Siege of Petersburg

The "Dictator" siege mortar at Petersburg. In the foreground, the figure on the right is Brig. Gen. Henry J. Hunt, chief of artillery of the Army of the Potomac.
Fredericksburg, Virginia; May 1863. Soldiers in the trenches. Trench warfare would appear again more infamously in World War I
A portion of the 4th USCT Infantry
Siege of Petersburg, assaults on June 15–18
Siege of Petersburg, movements against the railroads and A.P. Hill's counterattack, June 21–22
Wilson–Kautz Raid, June 22 – July 1
"Dictator" siege mortar on the U.S. Military Railroad at Petersburg
First Battle of Deep Bottom, July 27–29
Siege of Petersburg, Battle of the Crater, July 30
Sketch of the explosion seen from the Union line.
Second Battle of Deep Bottom, August 14–20
Siege of Petersburg, capture of the Weldon Railroad, August 18–19
Siege of Petersburg, actions on October 27
Siege of Petersburg, actions preceding Five Forks
Grant's final assaults and Lee's retreat (start of the Appomattox Campaign)
<center>Lt. Gen.
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<center>Brig. Gen. James H. Wilson</center>
<center>Brig. Gen. August Kautz</center>
Fascine Trench Breastworks, Petersburg, Va. – NARA – 524792. Although identified as Confederate Trenches this is actually Union Fort Sedgwick aka "Fort Hell" which was opposite Fort Mahone aka "Fort Damnation"<ref>Civil War talk Forum</ref>
Union Army 9th Corps attacking Fort Mahone aka "Fort Damanation" sketch by Alfred Ward.
Confederate artilleryman killed during the final Union assault against the trenches at Petersburg. Photo by Thomas C. Roche, April 3, 1865.<ref>Frassanito, p. 360.</ref><ref>See website Petersburg Project on location of Many of the Roche photographs at Petersburg April 1865</ref> Although prints of this picture list it as being taken at Ft Mahone, historians at the "Petersburg Project" believe it was taken at Confederate Battery 25<ref>Dead Artilleryman comments Petersburg Project</ref>
Smoke is still rising from the ruins of Richmond, Virginia after surrendering on April 3, 1865 following the Union victory at the siege of Petersburg. Union cavalry mounts with carbines visible are hitched in the foreground.

Series of battles around Petersburg, Virginia, fought from June 9, 1864, to March 25, 1865, during the American Civil War.

- Siege of Petersburg
The "Dictator" siege mortar at Petersburg. In the foreground, the figure on the right is Brig. Gen. Henry J. Hunt, chief of artillery of the Army of the Potomac.

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Ambrose R. Wright

Lawyer, Georgia politician, and Confederate general in the American Civil War.

Lawyer, Georgia politician, and Confederate general in the American Civil War.

Wright's Georgians made a distinguished record in the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days Battles to the Siege of Petersburg.

Henry A. Wise

American lawyer and politician from Virginia.

American lawyer and politician from Virginia.

Gen. Wise during the American Civil War.
Wise (top row, second from right) with Robert E. Lee and Confederate officers, cq1869.

Wise commanded a brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia during the final stages of the Siege of Petersburg.

The 4-star rank general George S. Patton in 1945, at the end of World War II

Political general

General officer or other military leader without significant military experience who is given a high position in command for political reasons, through political connections, or to appease certain political blocs and factions.

General officer or other military leader without significant military experience who is given a high position in command for political reasons, through political connections, or to appease certain political blocs and factions.

The 4-star rank general George S. Patton in 1945, at the end of World War II

Benjamin Franklin Butler, State Senator from Massachusetts and Brigadier General in the Massachusetts militia. He lost the war's first land battle at Big Bethel on July 1, 1861, and was later put in charge of the Department of the Gulf, governing the captured New Orleans with strict discipline (and earning the derogatory nickname "Spoons" for his alleged habit of pilfering from Confederate homes). He led the Army of the James during the failed Bermuda Hundred Campaign, the Siege of Petersburg, and at Fort Fisher. After the latter, he was relieved of his command. He was later elected Governor of Massachusetts.

Lewis A. Grant

Teacher, lawyer, soldier in the Union Army during the American Civil War, and later United States Assistant Secretary of War.

Teacher, lawyer, soldier in the Union Army during the American Civil War, and later United States Assistant Secretary of War.

As a brigade or acting division commander, he participated in the following: the Second Battle of Fredericksburg and the Battle of Salem Church, Gettysburg, Fairfield, Second Battle of Rappahannock Station, the Mine Run Campaign, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania Court House, Cold Harbor, Siege of Petersburg, Charlestown, West Virginia, Gilbert's Crossing, Cedar Creek, the siege and assault on Petersburg (where he was wounded in the head), and the Battle of Sayler's Creek during the Appomattox Campaign.

Robert Frederick Hoke photo taken in 1862

Robert Hoke

Confederate major general during the American Civil War.

Confederate major general during the American Civil War.

Robert Frederick Hoke photo taken in 1862
Hoke in later years

Wounded at Chancellorsville, he recovered in time for the defense of Petersburg and Richmond.

Orlando B. Willcox

Orlando B. Willcox

American soldier who served as a general in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

American soldier who served as a general in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Orlando B. Willcox

Following the Siege of Petersburg, he led the first troops to enter Petersburg, Virginia, before ending the war serving in North Carolina.

A map of the Union raiders' route

First Battle of Ream's Station

Fought on June 29, 1864, during the Wilson–Kautz Raid of the American Civil War.

Fought on June 29, 1864, during the Wilson–Kautz Raid of the American Civil War.

A map of the Union raiders' route
Map of Ream's Station Battlefield core and study areas by the American Battlefield Protection Program.

In June 1864, a Union division under the command of Brig. Gen. August V. Kautz moved into southern Virginia where they began destroying sections of the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad as part of the Richmond-Petersburg Campaign.

Union Brigadier General Edward A. Wild

Edward A. Wild

American homeopathic doctor and a brigadier general in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

American homeopathic doctor and a brigadier general in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Union Brigadier General Edward A. Wild
Wild in later years
A portrait of Wild taken sometime between the fall of 1862 and 1870.
Memorial plaque at Harvard University

Transferred to the Army of the Potomac in 1864, Wild and his black soldiers participated in the Overland Campaign and the subsequent Siege of Petersburg, Wild's men constructed and manned Fort Pocahontas, an earthen-walled Virginia fort on the James River that during the Battle of Wilson's Wharf withstood an attack on May 24 by Fitzhugh Lee's Confederates.

Clockwise from upper left: Brigadier General August V. Kautz, Brigadier General James H. Wilson, Confederate artillery firing across the river

Battle of Staunton River Bridge

Engagement on June 25, 1864, between Union and Confederate forces during Wilson-Kautz Raid of the American Civil War.

Engagement on June 25, 1864, between Union and Confederate forces during Wilson-Kautz Raid of the American Civil War.

Clockwise from upper left: Brigadier General August V. Kautz, Brigadier General James H. Wilson, Confederate artillery firing across the river
Wilson-Kautz Raid, June 22–July 1

During the month of June 1864, Confederate General Robert E. Lee was commanding the Army of Northern Virginia in the defense of Petersburg, Virginia, against the Union siege under the command of Union Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant.

A map of the Union raiders' route

Battle of Sappony Church

A map of the Union raiders' route
Map of Sappony Church Battlefield core and study areas by the American Battlefield Protection Program.

The Battle of Sappony Church, also known as the Battle of Stony Creek Depot, was an engagement of the American Civil War, between the Confederate States of America and the Union, which took place on June 28, 1864, during the Wilson-Kautz Raid of the Richmond–Petersburg Campaign.