Siege of Jerusalem (597 BC)

Siege of Jerusalemfirst siege to Jerusalemsiegesiege to Jerusalemattacked JerusalemBabylonian invasionBabylonians destroyedbesiegedcapture of Jerusalemdestruction of Jerusalem
The Siege of Jerusalem was a military campaign carried out by Nebuchadnezzar II, king of Babylon in 597 BC.wikipedia
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Zedekiah

King ZedekiahHamutalMattaniah
According to the Nebuchadnezzar Chronicle, King Jehoiakim of Judah rebelled against Babylonian rule, but Nebuchadnezzar captured the city and installed Zedekiah as ruler.
Zedekiah had been installed as king of Judah by Nebuchadnezzar II, king of Babylon, after a siege of Jerusalem in 597 BC, to succeed his nephew, Jeconiah, who was overthrown as king after a reign of only three months and ten days.

Nebuchadnezzar Chronicle

According to the Nebuchadnezzar Chronicle, King Jehoiakim of Judah rebelled against Babylonian rule, but Nebuchadnezzar captured the city and installed Zedekiah as ruler. According to the Nebuchadnezzar Chronicle, he laid siege to Jerusalem, which eventually fell on 2 Adar (March 16) 597 BC.
The tablet details Nebuchadnezzar's military campaigns in the west and has been interpreted to refer to both the Battle of Carchemish and the Siege of Jerusalem (597 BC).

Jehoiakim

ZebudahEliakimKing Jehoiakim
According to the Nebuchadnezzar Chronicle, King Jehoiakim of Judah rebelled against Babylonian rule, but Nebuchadnezzar captured the city and installed Zedekiah as ruler. To avoid the destruction of Jerusalem, King Jehoiakim of Judah, in his third year, changed allegiances from Egypt to Babylon.
In late 598 BC, the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar II invaded Judah and again laid siege to Jerusalem, which lasted three months.

Kingdom of Judah

Judahking of JudahHouse of Judah
In 605 BC, he defeated Pharaoh Necho at the Battle of Carchemish, and subsequently invaded Judah. The failure led to numerous rebellions among the states of the Levant which owed allegiance to Babylon, including Judah, where King Jehoiakim stopped paying tribute to Nebuchadnezzar and took a pro-Egyptian position.
According to the Babylonian Chronicles, after invading "the land of Hatti (Syria/Palestine)" in 599 BCE, he lay siege to Jerusalem.

Babylonian captivity

Babylonian exileexileexile in Babylon
Nebuchadnezzar pillaged the city and its Temple, and the new king Jeconiah, who was either 8 or 18, and his court and other prominent citizens and craftsmen, and much of the Jewish population of Judah, numbering about 10,000 were deported to Babylon.
After Nebuchadnezzar was defeated in battle in 601 BCE by Egypt, Judah revolted against Babylon, culminating in a three-month siege of Jerusalem beginning in late 598 BCE.

Kings of Judah

King of JudahJudahKing
To avoid the destruction of Jerusalem, King Jehoiakim of Judah, in his third year, changed allegiances from Egypt to Babylon.
The Babylonian Chronicles give 2 Adar (16 March), 597 BC, as the date that Nebuchadnezzar first captured Jerusalem, thus putting an end to the reign of Jehoaichin.

Jewish–Babylonian war

conquered
Nebuchadnezzar besieged Jerusalem in 597 BC, and managed to capture the city and king Jehoiachin, along with all of the aristocracy of Jerusalem.

Jeconiah

JehoiachinConiahJechonias
Nebuchadnezzar pillaged the city and its Temple, and the new king Jeconiah, who was either 8 or 18, and his court and other prominent citizens and craftsmen, and much of the Jewish population of Judah, numbering about 10,000 were deported to Babylon.

Donald Wiseman

Donald J. WisemanD. J. WisemanDJ Wiseman
The Babylonian Chronicles, which were published by Donald Wiseman in 1956, establish that Nebuchadnezzar captured Jerusalem the first time on 2 Adar (16 March) 597 BC.
From his work on Babylonian texts, Wiseman established the date of Nebuchadnezzar's first capture of Jerusalem as 15/16 March 597 BC.

Nebuchadnezzar II

NebuchadnezzarNebuchadrezzar IIKing Nebuchadnezzar
The Babylonian Chronicles, which were published by Donald Wiseman in 1956, establish that Nebuchadnezzar captured Jerusalem the first time on 2 Adar (16 March) 597 BC. The Siege of Jerusalem was a military campaign carried out by Nebuchadnezzar II, king of Babylon in 597 BC.

Babylon

BabilBabelAncient Babylon
The Siege of Jerusalem was a military campaign carried out by Nebuchadnezzar II, king of Babylon in 597 BC.

Necho II

NechoPharaoh NechoPharaoh Necho II
In 605 BC, he defeated Pharaoh Necho at the Battle of Carchemish, and subsequently invaded Judah.

Battle of Carchemish

CarchemishBattle of Charchameshdefeated the Assyrians at Carchemish
In 605 BC, he defeated Pharaoh Necho at the Battle of Carchemish, and subsequently invaded Judah.

Late Period of ancient Egypt

Late PeriodEgyptLate Dynastic
In 601 BC, during the fourth year of his reign, Nebuchadnezzar unsuccessfully attempted to invade Egypt and was repulsed with heavy losses.

Levant

the LevantLevantineNear East
The failure led to numerous rebellions among the states of the Levant which owed allegiance to Babylon, including Judah, where King Jehoiakim stopped paying tribute to Nebuchadnezzar and took a pro-Egyptian position.

Jerusalem

Jerusalem, IsraelAl-QudsQuds
According to the Nebuchadnezzar Chronicle, he laid siege to Jerusalem, which eventually fell on 2 Adar (March 16) 597 BC.

Adar

Adar IAdar IIAdar 2
According to the Nebuchadnezzar Chronicle, he laid siege to Jerusalem, which eventually fell on 2 Adar (March 16) 597 BC.

Cheshvan

MarcheshvanHeshvanBul
Jehoiakim died during the siege, possibly on 22 Marcheshvan (December 10) 598 BC, or during the months of Kislev, or Tevet.

Kislev

ChislevChisleuChisleu (Kislev)
Jehoiakim died during the siege, possibly on 22 Marcheshvan (December 10) 598 BC, or during the months of Kislev, or Tevet.

Tevet

TevesTebethTebet
Jehoiakim died during the siege, possibly on 22 Marcheshvan (December 10) 598 BC, or during the months of Kislev, or Tevet.

Temple in Jerusalem

TempleTemple of JerusalemHoly Temple
Nebuchadnezzar pillaged the city and its Temple, and the new king Jeconiah, who was either 8 or 18, and his court and other prominent citizens and craftsmen, and much of the Jewish population of Judah, numbering about 10,000 were deported to Babylon.

Book of Ezekiel

EzekielEzek.Yekhezqel
The deportation occurred prior to Nisan of 597 BC, and dates in the Book of Ezekiel are counted from that event.

Solomon

King SolomonSalomonSchlomo
Also, taken to Babylon were the treasures and furnishings of the Temple, including golden vessels dedicated by King Solomon.

Nevi'im

Books of the ProphetsProphetsBook of the Prophets
The events are described in the Nevi'im and Ketuvim sections of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible, also known as the Old Testament).

Ketuvim

WritingsHagiographaKetuvim ("Writings")
The events are described in the Nevi'im and Ketuvim sections of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible, also known as the Old Testament).