A report on Siege of Petersburg

The "Dictator" siege mortar at Petersburg. In the foreground, the figure on the right is Brig. Gen. Henry J. Hunt, chief of artillery of the Army of the Potomac.
Fredericksburg, Virginia; May 1863. Soldiers in the trenches. Trench warfare would appear again more infamously in World War I
A portion of the 4th USCT Infantry
Siege of Petersburg, assaults on June 15–18
Siege of Petersburg, movements against the railroads and A.P. Hill's counterattack, June 21–22
Wilson–Kautz Raid, June 22 – July 1
"Dictator" siege mortar on the U.S. Military Railroad at Petersburg
First Battle of Deep Bottom, July 27–29
Siege of Petersburg, Battle of the Crater, July 30
Sketch of the explosion seen from the Union line.
Second Battle of Deep Bottom, August 14–20
Siege of Petersburg, capture of the Weldon Railroad, August 18–19
Siege of Petersburg, actions on October 27
Siege of Petersburg, actions preceding Five Forks
Grant's final assaults and Lee's retreat (start of the Appomattox Campaign)
<center>Lt. Gen.
<center>Maj. Gen.
<center>Maj. Gen.
<center>Gen.
<center>Gen.
<center>Lt. Gen.
<center>Lt. Gen.
<center>Lt. Gen.
<center>Lt. Gen.
<center>Brig. Gen. James H. Wilson</center>
<center>Brig. Gen. August Kautz</center>
Fascine Trench Breastworks, Petersburg, Va. – NARA – 524792. Although identified as Confederate Trenches this is actually Union Fort Sedgwick aka "Fort Hell" which was opposite Fort Mahone aka "Fort Damnation"<ref>Civil War talk Forum</ref>
Union Army 9th Corps attacking Fort Mahone aka "Fort Damanation" sketch by Alfred Ward.
Confederate artilleryman killed during the final Union assault against the trenches at Petersburg. Photo by Thomas C. Roche, April 3, 1865.<ref>Frassanito, p. 360.</ref><ref>See website Petersburg Project on location of Many of the Roche photographs at Petersburg April 1865</ref> Although prints of this picture list it as being taken at Ft Mahone, historians at the "Petersburg Project" believe it was taken at Confederate Battery 25<ref>Dead Artilleryman comments Petersburg Project</ref>
Smoke is still rising from the ruins of Richmond, Virginia after surrendering on April 3, 1865 following the Union victory at the siege of Petersburg. Union cavalry mounts with carbines visible are hitched in the foreground.
Richmond–Petersburg Theater, fall 1864
Confederate
Union

Series of battles around Petersburg, Virginia, fought from June 9, 1864, to March 25, 1865, during the American Civil War.

- Siege of Petersburg
The "Dictator" siege mortar at Petersburg. In the foreground, the figure on the right is Brig. Gen. Henry J. Hunt, chief of artillery of the Army of the Potomac.

112 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Alfred Terry

3 links

Union general in the American Civil War and the military commander of the Dakota Territory from 1866 to 1869 and again from 1872 to 1886.

Union general in the American Civil War and the military commander of the Dakota Territory from 1866 to 1869 and again from 1872 to 1886.

Maj. Gen. Alfred Terry (painting/excerpt 1890): leading the Union Army to capture Fort Fisher in January 1865.
Alfred Terry after the war
Terry as he appears at the Cape Fear Museum in Wilmington, North Carolina, near which he captured Fort Fisher in 1865.

Once the Siege of Petersburg began, Terry continued to fight in the battles north of the James River, notably at the Battle of New Market Heights.

John Gibbon

8 links

Career United States Army officer who fought in the American Civil War and the Indian Wars.

Career United States Army officer who fought in the American Civil War and the Indian Wars.

Gibbon (right), with his II corps commander Hancock (sitting) and fellow division commanders Barlow (left) and Birney (center standing) during the Wilderness campaign
Gibbon (far left) at Lee's surrender at Appomattox (Zoom)
Gibbon and Chief Joseph
John Gibbon's grave at Arlington National Cemetery

During the subsequent Siege of Petersburg campaign (June 1864 to April 1865), Gibbon became disheartened when his troops refused to fight at Ream's Station in August 1864.

V Corps badge

V Corps (Union Army)

15 links

Unit of the Union Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War.

Unit of the Union Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War.

V Corps badge
Maj. Gen. Fitz J. Porter
Maj. Gen. George Sykes
Union Army 1st Division Badge, V Corps
Col. Joshua L. Chamberlain
Maj. Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren

The V Corps saw hard fighting at Cold Harbor and the Siege of Petersburg in June.

Sheridan's charge at Five Forks
(lithograph published c.1886)

Battle of Five Forks

12 links

Sheridan's charge at Five Forks
(lithograph published c.1886)
Major General Fitzhugh Lee
Actions at Petersburg before and during the Battle of Five Forks
Major General George Pickett
Major General W. H. F. "Rooney" Lee
Brigadier General (Brevet Major General) George Armstrong Custer
Major General Philip Sheridan
Colonel Thomas T. Munford
Brigadier General Romeyn B. Ayres
Major General Gouverneur K. Warren
Brigadier General Edgar Gregory
Brigadier General Charles Griffin
National Park Service markers for the Battle of Five Forks, looking south
Artillery position, from which General Lee observed the final Federal attack

The Battle of Five Forks was fought on April 1, 1865, southwest of Petersburg, Virginia, around the road junction of Five Forks, Dinwiddie County, at the end of the Siege of Petersburg, near the conclusion of the American Civil War.

Western Theater Overview (1861&ndash;1865)

Western theater of the American Civil War

9 links

The Western Theater of the American Civil War encompassed major military operations in the states of Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Mississippi, North Carolina, Kentucky, South Carolina and Tennessee, as well as Louisiana east of the Mississippi River.

The Western Theater of the American Civil War encompassed major military operations in the states of Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Mississippi, North Carolina, Kentucky, South Carolina and Tennessee, as well as Louisiana east of the Mississippi River.

Western Theater Overview (1861&ndash;1865)
Western Theater map at The Photographic History of the Civil War
From Belmont (November 1861) to Shiloh (April 1862)
From Corinth (May 1862) to Perryville (October 1862)
Operations against Vicksburg and Grant's Bayou Operations
Grant's operations against Vicksburg
From Vicksburg (December 1862 &ndash; July 1863) to Chickamauga (September 1863)
Tullahoma Campaign
Battles of Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge, Chattanooga Campaign
Map of the Atlanta Campaign
Franklin-Nashville Campaign
Sherman's March to the Sea
Carolinas Campaign

Most of the initiatives failed: Butler became bogged down in the Bermuda Hundred Campaign; Sigel was quickly defeated in the valley; Banks became occupied in the ill-fated Red River Campaign; Meade and Grant experienced many setbacks and much bloodshed in the Overland Campaign before finally settling down to a siege of Petersburg.

A. P. Hill

15 links

Confederate general who was killed in the American Civil War.

Confederate general who was killed in the American Civil War.

General A.P. Hill
Appomattox, A. P. Hill's sword
Portrait of Hill by William Ludwell Sheppard, 1898

During the Siege of Petersburg of 1864–65, Hill and his men participated in several battles during the various Union offensives, particularly Jerusalem Plank Road, the Crater, Globe Tavern, Second Reams Station, and Peebles Farm.

VI Corps badge

VI Corps (Union Army)

11 links

Corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War.

VI Corps badge
Monument to commemorate the death of General John Sedgwick, Commander of the Union Army VI Corps in the American Civil War, at Spotsylvania National Military Park, Virginia, USA.

Accompanying the army to Petersburg, it participated in the preliminary operations incidental to the investment of that stronghold.

Robert Frederick Hoke photo taken in 1862

Robert Hoke

1 links

Confederate major general during the American Civil War.

Confederate major general during the American Civil War.

Robert Frederick Hoke photo taken in 1862
Hoke in later years

Wounded at Chancellorsville, he recovered in time for the defense of Petersburg and Richmond.

The battle of Petersburg Va. April 2nd 1865, lithograph by Currier and Ives

Third Battle of Petersburg

10 links

The battle of Petersburg Va. April 2nd 1865, lithograph by Currier and Ives
Grant's assault on the Petersburg line and the start of Lee's retreat
Major General Horatio G. Wright
Lieutenant General A. P. Hill
Major General Cadmus Wilcox
Major General John Gibbon
Major General John B. Gordon
Major General John G. Parke
Picket Post in front of Union Fort Sedgwick
Quarters of Men in Union Fort Sedgwick, Known as "Fort Hell"
61st Massachusetts Infantry attacking Fort Mahone April 1865
Confederate defenses of Fort Mahone aka Battery 29 at Petersburg, Virginia, 1865
Interior of Fort Mahone in 1865 also known as "Fort Damnation"
Brigadier General (Brevet Major General) Nelson A. Miles
Brigadier General John R. Cooke
National Park Service marker for Fort Gregg
Confederate Casualty trenches at Petersburg April 1865
Dead Confederate soldier at Petersburg, Virginia, April 1865.
Dead Confederate soldier at Petersburg, Virginia, April 1865.
Dead Confederate soldier at Petersburg, Virginia, April 1865
Dead Confederate soldier at Petersburg, Virginia, April 1865
Confederate Casualty trenches at Petersburg April 1865

The Third Battle of Petersburg, also known as the Breakthrough at Petersburg or the Fall of Petersburg, was fought on April 2, 1865, south and southwest of Petersburg, Virginia, at the end of the 292-day Richmond–Petersburg Campaign (sometimes called the Siege of Petersburg) and in the beginning stage of the Appomattox Campaign near the conclusion of the American Civil War.

Virginia

3 links

State in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern regions of the United States, between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains.

State in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern regions of the United States, between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains.

The story of Pocahontas was romanticized by later artists, in part because of her association with the First Families of Virginia.
Williamsburg was Virginia's capital from 1699 to 1780.
1851 painting of Patrick Henry's speech before the House of Burgesses on the Virginia Resolves against the Stamp Act of 1765
Richmond was the capital of the Confederacy from 1861 to 1865, when it was partially burned by them prior to its recapture by Union forces.
Many World War I-era warships were built in Newport News, including the USS Virginia.
Protests in 2020 were focused on the Confederate monuments in the state.
Virginia is shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains, the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed, and the parallel 36°30′ north.
Great Falls is on the fall line of the Potomac River, and its rocks date to the late Precambrian.
Oak trees in particular produce a haze of isoprene, which helps gives the Blue Ridge Mountains their signature color.
White-tailed deer are also known as Virginia deer, and up to seven thousand live in Shenandoah National Park.
Population density of Virginia counties and cities in 2020
New citizens attend a naturalization ceremony in Northern Virginia, where 25% of residents are foreign-born, almost twice the overall state average
Since 1927, Arlington National Cemetery has hosted an annual nondenominational sunrise service every Easter.
Virginia counties and cities by median household income (2010)
The Department of Defense is headquartered in Arlington at the Pentagon, the world's largest office building.
Ocean tourism is an important sector of Virginia Beach's economy.
Rockingham County accounts for twenty percent of Virginia's agricultural sales.
Colonial Virginian culture, language, and style are reenacted in Williamsburg.
Americana Roots Folk Rock band The Steel Wheels play at the Jefferson Theater in Charlottesville
The annual Pony Penning features more than two hundred wild ponies swimming across the Assateague Channel into Chincoteague.
USA Today, the nation's most circulated newspaper, has its headquarters in McLean.
Virginia's public schools serve over a million students at over 2,200 schools.
The University of Virginia, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, guarantees full tuition scholarships to all in-state students from families earning up to $80,000.
Patients are screened for COVID-19 outside Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, the Navy's oldest continuously operating hospital.
The Silver Line extension of the Washington Metro system opened in Tysons Corner in 2014.
The Virginia State Capitol, designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clérisseau, is home to the Virginia General Assembly.
Unlike the federal system, justices of the Virginia Supreme Court have term limits and a mandatory retirement age, and select their own Chief Justice.
Mirroring Virginia's political transition, the annual Shad Planking event in Wakefield has evolved from a vestige of the Byrd era into a regular stop for many state campaigns.
Republicans gained seven seats (red) in the 2021 General Assembly elections.
Mark Warner and Tim Kaine, Virginia's two U.S. Senators, are both former governors.
The annual Monument Avenue 10K in Richmond has become one of the ten largest timed races in the U.S.
Mike Scott and Joe Harris of the Virginia Cavaliers battle Cadarian Raines of the Virginia Tech Hokies for a rebound at Cassell Coliseum
The state slogan, "Virginia is for Lovers", has been used since 1969 and is featured on the state's welcome signs.

After the capture of Richmond that month, the state capital was briefly moved to Lynchburg, while the Confederate leadership fled to Danville.