Silesia

ŚląskSilesianSchlesienUpper SilesiaPrussian SilesiaSilesiansSlezskoAustrian Silesiaeastern GermanGerman Silesia
Silesia (Śląsk ; Slezsko; ; Silesian German: Schläsing; Silesian: Ślůnsk ; Šlazyńska; ; Silesia) is a historical region of Central Europe located mostly in Poland, with small parts in the Czech Republic and Germany.wikipedia
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Lower Silesia

LowerDuchies of Lower SilesiaLow Silesia
It consists of Lower Silesia and Upper Silesia.
Lower Silesia (Dolny Śląsk; ; Silesia Inferior; Niederschlesien; Silesian German: Niederschläsing; ) is the northwestern part of the historical and geographical region of Silesia; Upper Silesia is to the southeast.

Wrocław

BreslauBreslau (Wrocław)Wroclaw
Silesia's largest city and historical capital is Wrocław.
Wrocław ( (English: ); Breslau ; Vratislav; Vratislavia) is a city in western Poland and the largest city in the historical region of Silesia.

Upper Silesia

UpperSilesiaSilesian
It consists of Lower Silesia and Upper Silesia.
Upper Silesia (Górny Śląsk; Silesian Polish: Gůrny Ślůnsk; Horní Slezsko; Oberschlesien; Silesian German: Oberschläsing; Silesia Superior) is the southeastern part of the historical and geographical region of Silesia, located mostly in Poland, with small parts in the Czech Republic.

Great Moravia

MoraviaMoraviansGreat Moravian Empire
The first known states to hold power there were probably those of Greater Moravia at the end of the 9th century and Bohemia early in the 10th century.
Great Moravia (Regnum Marahensium; Μεγάλη Μοραβία, Megálī Moravía; ; Veľká Morava ; Wielkie Morawy), the Great Moravian Empire, or simply Moravia, was the first major state that was predominantly West Slavic to emerge in the area of Central Europe, chiefly on what is now the territory of the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland (including Silesia), Hungary, and Serbia (Vojvodina).

Duchies of Silesia

Silesian duchiesSilesian duchySilesia
In the 10th century, Silesia was incorporated into the early Polish state, and after its division in the 12th century became a Piast duchy. During the Fragmentation of Poland, Silesia and the rest of the country were divided among many independent duchies ruled by various Silesian dukes.
The Duchies of Silesia were the more than twenty divisions of the region of Silesia formed between the 12th and 14th centuries by the breakup of the Duchy of Silesia, then part of the Kingdom of Poland.

Upper Silesian metropolitan area

Silesian Metropolitan Areathe same metropolitan areaUpper Silesian area
The biggest metropolitan area is the Upper Silesian metropolitan area, the centre of which is Katowice.
The Upper Silesian metropolitan area is a metropolitan area in southern Poland and northeast Czech Republic, centered on the cities of Katowice and Ostrava in Silesia.

Austrian Silesia

SilesiaUpper and Lower SilesiaDuchy of Upper and Lower Silesia
The remaining former Austrian parts of Silesia were partitioned to Czechoslovakia, forming part of Czechoslovakia's German-settled Sudetenland region, and are today part of the Czech Republic.
It is largely coterminous with the present-day region of Czech Silesia and was, historically, part of the larger Silesia region.

Poland

🇵🇱PolishPOL
Silesia (Śląsk ; Slezsko; ; Silesian German: Schläsing; Silesian: Ślůnsk ; Šlazyńska; ; Silesia) is a historical region of Central Europe located mostly in Poland, with small parts in the Czech Republic and Germany.
South of the Northern European Plain are the regions of Lusatia, Silesia and Masovia, which are marked by broad ice-age river valleys.

Ostrava

Moravská OstravaOstrauMährisch-Ostrau
Parts of the Czech city of Ostrava fall within the borders of Silesia.
The settlement occupied a strategic position on the border between the two historical provinces of Moravia and Silesia, and on the ancient trade route from the Baltic Sea to the Adriatic known as the Amber Road.

Silesian German

SilesianLower SilesianGerman
Silesia (Śląsk ; Slezsko; ; Silesian German: Schläsing; Silesian: Ślůnsk ; Šlazyńska; ; Silesia) is a historical region of Central Europe located mostly in Poland, with small parts in the Czech Republic and Germany.
Silesian (Silesian: Schläsche Sproache or Schläs'sche Sproche, Schlesisch), Silesian German or Lower Silesian is a nearly extinct German dialect spoken in Silesia.

Görlitz

Görlitz, GermanyGörlitz, Kreisfreie Stadt
The largest town and cultural centre of this region is Görlitz.
Thus it is both the most Silesian town, in terms of character, and the largest in Germany today.

Treaty of Berlin (1742)

Treaty of BerlinBerlin1742 partition of Silesia
Most of Silesia was conquered by Prussia in 1742 and transferred from Austria to Prussia in the Treaty of Berlin.
Maria Theresa ceded most of Silesia with the County of Kladsko to Frederick, except for those districts of the Duchy of Troppau that were located south of the Opava river, including the southern part of the former Duchy of Jägerndorf, the possession of which had been one pretext for Frederick's invasion.

Lands of the Bohemian Crown

Bohemian CrownBohemiaCrown of Bohemia
In the 14th century, it became a constituent part of the Bohemian Crown Lands under the Holy Roman Empire, which passed to the Austrian Habsburg Monarchy in 1526.
They significantly enlarged the Bohemian lands again, including when King John the Blind vassalized most Polish Piast dukes of Silesia.

Lusatia

Upper LusatiaLausitzUpper Lusatian
The small Lusatian strip west of the Oder–Neisse line, which had belonged to Silesia since 1815, remained in Germany.
The border between Upper and Lower Lusatia is roughly marked by the course of the Black Elster river at Senftenberg and its eastern continuation toward the Silesian town of Przewóz on the Lusatian Neisse.

Silesian Przesieka

Preseka
Local Slavs started to erect boundary structures like the Silesian Przesieka and the Silesia Walls.
Silesian Przesieka, literally Silesian Cutting (Przesieka Śląska or Oseg, Schlesischer Grenzwald, Hag or Preseka, Indago) was a densely forested, uninhabited and unpassable strip of land in the middle of Silesia, spreading from Golden Mountains in the south, along the Nysa Kłodzka to the Odra, and then along the Stobrawa, reaching the towns of Namysłów and Byczyna in northern Silesia.

Bytom

BeuthenBitomBytom (Beuthen)
The eastern border of Silesian settlement was situated to the west of the Bytom, and east from Racibórz and Cieszyn.
Bytom ( Polish pronunciation: ; Silesian: Bytůń, Beuthen O.S.) is a city in Silesia in southern Poland, near Katowice.

Silingi

SilingSiling VandalsSilinger
They disagree with the hypothesis of an origin for the name Śląsk from the name of the Silings tribe, an etymology preferred by some German authors.
The Silingi at one point lived in Silesia, and the names Silesia and Silingi may be related.

Silesian tribes

Silesiantribes located in Silesia
The eastern border of Silesian settlement was situated to the west of the Bytom, and east from Racibórz and Cieszyn.
The Silesian tribes (plemiona śląskie) is a term used to refer to tribes, or groups of West Slavs that lived in the territories of Silesia in the Early Middle Ages.

Lugii

LugiansLongionesLigians
Germanic Lugii tribes were first recorded within Silesia in the 1st century.
The Lugii (or Lugi, Legii, Lygii, Ligii, Lugiones, Lygians, Ligians, Lugians, or Lougoi) were a large tribal confederation mentioned by Roman authors living in ca. 100 BC–300 AD in Central Europe, north of the Sudetes mountains in the basin of upper Oder and Vistula rivers, covering most of modern south and middle Poland (regions of Silesia, Greater Poland, Mazovia and Little Poland).

Kingdom of Prussia

PrussiaPrussianPrussians
Most of Silesia was conquered by Prussia in 1742 and transferred from Austria to Prussia in the Treaty of Berlin.
Using the pretext of a 1537 treaty (vetoed by Emperor Ferdinand I) by which parts of Silesia were to pass to Brandenburg after the extinction of its ruling Piast dynasty, Frederick invaded Silesia, thereby beginning the War of the Austrian Succession.

Holy Roman Empire

ImperialHoly Roman EmperorGermany
In the 14th century, it became a constituent part of the Bohemian Crown Lands under the Holy Roman Empire, which passed to the Austrian Habsburg Monarchy in 1526.
The eastward settlement expanded the influence of the empire to include Pomerania and Silesia, as did the intermarriage of the local, still mostly Slavic, rulers with German spouses.

Duke of Silesia

Duke of WrocławSilesian branchSilesian duke
During the Fragmentation of Poland, Silesia and the rest of the country were divided among many independent duchies ruled by various Silesian dukes.
The Duchy of Silesia, one of the hereditary provinces of Poland, Silesia, was granted to Bolesław III's eldest son, Władysław II the Exile, and was subsequently divided among his sons Bolesław I the Tall (Wrocław/Lower Silesia), Mieszko I Tanglefoot (Racibórz/Upper Silesia) and Konrad Spindleshanks (Głogów).

Oława

OhlauOława (Ohlau)Ohlau (now Oława)
In the fourth century BC, Celts entered Silesia, settling around Mount Ślęża near modern Wrocław, Oława, and Strzelin.
After the Polish King Casimir III had renounced his rights on Silesia with the contract of Trenčín in 1335, Silesia became until 1806 a part of the Holy Roman Empire as a Bohemian fief.

Habsburg Monarchy

HabsburgAustriaAustrian
In the 14th century, it became a constituent part of the Bohemian Crown Lands under the Holy Roman Empire, which passed to the Austrian Habsburg Monarchy in 1526.
Silesia, Most of Silesia was conquered by Prussia in 1740–1742 and the remnants which stayed under Habsburg sovereignty were ruled as Duchy of Upper and Lower Silesia (Austrian Silesia).

Chrzanów

KrenauBalinKshaniv
In 1178, parts of the Duchy of Kraków around Bytom, Oświęcim, Chrzanów, and Siewierz were transferred to the Silesian Piasts, although their population was primarily Vistulan and not of Silesian descent.
The earliest documents which corroborate the existence of Chrzanów castellany come from the late 12th century when, in around 1178, Chrzanów castellany was annexed to Silesia by order of Duke Casimir II the Just.