Silistra

DrastarDorostolonDurostorumDorostolumSilistreDorostolDorostrolonDorystolonDristaDristra
Silistra (Силистра; Silistra) is a port city in northeastern Bulgaria.wikipedia
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Bulgaria–Romania border

border with Bulgariaborder with RomaniaBulgarian-Romanian border
The city lies on the southern bank of the lower Danube river, and is also the part of the Romanian border where it stops following the Danube.
For most of its length, the border follows the course of the lower Danube River up until the town of Silistra, where the river continues north into the Romanian territory.

Roman Tomb (Silistra)

Late Ancient Tomb of Silistrarichly-decorated Late Roman tomb
There are many historical landmarks including a richly-decorated Late Roman tomb, remains of the Medieval fortress, an Ottoman fort, and an art gallery.
The Roman Tomb of Silistra (Римска гробница в Силистра, Rimska grobnitsa v Silistra) is an Ancient Roman burial tomb in the town of Silistra in northeastern Bulgaria.

List of cities and towns in Bulgaria

is a towna citya town
Silistra (Силистра; Silistra) is a port city in northeastern Bulgaria.

Silistra Province

Silistra Silistra
Silistra is the administrative center of the Silistra Province and one of the important cities of the historical region of Southern Dobruja.
Silistra Province (Област Силистра, transliterated Oblast Silistra, former name Silistra okrug) is a province of Bulgaria, named after its main city - Silistra.

Dobruja

DobrogeaDobrudzhaDobrudja
It is located in the Bulgarian part of Dobruja.
This section has a total area of 7,565 km 2, with a combined population of some 310,000 people, the main towns being Dobrich and Silistra (regional seats).

Southern Dobruja

South Dobrudzhasouthern partCadrilater
Silistra is the administrative center of the Silistra Province and one of the important cities of the historical region of Southern Dobruja.
Southern Dobruja or South Dobruja (Bulgarian: Южна Добруджа, Yuzhna Dobrudzha or simply Добруджа, Dobrudzha) is an area of northeastern Bulgaria comprising the administrative districts named for its two principal cities of Dobrich and Silistra.

Dasius of Durostorum

DasiusDasius of DorostolumSt. Dasius
The Romans built a fortress in AD 29 on the site of an earlier Thracian settlement and kept its name, Durostorum (or Dorostorum). The earliest saints of Bulgaria are Roman soldiers executed at Durostorum during the Diocletian Persecution (303–313), including St. Dasius and St. Julius the Veteran.
Dasius of Durostorum is a Christian martyr of the early 4th century AD. He was a Roman soldier of Legio XI Claudiana at Durostorum (modern Silistra), Moesia Inferior who was beheaded in the early 4th century after his refusal to take the part of "king" in the local Saturnalia celebrations.

Julius the Veteran

Saint JuliusSt. Julius the Veteran
The Romans built a fortress in AD 29 on the site of an earlier Thracian settlement and kept its name, Durostorum (or Dorostorum). The earliest saints of Bulgaria are Roman soldiers executed at Durostorum during the Diocletian Persecution (303–313), including St. Dasius and St. Julius the Veteran.
Saint Julius the Veteran (Iulius), also known as Julius of Durostorum, is a Roman Catholic, Anglican and Eastern Orthodox saint and martyr.

Silistra Municipality

municipality of SilistraSilistra
The municipality of Silistra covers an area of 516 km 2 and includes the city and 18 villages.
It is named after its administrative centre - the city of Silistra which is also the capital of the province.

Auxentius of Durostorum

AuxentiusAuxentius the youngerLetter of Auxentius
Auxentius was expelled from Durostorum by an edict of Theodosius depriving Arian bishops in 383, and took refuge at Milan where he became embroiled in controversy with St Ambrose.
Auxentius of Durostorum also probably known as Mercurinus was a deacon in Alexandria and later bishop of Durostorum.

Danube

Danube RiverDanubianRiver Danube
The city lies on the southern bank of the lower Danube river, and is also the part of the Romanian border where it stops following the Danube.
Silistra

Crimean War

CrimeaCrimeanCrimean campaign
The town was captured and recaptured by Russian forces numerous times during several Russo-Turkish Wars and was besieged between 14 April and 23 June 1854 during the Crimean War.
Led by Omar Pasha, the Ottomans fought a strong defensive campaign and stopped the advance at Silistra.

Simeon I of Bulgaria

Simeon ISimeonSimeon the Great
In 895 (during the Bulgarian-Hungarian War of 894-896), the Hungarians, allies of the Byzantines, besieged the Bulgarian army under the personal command of Simeon I the Great in the fortress of the town but were repulsed.
Simeon's two encounters with the enemy in Northern Dobruja resulted in Magyar victories, forcing him to retreat to Drǎstǎr.

Siege of Dorostolon

defeatedDorostolonDorostolon, Siege of
The town was captured by the forces of Sviatoslav I of Kiev in 969, but two years later it was taken by the Byzantines during the Battle of Dorostolon.
After they defeated the united Rus'-Bulgarian forces in the Battle of Arcadiopolis and recaptured Pereyaslavets, Svyatoslav was forced to flee to the northern fortress of Dorostolon (Drustur/Dorostorum).

Bulgarian–Hungarian wars

Bulgarian-Hungarian WarBulgarians also attacked themFirst Bulgarian-Hungarian War
In 895 (during the Bulgarian-Hungarian War of 894-896), the Hungarians, allies of the Byzantines, besieged the Bulgarian army under the personal command of Simeon I the Great in the fortress of the town but were repulsed.
Defeated by the Hungarians, he sought refuge in the castle at Drastar (Silistra).

Odessa

OdesaOdessa, UkraineOdessa, USSR
The Ottoman Silistra Province was reduced in size, as the districts of Özi and Hocabey and the region of Bessarabia were ceded to the Russian Empire at the end of the 18th century and the beginning of the 19th century.
Hocabey was a sanjak centre of Silistre Province.

Second Bulgarian Empire

Bulgarian EmpireBulgariaBulgarian
In 1186, after the Rebellion of Asen and Peter, the town became part of the Second Bulgarian Empire and renamed Drastar.
After the Byzantines failed, Michael VIII turned to the Mongols, who invaded Dobrudzha and defeated Ivaylo's army, forcing him to retreat to Drastar, where he withstood a three-month siege.

Silistra Eyalet

Özü EyaletSilistra ProvinceSilistra
During Ottoman rule, Silistra (Ottoman Turkish: ) was part of Rumelia Province and was the administrative centre of the Silistra district (sanjak). This district was later upgraded to become the Silistra Province and stretched over most of the western Black Sea littoral.
It was named after Silistra, since its governor often resided in this Danubian fortress.

Patriarch of All Bulgaria

Patriarch of BulgariaBulgarian patriarchBulgarian Patriarchate
Around the end of the 7th century, the town was incorporated into the First Bulgarian Empire and the bishop of (Дръстър in Bulgarian) was proclaimed the first patriarch of Bulgaria.
The seat of the Patriarchate was the new Bulgarian capital of Preslav although the Patriarch is likely to have resided in the town of Drastar (Silistra), an old Christian centre famous for its martyrs and Christian traditions.

Moesia

Moesia InferiorMoesia SuperiorLower Moesia
Durostorum became an important military center of the Roman province of Moesia, and grew into a city at the time of Marcus Aurelius.
Moesia Secunda's main cities included Marcianopolis (Devnya), Odessus (Varna), Nicopolis (Nikopol), Abrittus (Razgrad), Durostorum (Silistra), Transmarisca (Tutrakan), Sexaginta Prista (Ruse) and Novae (Svishtov), all in Bulgaria today.

Eliezer Papo

Between 1819 and 1826, Eliezer Papo — a renowned Jewish scholar — was the rabbi of the community of Silistra, making this town famous among observant Jews.
Rabbi Eliezer Papo (1785–1828) was the rabbi of the community of Silistra in Bulgaria (then part of the Ottoman Empire).

John I Tzimiskes

John IJohn TzimiskesIoannis Tzimisces
It was renamed Theodoropolis, after military saint Theodore Stratelates, who is said to have come to the aid of Emperor John I Tzimiskes during the battle.
In a series of campaigns against the Kievan Rus' encroachment on the Lower Danube in 970–971, he drove the enemy out of Thrace in the Battle of Arcadiopolis, crossed Mt. Haemus, and besieged the fortress of Dorostolon (Silistra) on the Danube for sixty-five days, where after several hard-fought battles he defeated Great Prince Svyatoslav I of Rus'.

First Bulgarian Empire

Bulgarian EmpireBulgariaBulgarian
Around the end of the 7th century, the town was incorporated into the First Bulgarian Empire and the bishop of (Дръстър in Bulgarian) was proclaimed the first patriarch of Bulgaria.
It is likely that the seat of the Patriarchate was in the city of Drastar on the Danube River rather than in the capital Preslav.

Sviatoslav I of Kiev

SviatoslavSviatoslav ISvyatoslav
The town was captured by the forces of Sviatoslav I of Kiev in 969, but two years later it was taken by the Byzantines during the Battle of Dorostolon.
Sviatoslav retreated to Dorostolon, which the Byzantine armies besieged for sixty-five days.

Second Balkan War

Second(1913)1913
In May 1913, following the Second Balkan War and after unsuccessful Bulgarian-Romanian negotiations in London, the two countries accepted the mediation of the Great Powers, who awarded Silistra and the area in a 3 km radius around it to the Kingdom of Romania at the Saint Petersburg Conference.
Another point of friction arose: Bulgaria's refusal to cede the fortress of Silistra to Romania.