Silliman College

Silliman
Silliman College is a residential college at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, named for scientist and Yale professor Benjamin Silliman.wikipedia
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Residential colleges of Yale University

residential collegesresidential collegeresidential college system
Silliman College is a residential college at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, named for scientist and Yale professor Benjamin Silliman.
After three years of construction, the first seven residential colleges were opened on September 25, 1933, followed by Berkeley College in 1934, Timothy Dwight College in 1935, and Silliman College in 1940.

Old Campus (Yale University)

Old CampusLanman-Wright HallOld Brick Row
Due to its size, the college is able to house its freshmen in the college instead of on Yale's Old Campus.
Students assigned to Silliman, Timothy Dwight, Benjamin Franklin, and Pauli Murray live in their colleges for all four years.

Yale University

YaleYale CollegeUniversity of Yale
Silliman College is a residential college at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, named for scientist and Yale professor Benjamin Silliman.
Several are associated with members of the Vanderbilt family, including Vanderbilt Hall, Phelps Hall, St. Anthony Hall (a commission for member Frederick William Vanderbilt), the Mason, Sloane and Osborn laboratories, dormitories for the Sheffield Scientific School (the engineering and sciences school at Yale until 1956) and elements of Silliman College, the largest residential college.

Sheffield Scientific School

Yale Scientific SchoolScientific SchoolSheffield Chemical Laboratory
Yale's first buildings on the site were for the Sheffield Scientific School.
These buildings are now incorporated into Silliman College, and St. Anthony Hall still owns its building, which completes the College and Wall Street corner of the Silliman College Quadrangle.

Timothy Dwight College

Timothy Dwightone of its residential colleges
Its rival college at Yale is Timothy Dwight College, located directly across Temple Street.
TD has won the Tyng Cup more than any other college, including four more times than its rival, Silliman College.

F. S. C. Northrop

Filmer S. NorthropF.S.C. NorthropF.S.C. Northrup
When the college opened in 1940, philosopher F. S. C. Northrop was appointed its master.
He chaired the Philosophy department from 1938 to 1940 and was the first Master of Silliman College, from 1940 to 1947.

Benjamin Silliman

BenjaminBenjamin Silliman, Sr.Professor Silliman
Silliman College is a residential college at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, named for scientist and Yale professor Benjamin Silliman.
Silliman College, one of Yale's residential colleges, is named for him, as is the mineral Sillimanite.

Yale College

YaleYale Universitycolleges
Eight colleges were intended for Yale College, and two further for the Scientific School, one of which would be funded by Frederick W. Vanderbilt.
Additional colleges were opened in 1935 (Timothy Dwight College), 1940 (Silliman College), 1962 (Morse College and Ezra Stiles College), and 2017 (Pauli Murray College and Benjamin Franklin College), bringing the present-day number to fourteen.

Eggers & Higgins

Daniel Paul HigginsEggers and HigginsOtto R. Eggers
Otto Eggers of Eggers & Higgins, previously a draftsman for John Russell Pope's buildings at Yale, was selected as the college's architect.

St. Anthony Hall

Delta PsiSaint Anthony HallSt. Anthony Hall (Delta Psi)
In 1936, the university demolished the block of university buildings and houses that stood at the site, retaining only Van-Sheff, Byers Hall, and the adjacent St. Anthony Hall society building.

Dudley House (Harvard College)

Dudley HouseLehman HallAdele Lehman Hall
The College has links to Harvard's Pforzheimer House and Dudley House, as well as Trinity College, Cambridge and Brasenose College, Oxford.

Hiss and Weekes

Byers Hall, a three-story building of Indiana limestone, was built in 1903 and designed by Hiss and Weekes architects in the modified French Renaissance Style.

Evan Wolfson

At Yale, he was a resident of Silliman College, a history major, and Speaker of the Yale Political Union.

Frederick William Vanderbilt

Frederick W. VanderbiltFrederick VanderbiltFrederick
Eight colleges were intended for Yale College, and two further for the Scientific School, one of which would be funded by Frederick W. Vanderbilt.
He commissioned a number of campus buildings at Yale University by architect Charles C. Haight that survive to this day, from campus dormitories comprising the present-day Silliman College, to Vanderbilt Hall, Phelps Hall, the Mason, Sloane and Osborn laboratories, and his secret society, St. Anthony Hall.

Joshua Foer

Joshua
Foer went on to attend Yale University, where he resided in Silliman College and Trumbull College and majored in ecology and evolutionary biology and graduated with a B.A. in 2004.

New Haven, Connecticut

New HavenNew Haven, CTFoote School
Silliman College is a residential college at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, named for scientist and Yale professor Benjamin Silliman.

Georgian architecture

GeorgianGeorgian RevivalGeorgian style
The college's architecture is eclectic: though architect Otto Eggers completed most of the college with Georgian buildings, the college also incorporates two early-20th century buildings in the French Renaissance and Gothic Revival styles.

Renaissance Revival architecture

Renaissance RevivalNeo-RenaissanceItalian Renaissance Revival
Byers Hall, a three-story building of Indiana limestone, was built in 1903 and designed by Hiss and Weekes architects in the modified French Renaissance Style. The college's architecture is eclectic: though architect Otto Eggers completed most of the college with Georgian buildings, the college also incorporates two early-20th century buildings in the French Renaissance and Gothic Revival styles.

Gothic Revival architecture

Gothic RevivalNeo-GothicGothic
The college's architecture is eclectic: though architect Otto Eggers completed most of the college with Georgian buildings, the college also incorporates two early-20th century buildings in the French Renaissance and Gothic Revival styles. The Vanderbilt-Sheffield dormitory, a five-story building of the same material, was built between 1903 and 1906 by architect Charles C. Haight in the Gothic Revival style.

Harvard University

HarvardHarvard CollegeUniversity of Harvard
The College has links to Harvard's Pforzheimer House and Dudley House, as well as Trinity College, Cambridge and Brasenose College, Oxford.

Pforzheimer House

Pforzheimer House (Harvard College)
The College has links to Harvard's Pforzheimer House and Dudley House, as well as Trinity College, Cambridge and Brasenose College, Oxford.

Trinity College, Cambridge

Trinity CollegeTrinityTrinity College Cambridge
The College has links to Harvard's Pforzheimer House and Dudley House, as well as Trinity College, Cambridge and Brasenose College, Oxford.

Brasenose College, Oxford

Brasenose CollegeBrasenoseBrasenose College, Oxford University
The College has links to Harvard's Pforzheimer House and Dudley House, as well as Trinity College, Cambridge and Brasenose College, Oxford.

Indiana Limestone

Bedford limestoneBedford stonelimestone
Byers Hall, a three-story building of Indiana limestone, was built in 1903 and designed by Hiss and Weekes architects in the modified French Renaissance Style.

Charles C. Haight

Charles Coolidge HaightCharles Haight
The Vanderbilt-Sheffield dormitory, a five-story building of the same material, was built between 1903 and 1906 by architect Charles C. Haight in the Gothic Revival style.