Sibilant

sibilantssibilancesibilant consonantwhistled sibilantwhistledsibilation sibilant hisshisseshissing
In phonetics, sibilants are fricative consonants of higher amplitude and pitch, made by directing a stream of air with the tongue towards the teeth.wikipedia
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Fricative consonant

Fricativefricativesspirant
In phonetics, sibilants are fricative consonants of higher amplitude and pitch, made by directing a stream of air with the tongue towards the teeth.
A particular subset of fricatives are the sibilants.

Manner of articulation

articulationmanners of articulationspeech
In phonetics, sibilants are fricative consonants of higher amplitude and pitch, made by directing a stream of air with the tongue towards the teeth.
Others include those involved in the r-like sounds (taps and trills), and the sibilancy of fricatives.

Sulcalization

groovedsulcalizedsulcal
In the hissing sibilants and, the back of the tongue forms a narrow channel (is grooved) to focus the stream of air more intensely, resulting in a high pitch.
Sulcalization (from Latin sulcus, "groove"), in phonetics, is the pronunciation of a sound, typically a sibilant consonant, such as English and, with a deep groove running along the back of the tongue that focuses the airstream on the teeth, producing a more intense sound.

Tongue shape

domedconcaveDomed consonant
Because the sibilant sounds have such a high perceptual prominence, tongue shape is particularly important; small changes in tongue shape are easily audible and can be used to produce different speech sounds, even within a given language.

Phonetics

phoneticphoneticallyphonetician
In phonetics, sibilants are fricative consonants of higher amplitude and pitch, made by directing a stream of air with the tongue towards the teeth.
Sibilants are a special type of fricative where the turbulent airstream is directed towards the teeth, creating a high-pitched hissing sound.

Spanish language

SpanishSpanish-languageCastilian
Serbo-Croatian has alveolar, flat postalveolar and alveolo-palatal affricates whereas Basque has palato-alveolar and laminal and apical alveolar (apico-alveolar) fricatives and affricates (late Medieval peninsular Spanish and Portuguese had the same distinctions among fricatives).
In the 15th and 16th centuries, Spanish underwent a dramatic change in the pronunciation of its sibilant consonants, known in Spanish as the reajuste de las sibilantes, which resulted in the distinctive velar pronunciation of the letter and—in a large part of Spain—the characteristic interdental ("th-sound") for the letter (and for before or ).

Postalveolar consonant

PostalveolarPost- alveolarPost-alveolar
Sibilants can be made at any articulation, i.e. the tongue can contact the upper side of the mouth anywhere from the upper teeth to the hard palate, with the in-between articulations being denti-alveolar, and postalveolar.
There are many types of postalveolar sounds, especially among the sibilants.

Voiceless alveolo-palatal fricative

voiceless alveolo-palatal sibilantɕ hs ''' [ɕ
It is the sibilant equivalent of the voiceless palatal fricative.

Place of articulation

places of articulationarticulatedplace
The possible locations for sibilants as well as non-sibilants to occur are indicated in dashed red.

Voiced alveolo-palatal fricative

voiced alveolo-palatal sibilantvoiced alveolopalatal fricativevoiced palatalized postalveolar fricative
It is the sibilant equivalent of the voiced palatal fricative.

Retroflex consonant

Retroflexretroflexionretroflex consonants
Also, Ladefoged has resurrected an obsolete IPA symbol, the under dot, to indicate apical postalveolar (normally included in the category of retroflex consonants), and that notation is used here.
Finally, both sibilant ( or ) and nonsibilant consonants can have a retroflex articulation.

Palato-alveolar consonant

palato-alveolarPalato- alveolarpalatoalveolar
In phonetics, palato-alveolar (or palatoalveolar) consonants are postalveolar consonants, nearly always sibilants, that are weakly palatalized with a domed (bunched-up) tongue.

Phonological history of Spanish coronal fricatives

seseoceceodistinción
That occurs in southern Peninsular Spanish dialects of the "ceceo" type, which have replaced the former hissing fricative with, leaving only.
In the 15th century, Spanish had developed a large number of sibilant phonemes: seven by some accounts, eight by others (depending on whether and are considered contrasting)—in either case, more than any present-day variety of the language.

Toda language

TodatcxThovari
For example, a laminal denti-alveolar grooved sibilant occurs in Polish, and a subapical palatal retroflex sibilant occurs in Toda.

Alveolo-palatal consonant

alveolo-palatalAlveolo- palatalAlveopalatal
They are front enough that the fricatives and affricates are sibilants, the only sibilants among the dorsal consonants.

Tsonga language

TsongaXitsongaXichangana
Besides Shona, whistled sibilants have been reported as phonemes in Kalanga, Tsonga, Tshwa, Changana—all southern Bantu languages—and Tabasaran.
The latter are weakly whistled in both Tsonga proper and Changana dialect.

Tabasaran language

TabasaranTabassarantab
Besides Shona, whistled sibilants have been reported as phonemes in Kalanga, Tsonga, Tshwa, Changana—all southern Bantu languages—and Tabasaran.
The post-alveolar sibilants may be whistled.

Northwest Caucasian languages

Northwest CaucasianNorthwest Caucasian languageNorthwest
However, the palato-alveolar sibilants in the Northwest Caucasian languages such as Ubykh are an exception.These sounds have the tongue tip resting directly against the lower teeth, which gives the sounds a quality that Catford describes as "hissing-hushing".
There are pharyngealised consonants and a four-way place contrast among sibilants.

Labialization

labializedlab.labial
The whistled sibilants of Shona have been variously described—as labialized but not velarized, as retroflex, etc., but none of these features are required for the sounds.
However, their chief example is Shona sv and zv, which they transcribe and but which actually seem to be whistled sibilants, without necessarily being labialized.

Australian Aboriginal languages

Australian Aboriginal languageAboriginalAustralian Aboriginal
Examples include most Australian languages, and Rotokas, and what is generally reconstructed for Proto-Bantu.
In the few cases where fricatives do occur, they developed recently through the lenition (weakening) of stops, and are therefore non-sibilants like rather than sibilants like which are common elsewhere in the world.

Kalanga language

KalangaKarangaIkalanga
Besides Shona, whistled sibilants have been reported as phonemes in Kalanga, Tsonga, Tshwa, Changana—all southern Bantu languages—and Tabasaran.
It has an extensive phoneme inventory, which includes palatalised, velarised, aspirated and breathy-voiced consonants, as well as whistled sibilants.

Shona language

ShonaZezuruChiShona
However, they also occur phonemically in several southern Bantu languages, the best known being Shona.
Shona and other languages of Southern and Eastern Africa include whistling sounds, unlike most other languages where whistling signals a speech disorder (this should not be confused with whistled speech).

De-essing

de-esserdeeser
De-essing (also desibilizing) is any technique intended to reduce or eliminate the excessive prominence of sibilant consonants, such as the sounds normally represented in English by "s", "z", "ch", "j" and "sh", in recordings of the human voice.

Voiceless alveolar fricative

svoiceless alveolar sibilant s ''' [s
The first three types are sibilants, meaning that they are made with the teeth closed and have a piercing, perceptually prominent sound.

Voiced alveolar fricative

zvoiced alveolar sibilantVoiced apicoalveolar fricative