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Computer-on-module

A computer-on-module is a type of single-board computer made to plug into a carrier board, baseboard, or backplane for system expansion.
A computer-on-module (COM) is a type of single-board computer (SBC), a subtype of an embedded computer system.

KIM-1

Commodore KIM-1KIMMOS Technology KIM-1
Other typical early single board computers like the KIM-1 were often shipped without enclosure, which had to be added by the owner.
The KIM-1, short for Keyboard Input Monitor, is a small 6502-based single-board computer developed and produced by MOS Technology, Inc. and launched in 1976.

Nascom (computer kit)

NASCOM 1NascomNascom 1 and Nascom 2
Other examples are the Ferguson Big Board and the Nascom.
The Nascom 1 and 2 were single-board computer kits issued in the United Kingdom in 1977 and 1979, respectively, based on the Zilog Z80 and including a keyboard and video interface, a serial port that could be used to store data on a tape cassette using the Kansas City standard, and two 8-bit parallel ports.

Intel 8080

80808080Ai8080
The first true single-board computer (see the May 1976 issue of Radio-Electronics) called the "dyna-micro" was based on the Intel C8080A, and also used Intel's first EPROM, the C1702A.
The first single-board microcomputers, such as MYCRO-1 and the dyna-micro were based on the Intel 8080.

Expansion card

expansion slotdaughterboardexpansion bus
Unlike a desktop personal computer, single board computers often do not rely on expansion slots for peripheral functions or expansion. The main components were assembled on a motherboard, and peripheral components such as serial ports, disk drive controllers, and graphics processors were located on daughterboards.
Some single-board computers made no provision for expansion cards, and may only have provided IC sockets on the board for limited changes or customization.

PICMG

PCI Industrial Computer Manufacturers GroupPCI Industrial Computers Manufacturers Group (PICMG)
Some of these types are CompactPCI, PXI, VMEbus, VXI, and PICMG.
Where X was used denoted differing form factors (“1” for slot card based single board computers, “2” for CompactPCI and “3” for AdvancedTCA) while YY was used to indicate incremental changes, option definitions or slight variation of a specification form its core specification.

Comparison of single-board computers

ComparisonPhidgetSBC3single-board
Comparison of single-board computers
Comparison of single-board computers excluding single-board microcontrollers.

EPIC (form factor)

EPICEPIC - PCI/ISA
Examples of stacking SBC form factors include PC/104, PC/104-Plus, PCI-104, EPIC, and EBX; these systems are commonly available for use in embedded control systems.
Embedded Platform for Industrial Computing (EPIC) is a computer form factor, a standard for an industrial-quality SBC

Motherboard

mainboardmotherboardslogic board
The main components were assembled on a motherboard, and peripheral components such as serial ports, disk drive controllers, and graphics processors were located on daughterboards.
Single-board computer

Single-board microcontroller

single-board micro controller
Single-board microcontroller
A single-board microcontroller differs from a single-board computer in that it lacks the general-purpose user interface and mass storage interfaces that a more general-purpose computer would have.

Computer

computerscomputer systemdigital computer
A single-board computer (SBC) is a complete computer built on a single circuit board, with microprocessor(s), memory, input/output (I/O) and other features required of a functional computer.

Microprocessor

microprocessorsprocessorchip
A single-board computer (SBC) is a complete computer built on a single circuit board, with microprocessor(s), memory, input/output (I/O) and other features required of a functional computer.

Random-access memory

RAMmemoryrandom access memory
A single-board computer (SBC) is a complete computer built on a single circuit board, with microprocessor(s), memory, input/output (I/O) and other features required of a functional computer.

Input/output

I/Ooutputinterface
A single-board computer (SBC) is a complete computer built on a single circuit board, with microprocessor(s), memory, input/output (I/O) and other features required of a functional computer.

Embedded system

embedded systemsembeddedembedded device
Single-board computers were made as demonstration or development systems, for educational systems, or for use as embedded computer controllers.

Home computer

home computershomehome computing
Many types of home computers or portable computers integrate all their functions onto a single printed circuit board.

Portable computer

portableluggableportable computers
Many types of home computers or portable computers integrate all their functions onto a single printed circuit board.

Printed circuit board

circuit boardPCBprinted circuit boards
A single-board computer (SBC) is a complete computer built on a single circuit board, with microprocessor(s), memory, input/output (I/O) and other features required of a functional computer. Many types of home computers or portable computers integrate all their functions onto a single printed circuit board.

Personal computer

PCPCspersonal computers
Unlike a desktop personal computer, single board computers often do not rely on expansion slots for peripheral functions or expansion.

Static random-access memory

SRAMstatic RAMstatic random access memory
Simple designs, such as those built by computer hobbyists, often use static RAM and low-cost 8- or 16-bit processors.

Blade server

bladebladesblade servers
Other types, such as blade servers, would perform similar to a server computer, only in a more compact format.

Server (computing)

serverserversserver computer
Other types, such as blade servers, would perform similar to a server computer, only in a more compact format.

Backplane

backplanesmidplanebackwiring boards
A computer-on-module is a type of single-board computer made to plug into a carrier board, baseboard, or backplane for system expansion.

Radio-Electronics

The first true single-board computer (see the May 1976 issue of Radio-Electronics) called the "dyna-micro" was based on the Intel C8080A, and also used Intel's first EPROM, the C1702A.

EPROM

EPROMSerasable programmable read only memory2764 EPROM
The first true single-board computer (see the May 1976 issue of Radio-Electronics) called the "dyna-micro" was based on the Intel C8080A, and also used Intel's first EPROM, the C1702A.