Siege of Petersburg

PetersburgRichmond-Petersburg CampaignBattle of PetersburgPetersburg CampaignPetersburg, VirginiaRichmond–Petersburg CampaignPetersburg SiegeSiege of Petersburg, VirginiaSiege of Richmonddefense of Petersburg
The Richmond–Petersburg campaign was a series of battles around Petersburg, Virginia, fought from June 15, 1864, to April 2, 1865, during the American Civil War.wikipedia
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Ulysses S. Grant

Ulysses GrantGrantPresident Grant
The campaign consisted of nine months of trench warfare in which Union forces commanded by Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant assaulted Petersburg unsuccessfully and then constructed trench lines that eventually extended over 30 mi from the eastern outskirts of Richmond, Virginia, to around the eastern and southern outskirts of Petersburg.
For thirteen months, Grant fought Robert E. Lee during the high casualty Overland Campaign and at Petersburg.

Trench warfare

trenchestrenchentrenchment
The campaign consisted of nine months of trench warfare in which Union forces commanded by Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant assaulted Petersburg unsuccessfully and then constructed trench lines that eventually extended over 30 mi from the eastern outskirts of Richmond, Virginia, to around the eastern and southern outskirts of Petersburg.
North American armies employed field works in the American Civil War (1861–1865) — most notably in the sieges of Vicksburg (1863) and Petersburg (1864–1865), the latter of which saw the first use by the Union Army of the rapid-fire Gatling gun, the important precursor to modern-day machine guns.

Petersburg, Virginia

PetersburgPetersburg CityPetersburg, VA
The Richmond–Petersburg campaign was a series of battles around Petersburg, Virginia, fought from June 15, 1864, to April 2, 1865, during the American Civil War.
Nine months of trench warfare were conducted by Union forces during the 1864–65 Siege of Petersburg.

Battle of Chaffin's Farm

Chaffin's FarmBattle of New Market HeightsBattle of Chapin's Farm
It also featured the war's largest concentration of African-American troops, who suffered heavy casualties at such engagements as the Battle of the Crater and Chaffin's Farm.
The Battle of Chaffin's Farm and New Market Heights, also known as Laurel Hill and combats at Forts Harrison, Johnson, and Gilmer, was fought in Virginia on September 29–30, 1864, as part of the Siege of Petersburg in the American Civil War.

Appomattox campaign

AppomattoxretreatAppomattox Court House
Lee finally gave in to the pressure and abandoned both cities in April 1865, leading to his retreat and surrender at Appomattox Court House.
As the Richmond–Petersburg campaign (also known as the siege of Petersburg) ended, Lee's army was outnumbered and exhausted from a winter of trench warfare over an approximately 40 mi front, numerous battles, disease, hunger and desertion.

American Civil War

Civil WarU.S. Civil WarUnited States Civil War
The Richmond–Petersburg campaign was a series of battles around Petersburg, Virginia, fought from June 15, 1864, to April 2, 1865, during the American Civil War.
The last significant battles raged around the Siege of Petersburg.

Battle of the Crater

Mine ExplosionThe CraterCrater
It also featured the war's largest concentration of African-American troops, who suffered heavy casualties at such engagements as the Battle of the Crater and Chaffin's Farm.
The Battle of the Crater was a battle of the American Civil War, part of the Siege of Petersburg.

Battle of Appomattox Court House

AppomattoxAppomattox Court HouseBattle of Appomattox Courthouse
Lee finally gave in to the pressure and abandoned both cities in April 1865, leading to his retreat and surrender at Appomattox Court House.
Lee, having abandoned the Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia, after the nine and one-half month Siege of Petersburg and Richmond, retreated west, hoping to join his army with the remaining Confederate forces in North Carolina, the Army of Tennessee under Gen. Joseph E. Johnston.

Overland Campaign

Wilderness CampaignGrant's Overland CampaignWilderness
On May 4, Grant and Meade's Army of the Potomac crossed the Rapidan River and entered the area known as the Wilderness of Spotsylvania, beginning the six-week Overland Campaign.
The resulting Siege of Petersburg (June 1864 – March 1865) led to the eventual surrender of Lee's army in April 1865 and the effective end of the Civil War.

Battle of Cold Harbor

Cold HarborBattles about Cold HarborCold Harbor (June 1–3, 1864)
This theory was tested at the Battle of Cold Harbor (May 31 – June 12) when Grant's army once again came into contact with Lee's near Mechanicsville.
In the final stage, he entrenched himself within besieged Petersburg before finally fleeing westward across Virginia.

Union Army

UnionUnion troopsUnion forces
The campaign consisted of nine months of trench warfare in which Union forces commanded by Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant assaulted Petersburg unsuccessfully and then constructed trench lines that eventually extended over 30 mi from the eastern outskirts of Richmond, Virginia, to around the eastern and southern outskirts of Petersburg.
Grant laid siege to Lee's army at Petersburg, Virginia, and eventually captured Richmond, the capital of the Confederacy.

City Point, Virginia

City PointBermuda CittieCity Point, VA
Grant made his headquarters in a cabin on the lawn of Appomattox Manor, the home of Dr. Richard Eppes and the oldest home (built in 1763) in what was then City Point, but is now Hopewell, Virginia.
It served as headquarters of the Union Army during the Siege of Petersburg during the American Civil War.

Appomattox Manor

Appomattox PlantationAppomattox
Grant made his headquarters in a cabin on the lawn of Appomattox Manor, the home of Dr. Richard Eppes and the oldest home (built in 1763) in what was then City Point, but is now Hopewell, Virginia.
It is best known as the Union headquarters during the Siege of Petersburg in 1864-65.

Hopewell, Virginia

HopewellHopewell CityCity of Hopewell
Grant made his headquarters in a cabin on the lawn of Appomattox Manor, the home of Dr. Richard Eppes and the oldest home (built in 1763) in what was then City Point, but is now Hopewell, Virginia.
During the American Civil War, Union General Ulysses S. Grant used City Point as his headquarters during the Siege of Petersburg in 1864 and 1865.

James River

JamesJames River, VirginiaJames River Group
On the night of June 12, Grant again advanced by his left flank, marching to the James River.
As the James River passed through the Confederate capital Richmond, it was the scene of much action in the Civil War, notably in the Peninsula Campaign, the Seven Days Battles and the Siege of Petersburg.

Richmond and Petersburg Railroad

Richmond & Petersburg RailroadRichmond & PetersburgRichmond-Petersburg Railroad
Numerous raids were conducted and battles fought in attempts to cut off the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad.
Towards the end of the war, Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant tried to cut off the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad, which was the supply line to Richmond, in the Siege of Petersburg.

Robert Sanford Foster

Robert S. FosterFosterFoster, Robert Sanford
He played a prominent role in the Siege of Petersburg and the Appomattox Campaign.

James H. Ledlie

James LedlieLedlieLedlie, James H.
Gen. James H. Ledlie's division, both failed.
He is best known for his dereliction of duty at the Battle of the Crater during the Siege of Petersburg.

Robert E. Lee

LeeGeneral Robert E. LeeGeneral Lee
Petersburg was crucial to the supply of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's army and the Confederate capital of Richmond.
The Siege of Petersburg lasted from June 1864 until March 1865, with Lee's outnumbered and poorly supplied army shrinking daily because of desertions by disheartened Confederates.

Political general

politicalpolitical rather than military reasonspolitical' major generals
Most of these initiatives failed, often because of the assignment of generals to Grant for political rather than military reasons.

Army of the James

the James
Butler's Army of the James bogged down against inferior forces under Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard before Richmond in the Bermuda Hundred Campaign.
The XVIII Corps also participated in the Siege of Petersburg.

Siege

besiegedsiege warfarebesiege
Although it is more popularly known as the siege of Petersburg, it was not a classic military siege, in which a city is usually surrounded and all supply lines are cut off, nor was it strictly limited to actions against Petersburg.
The Siege of Sevastopol during the Crimean War and the Siege of Petersburg (1864–1865) during the American Civil War showed that modern citadels, when improved by improvised defences, could still resist an enemy for many months.

Confederate States Army

ConfederateConfederate ArmyConfederates
Petersburg was crucial to the supply of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's army and the Confederate capital of Richmond.
During the Civil War 28,693 Native Americans served in the U.S. and Confederate armies, participating in battles such as Pea Ridge, Second Manassas, Antietam, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, and in Federal assaults on Petersburg.

First Corps, Army of Northern Virginia

First CorpsLongstreet's Corpscorps
In part or as a whole, the corps fought in nearly all of the major battles in the Eastern Theater, such as Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, The Wilderness, Cold Harbor, and the Siege of Petersburg.

James Longstreet

LongstreetLongstreet, JamesGeneral James Longstreet
He later returned to the field, serving under Lee in the Siege of Petersburg and the Appomattox Campaign.