Sigmund Freud

FreudFreudianFreudian theoryFreud, SigmundFreudianismSigmundDr. Sigmund FreudDr. Sigmund FruitFreudian psychoanalysisFreudian Psychology
Sigmund Freud (born Sigismund Schlomo Freud; 6 May 1856 – 23 September 1939) was an Austrian neurologist and the founder of psychoanalysis, a clinical method for treating psychopathology through dialogue between a patient and a psychoanalyst.wikipedia
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Psychoanalysis

psychoanalystpsychoanalyticpsychoanalytical
Sigmund Freud (born Sigismund Schlomo Freud; 6 May 1856 – 23 September 1939) was an Austrian neurologist and the founder of psychoanalysis, a clinical method for treating psychopathology through dialogue between a patient and a psychoanalyst.
The discipline was established in the early 1890s by Austrian neurologist Sigmund Freud and stemmed partly from the clinical work of Josef Breuer and others.

Oedipus complex

OedipalOedipal complexOedipal conflict
Freud's redefinition of sexuality to include its infantile forms led him to formulate the Oedipus complex as the central tenet of psychoanalytical theory.
Sigmund Freud introduced the concept in his Interpretation of Dreams (1899) and coined the expression in his A Special Type of Choice of Object made by Men (1910).

Vienna

Vienna, AustriaWienViennese
Freud lived and worked in Vienna, having set up his clinical practice there in 1886.
Additionally to being labeled the "City of Music" due to its musical legacy, Vienna is also said to be the "City of Dreams", because of it being home to the world's first psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud.

Transference

transferA cognitive moduleerotic transference
In founding psychoanalysis, Freud developed therapeutic techniques such as the use of free association and discovered transference, establishing its central role in the analytic process.
Transference was first described by Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis, who considered it an important part of psychoanalytic treatment.

Death drive

death instinctThanatosdeath wish
Freud postulated the existence of libido, a sexualised energy with which mental processes and structures are invested and which generates erotic attachments, and a death drive, the source of compulsive repetition, hate, aggression and neurotic guilt.
In classical Freudian psychoanalytic theory, the death drive (Todestrieb) is the drive toward death and self-destruction.

Dream

dreamsdreamlikedreaming
His analysis of dreams as wish-fulfillments provided him with models for the clinical analysis of symptom formation and the underlying mechanisms of repression.
Many endorse the Freudian theory of dreams – that dreams reveal insight into hidden desires and emotions.

Free association (psychology)

free associationfree-associativefree-association
In founding psychoanalysis, Freud developed therapeutic techniques such as the use of free association and discovered transference, establishing its central role in the analytic process.
The technique is used in psychoanalysis (and also in psychodynamic theory) which was originally devised by Sigmund Freud out of the hypnotic method of his mentor and colleague, Josef Breuer.

Freud family

great-granddaughterFreudFreud's sister
In 1859, the Freud family left Freiberg.
The family of Sigmund Freud, the pioneer of psychoanalysis, lived in Austria and Germany until the 1930s before emigrating to England, Canada and the United States.

Jacob Freud

Jakob Freud
His father, Jakob Freud (1815–1896), a wool merchant, had two sons, Emanuel (1833–1914) and Philipp (1836–1911), by his first marriage.
Jacob Koloman Freud (1815–1896) was the father of Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis.

Psychotherapy

psychotherapistpsychotherapeutictherapy
Historically, psychotherapy has sometimes meant "interpretative" (i.e. Freudian) methods, namely psychoanalysis, in contrast with other methods to treat psychiatric disorders such as behavior modification.

Libido

sex drivesexual desirelibidinal
Freud postulated the existence of libido, a sexualised energy with which mental processes and structures are invested and which generates erotic attachments, and a death drive, the source of compulsive repetition, hate, aggression and neurotic guilt.
Sigmund Freud, who is considered the originator of the modern use of the term, defined libido as "the energy, regarded as a quantitative magnitude... of those instincts which have to do with all that may be comprised under the word 'love'."

Amalia Freud

Amalia NathansohnAmalia Nathansohn FreudAmalia Nathansohn-Freud
He and Freud's mother, Amalia Nathansohn, who was 20 years younger and his third wife, were married by Rabbi Isaac Noah Mannheimer on 29 July 1855.
Amalia Nathansohn Freud (18 August 1835 – 12 September 1930) was the third wife of Jacob Freud and mother of Sigmund Freud.

Franz Brentano

BrentanoDescriptive psychology (Brentano)Franz
He had planned to study law, but joined the medical faculty at the university, where his studies included philosophy under Franz Brentano, physiology under Ernst Brücke, and zoology under Darwinist professor Carl Claus.
Franz Clemens Honoratus Hermann Brentano (16 January 1838 – 17 March 1917) was an influential German philosopher, psychologist, and priest whose work strongly influenced not only students Edmund Husserl, Sigmund Freud, Tomáš Masaryk, Rudolf Steiner, Alexius Meinong, Carl Stumpf, Anton Marty, Kazimierz Twardowski, and Christian von Ehrenfels, but many others whose work would follow and make use of his original ideas and concepts.

Martha Bernays

Martha FreudMarthaMartha Bernays Freud
The same year he married Martha Bernays, the granddaughter of Isaac Bernays, a chief rabbi in Hamburg.
Martha Bernays (26 July 1861 – 2 November 1951) was the wife of Austrian psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud.

Anna Freud

AnnaA. FreudFreudian
1893), and Anna (b.
She was born in Vienna, the sixth and youngest child of Sigmund Freud and Martha Bernays.

Psychopathology

psychopathologicalpsychopathologiespsychopathologist
Sigmund Freud (born Sigismund Schlomo Freud; 6 May 1856 – 23 September 1939) was an Austrian neurologist and the founder of psychoanalysis, a clinical method for treating psychopathology through dialogue between a patient and a psychoanalyst.
In the nineteenth century, greatly influenced by Rousseau's ideas and philosophy, Austrian psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud would bring about psychotherapy and become the father of psychoanalysis, a clinical method for treating psychopathology through dialogue between a patient and a psychoanalyst.

Repression (psychology)

repressionrepressedpsychological repression
His analysis of dreams as wish-fulfillments provided him with models for the clinical analysis of symptom formation and the underlying mechanisms of repression.
As Sigmund Freud moved away from hypnosis, and towards urging his patients to remember the past in a conscious state, 'the very difficulty and laboriousness of the process led Freud to a crucial insight'.

The Interpretation of Dreams

Interpretation of Dreamstheory of dreamsdream interpretation
In 1899 he published The Interpretation of Dreams in which, following a critical review of existing theory, Freud gives detailed interpretations of his own and his patients' dreams in terms of wish-fulfillments made subject to the repression and censorship of the "dream work".
The Interpretation of Dreams (Die Traumdeutung) is an 1899 book by Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis, in which the author introduces his theory of the unconscious with respect to dream interpretation, and discusses what would later become the theory of the Oedipus complex.

Philosophy of the Unconscious

The Philosophy of the UnconsciousEduard von Hartmann's ''Philosophy of the Unconscious
Freud owned and made use of Charles Darwin's major evolutionary writings, and was also influenced by Eduard von Hartmann's The Philosophy of the Unconscious (1869).
The work influenced Sigmund Freud's and Carl Jung's theories of the unconscious.

The Psychopathology of Everyday Life

book
In works which would win him a more general readership, Freud applied his theories outside the clinical setting in The Psychopathology of Everyday Life (1901) and Jokes and their Relation to the Unconscious (1905).
Psychopathology of Everyday Life (Zur Psychopathologie des Alltagslebens) is a 1901 work by Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis.

Freud's seduction theory

seduction theoryhis seduction theory
On the basis of his early clinical work, Freud had postulated that unconscious memories of sexual molestation in early childhood were a necessary precondition for the psychoneuroses (hysteria and obsessional neurosis), a formulation now known as Freud's seduction theory.
Freud's seduction theory (Verführungstheorie) was a hypothesis posited in the mid-1890s by Sigmund Freud that he believed provided the solution to the problem of the origins of hysteria and obsessional neurosis.

Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality

Three Contributions to the Theory of Sexsexualitytheory of sexuality
In Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality, published in 1905, Freud elaborates his theory of infantile sexuality, describing its "polymorphous perverse" forms and the functioning of the "drives", to which it gives rise, in the formation of sexual identity.
Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality (Drei Abhandlungen zur Sexualtheorie), sometimes titled Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex, is a 1905 work by Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis, in which the author advances his theory of sexuality, in particular its relation to childhood.

Emma Eckstein

nasal reflex
Freud had Fliess repeatedly operate on his nose and sinuses to treat "nasal reflex neurosis", and subsequently referred his patient Emma Eckstein to him.
She was "one of Sigmund Freud's most important patients and, for a short period of time around 1897, became a psychoanalyst herself".

Humor in Freud

Wit and Its Relation to the UnconsciousFreudian jokeJokes and their Relation to the Unconscious
In works which would win him a more general readership, Freud applied his theories outside the clinical setting in The Psychopathology of Everyday Life (1901) and Jokes and their Relation to the Unconscious (1905).
Sigmund Freud noticed that humor, like dreams, can be related to unconscious content.

Dora (case study)

DoraIda Bauercase study of "Dora
The same year he published Fragment of an Analysis of a Case of Hysteria, which became one of his more famous and controversial case studies.
Dora is the pseudonym given by Sigmund Freud to a patient whom he diagnosed with hysteria, and treated for about eleven weeks in 1900.