabēḷa empires, to be replaced by the Gupta Empire.

Ujjain

UjjayiniUjjainiUjjayani
They may also have controlled the city of Ujjain.
After the Mauryans, Ujjain was controlled by a number of empires and dynasties, including local dynasties, the Shungas, the Western Satraps, the Satavahanas, and the Guptas.

Mitra dynasty

Mitras of MathuraMitraMitra dynasties
They fought the Kalinga, the Satavahana dynasty, the Indo-Greek Kingdom and possibly the Panchalas and Mitras of Mathura.
The control of Mathura seems to have continued for some time under the successors of Menander, with Strato I, Antimachus and Apollodotus II, where they were facing the territory of the Sungas.

Mahabodhi Temple

MahabodhiMahabodhi Temple Complex at Bodh GayaMaha Bodhi Temple
Representations of the early temple structure meant to protect the Bodhi tree are found at Sanchi, on the toraṇas of Stūpa I, dating from around 25 BCE, and on a relief carving from the stupa railing at Bhārhut, from the early Shunga period (c.

Pushyamitra Shunga

PushyamitraPushyamitra SungaPushyamitra of Sangha
The Shunga dynasty was a Brahmin dynasty, established in 185 BCE, about 50 years after Ashoka's death, when the emperor Brihadratha Maurya, the last ruler of the Maurya Empire, was assassinated by his Senānī or commander-in-chief, Pushyamitra Shunga, while he was reviewing the Guard of Honour of his forces. The dynasty was established by Pushyamitra Shunga, after the fall of the Maurya Empire. An account of a direct battle between the Greeks and the Shunga is also found in the Mālavikāgnimitram, a play by Kālidāsa which describes a battle between a squadron of Greek cavalrymen and Vasumitra, the grandson of Pushyamitra, accompanied by a hundred soldiers on the "Sindhu river", in which the Indians defeated a squadron of Greeks and Pushyamitra successfully completed the Ashvamedha Yagna.
185) was the founder and first ruler of the Shunga Empire in East India.

Vasumitra

An account of a direct battle between the Greeks and the Shunga is also found in the Mālavikāgnimitram, a play by Kālidāsa which describes a battle between a squadron of Greek cavalrymen and Vasumitra, the grandson of Pushyamitra, accompanied by a hundred soldiers on the "Sindhu river", in which the Indians defeated a squadron of Greeks and Pushyamitra successfully completed the Ashvamedha Yagna.
131 – 124 BCE); died 124 BCE), was the fourth ruler of the Shunga Empire of North India.

Demetrius I of Bactria

DemetriusDemetrius IDemetrius of Bactria
From around 180 BCE the Greco-Bactrian ruler Demetrius conquered the Kabul Valley and is theorised to have advanced into the trans-Indus to confront the Shungas.
Demetrius started the invasion of northwestern India in 180 BC, following the destruction of the Mauryan dynasty by the general Pushyamitra Shunga, who then founded the new Indian Shunga dynasty (185–78 BC).

Bodh Gaya

BodhgayaBuddha GayaBuddhagaya
The style of the Shunga period decorations at Sanchi bear a close similarity to those of Bharhut, as well as the peripheral balustrades at Bodh Gaya, which are thought to be the oldest of the three.
Representations of this early temple are found at Sanchi, on the toraṇas of Stūpa I, dating from around 25 BCE, and on a relief carving from the stupa railing at Bhārhut, from the early Shunga period (c.

Arjunayanas

Arjunayana
In the region of Mathura, the Arjunayanas and Yaudheyas mention military victories on their coins ("Victory of the Arjunayanas", "Victory of the Yaudheyas"), and during the 1st century BCE, the Trigartas, Audumbaras and finally the Kunindas also started to mint their own coins, thus affirming independence from the Indo-Greeks, although the style of their coins was often derived from that of the Indo-Greeks.
They emerged as a political power during the Shunga period (c.

Sagala

SakalaSangalaSāgala
Some ancient sources however claim a greater extent for the Shunga Empire: the Asokavadana account of the Divyavadana claims that the Shungas sent an army to persecute Buddhist monks as far as Sakala (Sialkot) in the Punjab region in the northwest:

Mathura

MuttraMathurāMathura, Uttar Pradesh
However, the city of Mathura further west never seems to have been under the direct control of the Shungas, as no archaeological evidence of a Shunga presence has ever been found in Mathura.
It seems it never was under the direct control of the following Shunga dynasty (2nd century BCE) as not a single archaeological remain of a Shunga presence were ever found in Mathura.

Yaudheya

YaudheyasYaudheya Republic
In the region of Mathura, the Arjunayanas and Yaudheyas mention military victories on their coins ("Victory of the Arjunayanas", "Victory of the Yaudheyas"), and during the 1st century BCE, the Trigartas, Audumbaras and finally the Kunindas also started to mint their own coins, thus affirming independence from the Indo-Greeks, although the style of their coins was often derived from that of the Indo-Greeks.
They not only survived the Maurya Empire and Shunga Empire, but also the Kshatraps and Kushan Empire.

Mālavikāgnimitram

MalavikagnimitraMālavikāgnimitraMalavikagnimitram
An account of a direct battle between the Greeks and the Shunga is also found in the Mālavikāgnimitram, a play by Kālidāsa which describes a battle between a squadron of Greek cavalrymen and Vasumitra, the grandson of Pushyamitra, accompanied by a hundred soldiers on the "Sindhu river", in which the Indians defeated a squadron of Greeks and Pushyamitra successfully completed the Ashvamedha Yagna. Also, the Malavikagnimitra claims that the empire of Pushyamitra extended to the Narmada River in the south.
The play tells the story of the love of [Agnimitra], the Shunga Emperor at Vidisha, for the beautiful lun-maiden of his chief queen.

Yuga Purana

Garga Samhita
Several works, such as the Mahabharata and the Yuga Purana describe the conflict between the Shungas and the Indo-Greeks.
It includes mythology, but also chronicles the Magadha empire, Maurya emperor Shalishuka, the Shunga dynasty the Yavanas, and Sakas.

Bharhut

BhārhutBarhutBharhut stupa
Art, education, philosophy, and other forms of learning flowered during this period including small terracotta images, larger stone sculptures, and architectural monuments such as the stupa at Bharhut, and the renowned Great Stupa at Sanchi. The style of the Shunga period decorations at Sanchi bear a close similarity to those of Bharhut, as well as the peripheral balustrades at Bodh Gaya, which are thought to be the oldest of the three.
Some recent reevaluations have tended to uncouple Bharhut from the Sunga period, and rather attribute the stupa to the 1st century CE, based on artistic similarities with better dated Mathura art and a questionning of the antiquity of the Bharhut inscriptions (particularly the Dhanabhuti inscriptions) suggested by traditional paleography.

Vasujyeshtha

141 – 131 BCE)) was the third king of the Shunga Dynasty of Northern India.

Ashvamedha

AshwamedhaAswamedhaAsvamedha
An account of a direct battle between the Greeks and the Shunga is also found in the Mālavikāgnimitram, a play by Kālidāsa which describes a battle between a squadron of Greek cavalrymen and Vasumitra, the grandson of Pushyamitra, accompanied by a hundred soldiers on the "Sindhu river", in which the Indians defeated a squadron of Greeks and Pushyamitra successfully completed the Ashvamedha Yagna.