Simeon (son of Jacob)

SimeonBiblical character SimeonShimonSimeon, son of JacobSimeão de Israel PaddanSimonSymeon
According to the Book of Genesis, Simeon was the second son of Jacob and Leah, and the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Simeon.wikipedia
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Jacob

Israelsons of JacobJacob (Israel)
According to the Book of Genesis, Simeon was the second son of Jacob and Leah, and the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Simeon.
Jacob's twelve sons, named in Genesis, were Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, Asher, Issachar, Zebulun, Joseph, and Benjamin.

Tribe of Simeon

SimeonSimeoniteSimeonites
According to the Book of Genesis, Simeon was the second son of Jacob and Leah, and the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Simeon.
According to the Hebrew Bible, the tribe consisted of descendants of Simeon, the second son of Jacob and of Leah, from whom it took its name.

Leah

First wifeLeaLeah bint Laban
According to the Book of Genesis, Simeon was the second son of Jacob and Leah, and the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Simeon.
Leah is the mother of six of Jacob's sons, including his first four (Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah), and later two more (Issachar and Zebulun), and a daughter (Dinah).

Israelites

IsraeliteIsraelchildren of Israel
According to the Book of Genesis, Simeon was the second son of Jacob and Leah, and the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Simeon.
Jacob's twelve sons (in order of birth), Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, Asher, Issachar, Zebulun, Joseph and Benjamin, become the ancestors of twelve tribes, with the exception of Joseph, whose two sons Mannasseh and Ephraim, who were adopted by Jacob, become tribal eponyms.

Dinah

rape of DinahDinaDinah bint Jacob
In the Torah's account of the rape of Dinah, wherein Dinah was raped (or in some versions, merely seduced) by a Canaanite named Shechem.
The episode of her violation by Shechem, son of a Canaanite or Hivite prince, and the subsequent vengeance of her brothers Simeon and Levi, commonly referred to as the rape of Dinah, is told in Genesis 34.

Simeon in rabbinic literature

Simeon in rabbinic literature
Allusions in rabbinic literature to the biblical character Simeon, son of Jacob, contain various expansions, elaborations and inferences beyond what is presented in the text of the Bible itself.

Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs

Anonymous Testaments of the 12 PatriarchsAramaic LeviTestament of Naftali
The Testament of Simeon, on the other hand, declares that Simeon acknowledged that it was just for him to be imprisoned, given his earlier mistreatment of Joseph, and so he went willingly.
In the Genesis narrative, Simeon is portrayed as having been bound in chains by Joseph, and the author of the Testament argues that Simeon had wanted to kill Joseph due to jealousy, allowing the Testament to continue with a discourse about envy.

Judah (son of Jacob)

JudahJudasJuda
The midrashic book of Jasher argues that Simeon was the one who proposed that the brothers should kill Joseph, and other classical sources argue that it was Simeon who threw Joseph into a pit, and became furious when he found out that Judah had sold Joseph rather than killed him.
Judah is the fourth son of the patriarch Jacob and his first wife, Leah: his full brothers are Reuben, Simeon and Levi (all older), and Issachar and Zebulun (younger) and one full sister Dinah.

Joseph (Genesis)

JosephJoseph in Potiphar's houseBiblical Joseph
The classical rabbinical sources argue that Simeon was very fearless, but also was particularly envious, and so had always been antagonistic and spiteful towards Joseph, owing to Joseph being Jacob's favourite son.
When he returned, the Vizier took Simeon and bound him as a hostage.

Benjamin

BenBen HorneBenjamin Loong
In the biblical Joseph narrative, when Joseph, having settled in Egypt, asks his brothers to bring Benjamin to him, he takes Simeon hostage to ensure that they return.

Zebulun

ZabulonZebulom de Israel PaddanZebulon

Reuben (son of Jacob)

ReubenRubenRubem de Israel Paddan
Many of the rabbinical sources argue that Simeon died at the age of 120, roughly three years before the death of his brother Reuben, although Numbers Rabbah states that Simeon became the senior of the brothers after Reuben had died.

Gad (son of Jacob)

GadGade Mayanthe son of Jacob named ''Gad

Book of Genesis

GenesisGen.Gen
According to the Book of Genesis, Simeon was the second son of Jacob and Leah, and the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Simeon.

Biblical criticism

biblical scholarsbiblical scholarshipcritical scholars
However, some Biblical scholars view this as postdiction, an eponymous metaphor providing an etiology of the connectedness of the tribe to others in the Israelite confederation.

Eponym

eponymousself-titledeponyms
However, some Biblical scholars view this as postdiction, an eponymous metaphor providing an etiology of the connectedness of the tribe to others in the Israelite confederation.

Metaphor

metaphorsmetaphoricalmetaphorically
However, some Biblical scholars view this as postdiction, an eponymous metaphor providing an etiology of the connectedness of the tribe to others in the Israelite confederation.

Etiology

aetiologyetiologicalaetiological
However, some Biblical scholars view this as postdiction, an eponymous metaphor providing an etiology of the connectedness of the tribe to others in the Israelite confederation.

Matriarchy

matriarchmatriarchalmatriarchal society
With Leah as a matriarch, Biblical scholars regard the tribe as having been believed by the text's authors to have been part of the original Israelite confederation, however, the tribe is absent from the parts of the Bible which textual scholars regard as the oldest (for example, the ancient Song of Deborah), and some scholars think that Simeon was not originally regarded as a distinct tribe.

Textual criticism

critical editiontextual scholarstextual critic
With Leah as a matriarch, Biblical scholars regard the tribe as having been believed by the text's authors to have been part of the original Israelite confederation, however, the tribe is absent from the parts of the Bible which textual scholars regard as the oldest (for example, the ancient Song of Deborah), and some scholars think that Simeon was not originally regarded as a distinct tribe.

Deborah

Song of DeborahDeborah de ArimatéiaDeborah the prophetess
With Leah as a matriarch, Biblical scholars regard the tribe as having been believed by the text's authors to have been part of the original Israelite confederation, however, the tribe is absent from the parts of the Bible which textual scholars regard as the oldest (for example, the ancient Song of Deborah), and some scholars think that Simeon was not originally regarded as a distinct tribe.