Siege of Boston

besieged Bostonevacuation of Bostonbesieged in BostonBostonsiege of the citysiege to Bostonthe British occupationunder siegeBattle of Bostonbesieged
The Siege of Boston (April 19, 1775 – March 17, 1776) was the opening phase of the American Revolutionary War.wikipedia
400 Related Articles

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican War of IndependenceAmerican Revolution
The Siege of Boston (April 19, 1775 – March 17, 1776) was the opening phase of the American Revolutionary War.
Militia forces then besieged Boston, forcing a British evacuation in March 1776, and Congress appointed George Washington to command the Continental Army.

Boston

Boston, MassachusettsBoston, MABoston, United States
New England militiamen prevented the movement by land of the British Army, which was garrisoned in what was then the peninsular city of Boston, Massachusetts Bay.
It was the scene of several key events of the American Revolution, such as the Boston Massacre, the Boston Tea Party, the Battle of Bunker Hill, and the Siege of Boston.

New England

Southern New EnglandNorthern New EnglandNew England region
New England militiamen prevented the movement by land of the British Army, which was garrisoned in what was then the peninsular city of Boston, Massachusetts Bay.
The first battles of the war were fought in Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts, later leading to the Siege of Boston by continental troops.

Battle of Bunker Hill

Bunker HillBunker Hill DayBattle of Bunker's Hill
In June 1775, the British seized Bunker and Breed's Hills, from which the Continentals were preparing to bombard the city, but their casualties were heavy and their gains were insufficient to break the Continental Army's hold on land access to Boston.
The Battle of Bunker Hill was fought on June 17, 1775, during the Siege of Boston in the early stages of the American Revolutionary War.

Fortification of Dorchester Heights

Dorchester Heightsfortified Dorchester Heightsfortify Dorchester Heights
In March 1776, these artillery fortified Dorchester Heights (which overlooked Boston and its harbor), thereby threatening the British supply lifeline.
The Fortification of Dorchester Heights was a decisive action early in the American Revolutionary War that precipitated the end of the siege of Boston and the withdrawal of British troops from that city.

Battles of Lexington and Concord

Battle of LexingtonBattle of Lexington and ConcordLexington and Concord
The siege began on April 19 after the Battles of Lexington and Concord, when the militia from surrounding Massachusetts communities blocked land access to Boston. When British forces were sent to seize military supplies from the town of Concord on April 19, 1775, militia companies from surrounding towns opposed them in the Battles of Lexington and Concord.
The accumulated militias then blockaded the narrow land accesses to Charlestown and Boston, starting the Siege of Boston.

Capture of Fort Ticonderoga

captured Fort TiconderogaFort TiconderogaBattle of Crown Point
In November 1775, Washington sent the 25-year-old bookseller-turned-soldier Henry Knox to bring to Boston the heavy artillery that had been captured at Fort Ticonderoga.
The cannons and other armaments were later transported to Boston by Colonel Henry Knox and used to fortify Dorchester Heights and break the standoff at the Siege of Boston.

Henry Knox

General KnoxKnoxGeneral Henry Knox
In November 1775, Washington sent the 25-year-old bookseller-turned-soldier Henry Knox to bring to Boston the heavy artillery that had been captured at Fort Ticonderoga.
When the war broke out with the Battles of Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775, Knox and Lucy snuck out of Boston, and Knox joined the militia army besieging the city.

Noble train of artillery

Knox Expeditionan expeditionacquired heavy cannon
In a technically complex and demanding operation, Knox brought many cannons to the Boston area by January 1776.
Benedict Arnold was a militia leader from Connecticut who had arrived with his unit in support of the Siege of Boston; he proposed to the Massachusetts Committee of Safety that Fort Ticonderoga on Lake Champlain in the Province of New York be captured from its small British garrison.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
The Continental Congress formed the Continental Army from the militia, with George Washington as its Commander in Chief.
The American Revolutionary War began on April 19, 1775 with the Battles of Lexington and Concord and the Siege of Boston.

Massachusetts Provincial Congress

Provincial CongressMassachusettsProvincial Congress of Massachusetts
It was reformed into the Provincial Congress, and continued to meet.
After the war began, the provincial congress established a number of committees to manage the rebel activity in the province, starting with the need to supply and arm the nascent Continental Army that besieged Boston after the April 1775 Battles of Lexington and Concord.

Continental Army

ContinentalContinental soldiersContinentals
The Continental Congress formed the Continental Army from the militia, with George Washington as its Commander in Chief.
At the time of the Siege of Boston, the Continental Army at Cambridge, Massachusetts, in June 1775, is estimated to have numbered from 14–16,000 men from New England (though the actual number may have been as low as 11,000 because of desertions).

Chelsea, Massachusetts

ChelseaChelsea, MAChelsea (city)
Immediately after the battles of April 19, the Massachusetts militia, under the loose leadership of William Heath, who was superseded by General Artemas Ward late on the 20th, formed a siege line extending from Chelsea, around the peninsulas of Boston and Charlestown, to Roxbury, effectively surrounding Boston on three sides.
Part of George Washington's army was stationed in Chelsea during the Siege of Boston.

William Howe, 5th Viscount Howe

William HoweSir William HoweGeneral Howe
The British commander William Howe saw the British position as indefensible and withdrew the British forces in Boston to the British stronghold at Halifax, Nova Scotia, on March 17.
He led a force of 4,000 troops sent to reinforce the 5,000 troops under General Thomas Gage who were besieged in the city after those battles.

Loyalist (American Revolution)

LoyalistLoyalistsTories
Many Loyalists who lived outside the city of Boston left their homes and fled into the city.
In the opening months of the Revolutionary War, the Patriots laid siege to Boston, where most of the British forces were stationed.

Concord, Massachusetts

ConcordConcord, MATown of Concord
When British forces were sent to seize military supplies from the town of Concord on April 19, 1775, militia companies from surrounding towns opposed them in the Battles of Lexington and Concord.
Subsequently, militia arriving from across the region harried the British troops on their return to Boston, culminating in the Siege of Boston and the outbreak of the war.

Province of Massachusetts Bay

MassachusettsMassachusetts BayProvince of Massachusetts
New England militiamen prevented the movement by land of the British Army, which was garrisoned in what was then the peninsular city of Boston, Massachusetts Bay. In response to the Boston Tea Party and other acts of protest, 4,000 British troops under the command of General Thomas Gage were sent to occupy Boston and to pacify the restive Province of Massachusetts Bay.
War finally erupted in April 1775 at Lexington and Concord, which started the American Revolutionary War and the Siege of Boston.

William Heath

HeathGen. HeathGeneral Heath
Immediately after the battles of April 19, the Massachusetts militia, under the loose leadership of William Heath, who was superseded by General Artemas Ward late on the 20th, formed a siege line extending from Chelsea, around the peninsulas of Boston and Charlestown, to Roxbury, effectively surrounding Boston on three sides.
As the siege of Boston began, Heath devoted himself to training the militia involved in the siege.

Artemas Ward

Ward7th District reissued in 1795General Artemas Ward
Immediately after the battles of April 19, the Massachusetts militia, under the loose leadership of William Heath, who was superseded by General Artemas Ward late on the 20th, formed a siege line extending from Chelsea, around the peninsulas of Boston and Charlestown, to Roxbury, effectively surrounding Boston on three sides.
Following the Battle of Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775, the rebels followed the British back to Boston and started the siege of the city.

Benedict Arnold

ArnoldBenedictGen. Benedict Arnold
On May 3, the Massachusetts Provincial Congress authorized Benedict Arnold to raise forces for taking Fort Ticonderoga near the southern end of Lake Champlain in the Province of New York, which was known to have heavy weapons, but to be only lightly defended.
His company marched northeast the following month to assist in the siege of Boston that followed the Battles of Lexington and Concord.

Dorchester Heights

Dorchester Heights MonumentDorchester Heights National Historic Siteheights of Dorchester
The town of Charlestown itself was entirely vacant, and the high lands of Charlestown (Bunker Hill and Breed's Hill) were left undefended, as were the heights of Dorchester, which had a commanding view of the harbor and the city.
Following this encounter, the Continental Congress in Philadelphia gave George Washington the title of commander-in-chief and sent him to oversee the Siege of Boston.

Battle of Chelsea Creek

Chelsea Creekclashedcontested action
On May 27, in the Battle of Chelsea Creek, the British Marines attempted to stop removal of livestock from some of the islands.
The American colonists met their goal of strengthening the siege of Boston by removing livestock and hay on those islands from the reach of the British regulars.

Longfellow House–Washington's Headquarters National Historic Site

Craigie HouseLongfellow HouseHenry Wadsworth Longfellow's house
On July 16, he moved his headquarters to the John Vassall House, also in Cambridge, that would later become well known as the home of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.
George Washington occupied it as his headquarters beginning on July 16, 1775, and it served as his base of operations during the Siege of Boston until he moved out on April 4, 1776.

Thomas Gage

General Thomas GageGeneral GageGage
In response to the Boston Tea Party and other acts of protest, 4,000 British troops under the command of General Thomas Gage were sent to occupy Boston and to pacify the restive Province of Massachusetts Bay.
Following Lexington and Concord, thousands of colonial militia surrounded the city, beginning the Siege of Boston.

Roxbury, Boston

RoxburyRoxbury, MassachusettsRoxbury, MA
Immediately after the battles of April 19, the Massachusetts militia, under the loose leadership of William Heath, who was superseded by General Artemas Ward late on the 20th, formed a siege line extending from Chelsea, around the peninsulas of Boston and Charlestown, to Roxbury, effectively surrounding Boston on three sides.