A report on Siege of Petersburg

The "Dictator" siege mortar at Petersburg. In the foreground, the figure on the right is Brig. Gen. Henry J. Hunt, chief of artillery of the Army of the Potomac.
Fredericksburg, Virginia; May 1863. Soldiers in the trenches. Trench warfare would appear again more infamously in World War I
A portion of the 4th USCT Infantry
Siege of Petersburg, assaults on June 15–18
Siege of Petersburg, movements against the railroads and A.P. Hill's counterattack, June 21–22
Wilson–Kautz Raid, June 22 – July 1
"Dictator" siege mortar on the U.S. Military Railroad at Petersburg
First Battle of Deep Bottom, July 27–29
Siege of Petersburg, Battle of the Crater, July 30
Sketch of the explosion seen from the Union line.
Second Battle of Deep Bottom, August 14–20
Siege of Petersburg, capture of the Weldon Railroad, August 18–19
Siege of Petersburg, actions on October 27
Siege of Petersburg, actions preceding Five Forks
Grant's final assaults and Lee's retreat (start of the Appomattox Campaign)
<center>Lt. Gen.
<center>Maj. Gen.
<center>Maj. Gen.
<center>Gen.
<center>Gen.
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<center>Lt. Gen.
<center>Lt. Gen.
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<center>Brig. Gen. James H. Wilson</center>
<center>Brig. Gen. August Kautz</center>
Fascine Trench Breastworks, Petersburg, Va. – NARA – 524792. Although identified as Confederate Trenches this is actually Union Fort Sedgwick aka "Fort Hell" which was opposite Fort Mahone aka "Fort Damnation"<ref>Civil War talk Forum</ref>
Union Army 9th Corps attacking Fort Mahone aka "Fort Damanation" sketch by Alfred Ward.
Confederate artilleryman killed during the final Union assault against the trenches at Petersburg. Photo by Thomas C. Roche, April 3, 1865.<ref>Frassanito, p. 360.</ref><ref>See website Petersburg Project on location of Many of the Roche photographs at Petersburg April 1865</ref> Although prints of this picture list it as being taken at Ft Mahone, historians at the "Petersburg Project" believe it was taken at Confederate Battery 25<ref>Dead Artilleryman comments Petersburg Project</ref>
Smoke is still rising from the ruins of Richmond, Virginia after surrendering on April 3, 1865 following the Union victory at the siege of Petersburg. Union cavalry mounts with carbines visible are hitched in the foreground.
Richmond–Petersburg Theater, fall 1864
Confederate
Union

Series of battles around Petersburg, Virginia, fought from June 9, 1864, to March 25, 1865, during the American Civil War.

- Siege of Petersburg
The "Dictator" siege mortar at Petersburg. In the foreground, the figure on the right is Brig. Gen. Henry J. Hunt, chief of artillery of the Army of the Potomac.

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Horatio G. Wright

Horatio Wright

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Engineer and general in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Engineer and general in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Horatio G. Wright
General Wright in front of his tent.
Portrait by Mathew Brady or Levin C. Handy, c. 1873

In the Siege of Petersburg, the VI Corps was the first unit to break through the Confederate defenses, on April 2, 1865.

John Parke

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United States Army engineer and a Union general in the American Civil War.

United States Army engineer and a Union general in the American Civil War.

Parke served as chief of staff to Burnside during the Overland Campaign, in which the latter commanded IX Corps, as well as in the beginning stages of the Siege of Petersburg.

Romeyn B. Ayres

Romeyn B. Ayres

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Union Army general in the American Civil War.

Union Army general in the American Civil War.

Romeyn B. Ayres
Romeyn B. Ayres

He received command of a new 2nd Division of the V Corps for the Siege of Petersburg.

General Heth

Henry Heth

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Career United States Army officer who became a Confederate general in the American Civil War.

Career United States Army officer who became a Confederate general in the American Civil War.

General Heth
Heth as a member of the Confederate Army
An illustration of Confederate troops at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863
Heth in 1895

Heth also participated in the Siege of Petersburg, playing direct roles in the battles of Globe Tavern; Second Ream's Station; Peeble's Farm; Boydton Plank Road; and Hatcher's Run.

David B. Birney

David B. Birney

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Businessman, lawyer, and a Union general in the American Civil War.

Businessman, lawyer, and a Union general in the American Civil War.

David B. Birney
Birney (center standing), with his II corps commander Hancock and fellow division commanders Barlow and Gibbon during the Wilderness campaign
David B. Birney grave at the Woodlands Cemetery

During the Siege of Petersburg, Birney became ill with diarrhea.

Edward Ferrero

Edward Ferrero

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One of the leading dance instructors, choreographers, and ballroom operators in the United States.

One of the leading dance instructors, choreographers, and ballroom operators in the United States.

Edward Ferrero

Transferred eastward again in 1864 with the corps, he served in the Siege of Petersburg, commanding a division of black troops.

Henry Pleasants

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Coal mining engineer and an officer in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Coal mining engineer and an officer in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

The Union troops, however, failed in their opportunity to break the Siege of Petersburg.

Chamberlain in the 1860s

Joshua Chamberlain

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American college professor from Maine who volunteered during the American Civil War to join the Union Army.

American college professor from Maine who volunteered during the American Civil War to join the Union Army.

Chamberlain in the 1860s
Chamberlain's younger brother, Thomas, who was the Lieutenant Colonel of the 20th Maine
Capt. Ellis Spear, Chamberlain's "right-hand man" on Little Round Top
Chamberlain's position on Little Round Top
Little Round Top, western slope, photographed by Timothy H. O'Sullivan, 1863
Confederate General John B. Gordon was assigned the task to surrender all arms to Gen. Chamberlain.
Chamberlain as the Governor of Maine
Chamberlain later in life in Portland, wearing uniform and his medals
The Joshua Chamberlain Museum
Chamberlain memorial in Brewer
Chamberlain statue erected in 2003 at his alma mater, Bowdoin College, in Brunswick, where he served as president
Joshua L. Chamberlain grave marker in Pine Grove Cemetery

In April 1864, Chamberlain returned to the Army of the Potomac and was promoted to brigade commander shortly before the Siege of Petersburg and given command of the 1st Brigade, First Division, V Corps.

Battery XVI in the Main Unit

Petersburg National Battlefield

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Battery XVI in the Main Unit
Grant's headquarters at the City Point unit.
Reenactors at Petersburg National Battlefield.

Petersburg National Battlefield is a National Park Service unit preserving sites related to the American Civil War Siege of Petersburg (1864–65).

A map of the Union raiders' route

Battle of Sappony Church

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A map of the Union raiders' route
Map of Sappony Church Battlefield core and study areas by the American Battlefield Protection Program.

The Battle of Sappony Church, also known as the Battle of Stony Creek Depot, was an engagement of the American Civil War, between the Confederate States of America and the Union, which took place on June 28, 1864, during the Wilson-Kautz Raid of the Richmond–Petersburg Campaign.