Sikhism

SikhSikhsSikh religionSikhiSikh faithSikh DharmaGurupurabSikh philosophySikh religious philosophyPrakash Utsav
Sikhism, or Sikhi (, from Sikh, meaning a "disciple", "seeker," or "learner"), is a monotheistic religion that originated in the Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent around the end of the 15th century.wikipedia
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Sikhs

SikhPunjabi SikhPunjabi Sikhs
Sikhism, or Sikhi (, from Sikh, meaning a "disciple", "seeker," or "learner"), is a monotheistic religion that originated in the Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent around the end of the 15th century.
Sikhs ( or ; ਸਿੱਖ,, ) are people associated with Sikhism, a monotheistic religion that originated in the 15th century, in the Punjab region in the northern part of the Indian subcontinent, based on the revelation of Guru Nanak.

Monotheism

monotheisticmonotheistmonotheists
Sikhism, or Sikhi (, from Sikh, meaning a "disciple", "seeker," or "learner"), is a monotheistic religion that originated in the Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent around the end of the 15th century.
The broader definition of monotheism characterizes the traditions of Bábism, the Bahá'í Faith, Balinese Hinduism, Cao Dai (Caodaiism), Cheondoism (Cheondogyo), Christianity, Deism, Eckankar, Hindu sects such as Shaivism and Vaishnavism, Islam, Judaism, Mandaeism, Rastafari, Seicho no Ie, Sikhism, Tengrism (Tangrism), Tenrikyo (Tenriism), Yazidism, and Zoroastrianism, and elements of pre-monotheistic thought are found in early religions such as Atenism, ancient Chinese religion, and Yahwism.

Guru Nanak

Guru Nanak DevNanakGuru Nanak Dev Ji
Sikhism is based on the spiritual teachings of Guru Nanak, the first Guru (1469–1539), and the nine Sikh gurus that succeeded him.
Guru Nanak (, IAST: Gurū Nānak) (15 April 1469 – 22 September 1539), also referred to as Baba Nanak ('father Nanak'), was the founder of Sikhism and the first of the ten Sikh Gurus.

List of religious populations

Demographics of religionnumbers of adherentsworld's fifth largest organized religion
It is one of the youngest of the major world religions and the world's fifth largest organized religion, as well as being the world's ninth-largest overall religion.

Selfless service

sevaSewaService
The fundamental beliefs of Sikhism, articulated in the sacred scripture Guru Granth Sahib, include faith and meditation on the name of the one creator, divine unity and equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, striving for justice for the benefit and prosperity of all and honest conduct and livelihood while living a householder's life.
Selfless service or Seva in Sikhism, its ordained philosophy, in Sikh scripture, the theology, and is a service which is performed without any expectation of result or award for performing it.

Sikh gurus

Sikh GuruGuruGurus
Sikhism is based on the spiritual teachings of Guru Nanak, the first Guru (1469–1539), and the nine Sikh gurus that succeeded him.
The Sikh gurus (Punjabi: ਸਿੱਖ ਗੁਰੂ) are the spiritual masters of sikhism, who established this religion over the course of about two and a half centuries, beginning in 1469.

Five Thieves

Five EvilsFive inner thievesFive Thieves''' (foibles)
It teaches followers to transform the "Five Thieves" (lust, rage, greed, attachment, and ego). In Sikhism, the influences of ego, anger, greed, attachment, and lust, known as the Five Thieves, are believed to be particularly distracting and hurtful.
In Sikhism, the Five Thieves are the five major weaknesses of the human personality at variance with its spiritual essence, and are known as "thieves" because they steal a person's inherent common sense.

Ik Onkar

Ek Onkarone GodEk-Omkar (One AUM)
The fundamental beliefs of Sikhism, articulated in the sacred scripture Guru Granth Sahib, include faith and meditation on the name of the one creator, divine unity and equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, striving for justice for the benefit and prosperity of all and honest conduct and livelihood while living a householder's life. The Sikh scripture opens with Ik Onkar, its Mul Mantar and fundamental prayer about One Supreme Being (God).
Ik Onkar (Gurmukhi:, ਇੱਕ ਓਅੰਕਾਰ; ) is the symbol that represents the one supreme reality and is a central tenet of Sikh religious philosophy.

Punjab

Punjab regionPanjabPunjabi
Sikhism, or Sikhi (, from Sikh, meaning a "disciple", "seeker," or "learner"), is a monotheistic religion that originated in the Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent around the end of the 15th century.
The main religions of the Indian Punjab region are Sikhism and Hinduism.

God in Sikhism

Godmonotheistic GodOne Creator
The Sikh scripture opens with Ik Onkar, its Mul Mantar and fundamental prayer about One Supreme Being (God).
The Sikh gurus have described God in numerous ways in their hymns included in the Guru Granth Sahib, the holy scripture of Sikhism, but the oneness of the deity is consistently emphasized throughout.

Kirtan

sankirtanKeerthanakirtans
Sikhism emphasizes simran (meditation on the words of the Guru Granth Sahib), that can be expressed musically through kirtan or internally through Nam Japo (repeat God's name) as a means to feel God's presence.
It is a major practice in Hinduism, Vaisnava devotionalism, Sikhism, the Sant traditions and some forms of Buddhism, as well as other religious groups.

Naam Japo

Naam SimranNaam Japnanām
Sikhism emphasizes simran (meditation on the words of the Guru Granth Sahib), that can be expressed musically through kirtan or internally through Nam Japo (repeat God's name) as a means to feel God's presence.
In Sikhism, Nām Japō (Gurmukhi ਨਾਮ ਜਪੋ), Naam Japna, or Naam Simran refers to the meditation, vocal singing of hymns from the Sri Guru Granth Sahib or contemplating the various Names of God (or qualities of God), especially the chanting of the word Waheguru, which means "Wonderful Lord" representing the formless being, the creator of all the forms and the being omnipresent in all forms.

Reincarnation

reincarnatedrebirthpast lives
Sikhs believe in reincarnation and karma concepts found in Buddhism, Hinduism and Jainism.
Reincarnation is a central tenet of Indian religions, namely Jainism, Buddhism, Sikhism and Hinduism, although there are Hindu groups that do not believe in reincarnation but believe in an afterlife.

Guru Arjan

Guru Arjan DevGuru Arjan Dev JiGuru Arjun Dev
Two of the Sikh gurus – Guru Arjan (1563–1605) and Guru Tegh Bahadur (1621–1675) – were tortured and executed by the Mughal rulers after they refused to convert to Islam.
Guru Arjan led Sikhism for a quarter of a century.

Kaam

Kamkamalust
In Sikhism, the influences of ego, anger, greed, attachment, and lust, known as the Five Thieves, are believed to be particularly distracting and hurtful.
Kaam (from kama) meaning deep extensive desire, uncontrolled longing, concupiscence, sensuality or lasciviousness is counted among the five cardinal sins or sinful propensities in Sikhism.

Bhakti movement

bhaktiBhakti ageBhakti era
Sikhism was influenced by the Bhakti movement, but it was not simply an extension of Bhakti.
The Bhakti movement refers to the Hindu devotional trend that emerged from Tamil Nadu and later acted as the defacto catalyst to the formation and subsequent revolutionization in the form of Sikhism.

Karma

karmicKarmaskamma
Sikhs believe in reincarnation and karma concepts found in Buddhism, Hinduism and Jainism.
The philosophy of karma is closely associated with the idea of rebirth in many schools of Indian religions (particularly Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism ) as well as Taoism.

Raga

rāgaragasraag
The opening line of the Guru Granth Sahib and each subsequent raga, mentions Ik Oankar (translated by Pashaura Singh):
Rāga are also found in Sikh traditions such as in Guru Granth Sahib, the primary scripture of Sikhism.

Guru Angad

Guru Angad DevGuru Angad Dev JiLehna
The majority of Sikh scriptures were originally written in the Gurmukhī alphabet, a script standardised by Guru Angad out of Laṇḍā scripts used in North India.
He met Guru Nanak, the founder of Sikhism, and became a Sikh.

Waheguru

VāhigurūWaheguru GurmantarWaheguru Ji Ka Khalsa Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh
In Sikhism, the concept of "God" is Waheguru considered Nirankar (shapeless), akal (timeless), and Agam Agochar (incomprehensible and invisible).
Waheguru refers to the almighty God, the supreme soul, the creator in Sikhism.

Guru Tegh Bahadur

Guru Teg BahadurTegh BahadurGuru Tegh Bahadar
Two of the Sikh gurus – Guru Arjan (1563–1605) and Guru Tegh Bahadur (1621–1675) – were tortured and executed by the Mughal rulers after they refused to convert to Islam.
Guru Tegh Bahadur ( or ; 1 April 1621 – 11 November 1675) was the ninth of ten Gurus of the Sikh religion.

Dharma

DhammaDharmicdharmas
Guru Nanak's ideal is the total exposure of one's being to the divine Name and a total conforming to Dharma or the "Divine Order".
dhamma) is a key concept with multiple meanings in Indian religions, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism and others.

Guru Gobind Singh

Gobind SinghGuru Gobind Singh JiGuru Govind Singh
The Tenth Guru, Guru Gobind Singh, named the Sikh scripture Guru Granth Sahib as his successor, terminating the line of human Gurus and making the scripture the eternal, religious spiritual guide for Sikhs.
Among his notable contributions to Sikhism are founding the Sikh warrior community called Khalsa in 1699 and introducing the Five Ks, the five articles of faith that Khalsa Sikhs wear at all times.

Guru Hargobind

Guru Har GobindGuru Hargobind SahibHargobind
Guru Hargobind, the sixth Sikh Guru, established the political/temporal (Miri) and spiritual (Piri) realms to be mutually coexistent.
Guru Hargobind ( 19 June 1595 - 3 March 1644), revered as the sixth Nanak, was the sixth of ten Gurus of the Sikh religion.

North India

Northern IndianorthernNorth Indian
The majority of Sikh scriptures were originally written in the Gurmukhī alphabet, a script standardised by Guru Angad out of Laṇḍā scripts used in North India.
Other religions practiced by various ethnic communities include Islam, Sikhism, Jainism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Bahá'í, Christianity, and Buddhism.