Siege of Fort St. Jean

Battle of Fort St. Jeanbesieging Fort Saint-Jeanbattle of St. Johnsbesiege Fort Saint-Jeanbesiege Fort St. Jeanbesiege the fortressbesieged the fortbesieging Fort St. Jeanbesieging Fort St. Johnschanged hands
The Siege of Fort St. Jean (also called St. John, St. Johns, or St. John's) was conducted by American Brigadier General Richard Montgomery on the town and fort of Saint-Jean in the British province of Quebec during the American Revolutionary War.wikipedia
93 Related Articles

Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu

Saint-JeanSaint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, QuebecSt. Johns
The Siege of Fort St. Jean (also called St. John, St. Johns, or St. John's) was conducted by American Brigadier General Richard Montgomery on the town and fort of Saint-Jean in the British province of Quebec during the American Revolutionary War.
During the American Revolutionary War control of the town changed hands several times as British and American forces moved through the area.

Invasion of Quebec (1775)

invasion of Canadainvasion of QuebecInvasion of Canada (1775)
The invasion of Quebec began when about 1500 men, then under the command of General Philip Schuyler, arrived at the undefended Île-aux-Noix in the Richelieu River on September 4, 1775.
Montgomery's expedition set out from Fort Ticonderoga in late August, and in mid-September began besieging Fort St. Johns, the main defensive point south of Montreal.

Fort Saint-Jean (Quebec)

Fort Saint-JeanCFB Saint-JeanASU Saint-Jean
The Siege of Fort St. Jean (also called St. John, St. Johns, or St. John's) was conducted by American Brigadier General Richard Montgomery on the town and fort of Saint-Jean in the British province of Quebec during the American Revolutionary War. When Benedict Arnold and Ethan Allen captured Fort Ticonderoga and raided Fort St. Jean in May 1775, Quebec was garrisoned by about 600 regular troops, some of which were widely distributed throughout Quebec's large territory. Fort Saint-Jean guarded the entry to the province of Quebec on the Richelieu River at the northern end of Lake Champlain.
The siege of Fort Saint-Jean considerably weakened and slowed the American offensive: Montgomery's expedition arrived at Quebec City early in December instead of mid-October, and only three hundred of his men, out of about two thousand, actually reached Quebec City.

Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester

Guy CarletonSir Guy CarletonLord Dorchester
Beset by illness, bad weather, and logistical problems, they established mortar batteries that were able to penetrate into the interior of the fort, but the defenders, who were well-supplied with munitions, but not food and other supplies, persisted in their defence, believing the siege would be broken by forces from Montreal under General Guy Carleton. When Moses Hazen, the messenger bearing news of Arnold's raid, reached Quebec City and notified British Governor and General Guy Carleton of the raid, Carleton immediately dispatched additional troops from there and Trois-Rivières to St. Jean.
In September, the Continental Army began its invasion and besieged the fort.

Ethan Allen

ALLEN, Colonel EthanAllen, EthanEthan Allen, spy
When Benedict Arnold and Ethan Allen captured Fort Ticonderoga and raided Fort St. Jean in May 1775, Quebec was garrisoned by about 600 regular troops, some of which were widely distributed throughout Quebec's large territory.
On September 4, the army had occupied the Île aux Noix in the Richelieu River, a few miles above Fort St. John, which they then prepared to besiege.

84th Regiment of Foot (Royal Highland Emigrants)

Royal Highland Emigrants84th Regiment of Foot84th Regiment
There were 90 locally raised militia, and 20 members of Colonel Allen Maclean's Royal Highland Emigrants, men who were veterans of the French and Indian War.
It marched from Quebec in an attempt to repel Brigadier General Richard Montgomery's invasion in the Siege of Fort St. Jean, Quebec.

26th (Cameronian) Regiment of Foot

26th Foot26th Regiment of FootCameronian regiment
The majority of these were regular troops from the 7th and 26th Regiments of Foot and the Royal Artillery.
The Americans, under General Richard Montgomery, had meanwhile led a strong force against Saint-Jean, and began to besiege the fortress in September.

Richard Montgomery

MontgomeryGeneral MontgomeryGeneral Richard Montgomery
The Siege of Fort St. Jean (also called St. John, St. Johns, or St. John's) was conducted by American Brigadier General Richard Montgomery on the town and fort of Saint-Jean in the British province of Quebec during the American Revolutionary War.

Charles Preston

Sir Charles Preston, BtSir Charles Preston, 5th Baronet
When news of that raid reached Montreal, 140 men under the command of Major Charles Preston were immediately dispatched to hold the fort.
They held Fort St. Jean, at Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec, in 1775 when it came under siege by American General Richard Montgomery, and resisted multiple attacks by troops under command of Montgomery and Philip Schuyler.

Moses Hazen

General Hazen
When Moses Hazen, the messenger bearing news of Arnold's raid, reached Quebec City and notified British Governor and General Guy Carleton of the raid, Carleton immediately dispatched additional troops from there and Trois-Rivières to St. Jean.
On September 17, Brigadier General Richard Montgomery, now commanding the American forces, began to besiege Fort St. Jean.

David Wooster

General WoosterWoosterGeneral [David] Wooster
However, on September 8, reinforcements arrived: another 800 men including Connecticut militia under David Wooster and New Yorkers with artillery, joined them.
Wooster participated in the Siege of Fort St. Jean in the fall of 1775, and was then given military command of Montreal after that city fell in November.

Loyalist (American Revolution)

LoyalistLoyalistsTories
Some Loyalists attempted to dissuade others from joining with Livingston; Livingston's supporters sometimes violently opposed attempts by Loyalists to organize, and Carleton did nothing at the time to assist the Loyalists outside the city.
Although only a minority of Canadians openly expressed loyalty to King George, about 1,500 militia fought for the King in the Siege of Fort St. Jean.

Battle of Quebec (1775)

Battle of QuebecQuebecsiege of Quebec
He never found out; the news did not reach the American camp outside Quebec before he died in the December 31 Battle of Quebec.
Brigadier General Richard Montgomery led the force from Ticonderoga and Crown Point up Lake Champlain, successfully besieging Fort St. Jean, and capturing Montreal on November 13.

Battle of Longue-Pointe

a poorly-organized attempt to capture Montrealattempt on MontrealBattle of Longue Pointe
In the Battle of Longue-Pointe, this effort failed on the next day, with Allen and a number of men captured by the British.
Schuyler, who was ill at the time, eventually turned command of the army over to General Richard Montgomery, who ordered the army to besiege Fort Saint-Jean, which they did on September 18.

Timothy Bedel

The bad news was tempered by good; an additional 250 troops, in the form of a company of Green Mountain Boys under Seth Warner, and another company of New Hampshire men under Colonel Timothy Bedel, arrived at Île-aux-Noix.
Bedel saw action at the Siege of Fort St. Jean.

James Livingston (American Revolution)

James LivingstonCol. James Livingston
James Livingston, a local grain merchant (and a relative of Montgomery's wife), began raising a local militia near Chambly, eventually gathering nearly 300 men.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
The Siege of Fort St. Jean (also called St. John, St. Johns, or St. John's) was conducted by American Brigadier General Richard Montgomery on the town and fort of Saint-Jean in the British province of Quebec during the American Revolutionary War.

Province of Quebec (1763–1791)

Province of QuebecQuebecBritish Province of Quebec
The Siege of Fort St. Jean (also called St. John, St. Johns, or St. John's) was conducted by American Brigadier General Richard Montgomery on the town and fort of Saint-Jean in the British province of Quebec during the American Revolutionary War. Fort Saint-Jean guarded the entry to the province of Quebec on the Richelieu River at the northern end of Lake Champlain.

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican War of IndependenceAmerican Revolution
The Siege of Fort St. Jean (also called St. John, St. Johns, or St. John's) was conducted by American Brigadier General Richard Montgomery on the town and fort of Saint-Jean in the British province of Quebec during the American Revolutionary War.

Siege

besiegedsiege warfarebesiege
The siege lasted from September 17 to November 3, 1775.

Continental Army

ContinentalContinental soldiersContinentals
After several false starts in early September, the Continental Army established a siege around Fort St. Jean.

Montreal

Montreal, QuebecMontréalMontreal, Canada
Beset by illness, bad weather, and logistical problems, they established mortar batteries that were able to penetrate into the interior of the fort, but the defenders, who were well-supplied with munitions, but not food and other supplies, persisted in their defence, believing the siege would be broken by forces from Montreal under General Guy Carleton.

Fort Chambly

Fort Chambly National Historic SiteChanbleeFort Saint Louis
On October 18, the nearby Fort Chambly fell, and on October 30, an attempt at relief by Carleton was thwarted.

Quebec City

QuebecQuebec City, QuebecQuébec City
When Moses Hazen, the messenger bearing news of Arnold's raid, reached Quebec City and notified British Governor and General Guy Carleton of the raid, Carleton immediately dispatched additional troops from there and Trois-Rivières to St. Jean. General Carleton escaped from Montreal, and made his way to Quebec City to prepare its defences against an anticipated attack.

Richelieu River

RichelieuRichelieu ValleyRiviere Richelieu
Fort Saint-Jean guarded the entry to the province of Quebec on the Richelieu River at the northern end of Lake Champlain.