Sioux

DakotaSioux IndianSiouanDakota SiouxSioux IndiansSanteeSioux peopleDakotahShirt WearersYankton
The Sioux (Dakota: Očhéthi Šakówiŋ /otʃʰeːtʰi ʃakoːwĩ/) are groups of Native American tribes and First Nations peoples in North America.wikipedia
1,517 Related Articles

Great Sioux Nation

Oceti SakowinSioux NationSioux
The term is an exonym created from a French transcription of the Anishinaabe term "Nadouessioux", and can refer to any ethnic group within the Great Sioux Nation or to any of the nation's many language dialects.
The Great Sioux Nation is the traditional political structure of the Sioux in North America.

Dakota War of 1862

Dakota WarSioux UprisingDakota Conflict
Failure of the United States to make treaty payments ontime as well as low food supplies led to the Dakota War of 1862, which resulted in the Dakota being exiled from Minnesota to numerous reservations in Nebraska, North and South Dakota and Canada.
The Dakota War of 1862, also known as the Sioux Uprising, the Dakota Uprising, the Sioux Outbreak of 1862, the Dakota Conflict, the U.S.–Dakota War of 1862 or Little Crow's War, was an armed conflict between the United States and several bands of Dakota (also known as the eastern 'Sioux').

Ojibwe

OjibwaChippewaOjibway
Wars with the Ojibwe throughout the 1700s pushed the Dakota into southern Minnesota, where the Western Dakota (Yankton, Yanktonai) and Teton (Lakota) were residing.
In the United States, they have the fifth-largest population among Native American peoples, surpassed in number only by the Navajo, Cherokee, Choctaw and Sioux.

Sioux Wars

First Sioux WarSioux WarSioux Campaign
They fought the United States Army in the Sioux Wars including defeating the 7th Cavalry Regiment at the Battle of Little Big Horn.
The Sioux Wars were a series of conflicts between the United States and various subgroups of the Sioux people which occurred in the later half of the 19th century.

South Dakota

SDState of South DakotaDakota
Today, the Sioux maintain many separate tribal governments scattered across several reservations, communities, and reserves in North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Minnesota, and Montana in the United States; and Manitoba, southern Saskatchewan, and Alberta in Canada.
It is named after the Lakota and Dakota Sioux Native American tribes, who compose a large portion of the population and historically dominated the territory.

7th Cavalry Regiment

7th Cavalry7th U.S. CavalryU.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment
They fought the United States Army in the Sioux Wars including defeating the 7th Cavalry Regiment at the Battle of Little Big Horn.
That same year, Custer was relieved of his command for pursuing a band of Sioux and Cheyenne at such a rapid pace that several men deserted.

Nebraska

NEState of NebraskaGeography of Nebraska
Today, the Sioux maintain many separate tribal governments scattered across several reservations, communities, and reserves in North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Minnesota, and Montana in the United States; and Manitoba, southern Saskatchewan, and Alberta in Canada.
Indigenous peoples, including Omaha, Missouria, Ponca, Pawnee, Otoe, and various branches of the Lakota (Sioux) tribes, lived in the region for thousands of years before European exploration.

Minnesota

MNState of MinnesotaMinnesota, USA
Today, the Sioux maintain many separate tribal governments scattered across several reservations, communities, and reserves in North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Minnesota, and Montana in the United States; and Manitoba, southern Saskatchewan, and Alberta in Canada.
Before European settlement of North America, a subculture of Sioux called the Dakota people lived in Minnesota.

Crazy Horse

CrazyhorseChief Crazy HorseBlack Buffalo
The fight was an overwhelming victory for the Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho, who were led by several major war leaders, including Crazy Horse and Chief Gall, and had been inspired by the visions of Sitting Bull.
Crazy Horse was born to parents from two bands of the Lakota division of the Sioux, his father being an Oglala and his mother a Miniconjou.

Nakoda (Stoney)

StoneyNakodaStoney Indian
The actual Nakota are the Assiniboine and Stoney of Western Canada and Montana.
Through their language they are related to the Dakota and Lakota nations of the Great Plains and the Rocky Mountains, part of the large Sioux Nation.

Saskatchewan

SKSaskatchewan, CanadaProvince of Saskatchewan
Today, the Sioux maintain many separate tribal governments scattered across several reservations, communities, and reserves in North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Minnesota, and Montana in the United States; and Manitoba, southern Saskatchewan, and Alberta in Canada.
Saskatchewan has been populated by various indigenous peoples of North America, including members of the Sarcee, Niitsitapi, Atsina, Cree, Saulteaux, Assiniboine (Nakoda), Lakota and Sioux.

Nakota

NakodaNakota or Nakodapeople
They are considered to be the Western Dakota (also called middle Sioux), and have in the past been erroneously classified as Nakota.
They are Dakotan-speaking tribes that broke away from the main branches of the Sioux nation in earlier times.

Pipestone National Monument

Pipestone Quarrypipestone quarriesRed Pipestone Quarry
Despite ceding their lands, their treaty with the U.S. government allowed them to maintain their traditional role in the Očhéthi Šakówiŋ as the caretakers of the Pipestone Quarry, which is the cultural center of the Sioux people.
The quarries are sacred to many of the tribes of North America, including the Dakota, Lakota, and other tribes of Native Americans, and were neutral territory where all Nations could quarry stone for ceremonial pipes.

Fourth Treaty of Prairie du Chien

18301830 Treaty of Prairie de Chien1830 Treaty of Prairie du Chien
In the 1830 Treaty of Prairie de Chien, the Western Dakota (Yankton, Yanktonai) ceded their lands along the Des Moines river to the American government.
The fourth Treaty of Prairie du Chien was negotiated between the United States and the Sac and Fox, the Mdewakanton, Wahpekute, Wahpeton and Sisiton Sioux, Omaha, Ioway, Otoe and Missouria tribes.

Native Americans in the United States

Native AmericanNative AmericansAmerican Indian
The Sioux (Dakota: Očhéthi Šakówiŋ /otʃʰeːtʰi ʃakoːwĩ/) are groups of Native American tribes and First Nations peoples in North America.
As of 2000, the largest groups in the United States by population were Navajo, Cherokee, Choctaw, Sioux, Chippewa, Apache, Blackfeet, Iroquois, and Pueblo.

Manitoba

MBManitoba, CanadaProvince of Manitoba
Today, the Sioux maintain many separate tribal governments scattered across several reservations, communities, and reserves in North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Minnesota, and Montana in the United States; and Manitoba, southern Saskatchewan, and Alberta in Canada.
The Ojibwe, Cree, Dene, Sioux, Mandan, and Assiniboine peoples founded settlements, and other tribes entered the area to trade.

Cree

Cree peopleNehiyawCree Nation
The Dakota began to resent the Ojibwe trading with the hereditary enemies of the Sioux, the Cree and Assiniboine.
On the other Reservations, the Cree minority share the Reservation with the Assiniboine, Gros Ventre and Sioux tribes.

Saint Paul, Minnesota

St. Paul, MinnesotaSaint PaulSt. Paul
Zebulon Pike negotiated for 100,000 acres of land at the confluence of the St. Croix River about what now is Hastings, Minnesota and the confluence of the Minnesota River and Mississippi River about what now is St Paul, Minnesota. On August 16, 1862, the treaty payments to the Dakota arrived in St. Paul, Minnesota, and were brought to Fort Ridgely the next day.
From the early 17th century until 1837, the Mdewakanton Dakota, a tribe of the Sioux, lived near the mounds after fleeing their ancestral home of Mille Lacs Lake from advancing Ojibwe.

Montana

MTState of MontanaMontana, USA
Today, the Sioux maintain many separate tribal governments scattered across several reservations, communities, and reserves in North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Minnesota, and Montana in the United States; and Manitoba, southern Saskatchewan, and Alberta in Canada. The actual Nakota are the Assiniboine and Stoney of Western Canada and Montana.
Jay Cooke, the NPR president, launched major surveys into the Yellowstone valley in 1871, 1872, and 1873, which were challenged forcefully by the Sioux under chief Sitting Bull.

First Treaty of Prairie du Chien

18251825 Treaty of Prairie du Chienmulti-tribal treaty
In an attempt to stop intertribal warfare and to better able to negotiate with tribes, the American government signed the 1825 Treaty of Prairie du Chien with the Dakota, Ojibwe, Menominee, Ho-Chunk, Sac and Fox, Iowa, Potawatomi, and Ottawa tribes.
The Treaty of Prairie du Chien may refer to any of several treaties made and signed in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin between the United States, representatives from the Sioux, Sac and Fox, Menominee, Ioway, Winnebago and the Anishinaabeg (Chippewa, Ottawa and Potawatomi) Native American peoples.

Treaty of Traverse des Sioux

Traverse des Sioux1851 Treaty of Traverse des Siouxceded land in 1851
The reservation period for them began in 1851 with the signing of the Treaty of Mendota and the Treaty of Traverse des Sioux.
The Treaty of Traverse des Sioux was a treaty signed on July 23, 1851, at Traverse des Sioux in Minnesota Territory between the United States government and Sioux Indian bands in Minnesota Territory.

Iowa

IAState of IowaNorthern Iowa
The men remanded by order of President Lincoln were sent to a prison in Iowa, where more than half died.
Tribes which were probably descendants of the prehistoric Oneota include the Dakota, Ho-Chunk, Ioway, and Otoe.

Fort Ridgely

Fort Ridgely, MinnesotaFort Ridgley, MinnesotaForts Ridgely
On August 16, 1862, the treaty payments to the Dakota arrived in St. Paul, Minnesota, and were brought to Fort Ridgely the next day.
Fort Ridgely was a United States Army outpost (1853–1867) near the Dakota reservation in southwestern Minnesota (located near Fairfax).

Daniel Greysolon, Sieur du Lhut

Daniel Greysolon DuluthDaniel GreysolonDaniel Greysolon Dulhut
Later visiting French traders and missionaries included Claude-Jean Allouez, Daniel Greysolon Duluth, and Pierre-Charles Le Sueur who wintered with Dakota bands in early 1700.
In September 1678, Dulhut left Montreal for Lake Superior, spending the winter near Sault Sainte Marie and reaching the western end of the lake in the fall of the following year, where he concluded peace talks between the Anishinaabe (Saulteur) and Dakota (Sioux) peoples.

Pierre-Esprit Radisson

RadissonPierre Esprit RadissonPierre Radisson
The first recorded encounter between the Sioux and the French occurred when Radisson and Groseilliers reached what is now Wisconsin during the winter of 1659–60.
In the winter of 1659–1660, Radisson and Des Groseilliers lived just south of Lake Superior in what is now Wisconsin, associating with groups of Huron, Ottawa, Ojibwa and Sioux Indians.